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To Portuguese and Spanish speakers

  Tags: Portuguese | Spanish
 Language Learning Forum : Specific Languages Post Reply
44 messages over 6 pages: 1 2 35 6  Next >>
Alvinho
Triglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5322 days ago

828 posts - 832 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, English, Spanish

 
 Message 25 of 44
12 August 2008 at 11:34am | IP Logged 
ElfoEscuro wrote:
Alvinho wrote:
as for summer stunning coastal spots, I would recommend Florianopolis, Bombinhas, Paraty, Jericoacoara, Arraial do Cabo, Lencois Maranhenses National Park and Paraiba state's southern coast....

I would like to add a recommendation for Balneário Camboriú.


Balneario Camboriu is ideal for enjoying nightlife in summer...the urban beaches are polluted and crowded...
1 person has voted this message useful



Einsiedler
Newbie
United States
Joined 5036 days ago

1 posts - 1 votes
Speaks: English*
Studies: German, Portuguese, Arabic (Written)

 
 Message 26 of 44
12 August 2008 at 10:44pm | IP Logged 
I studied Spanish for 3 years before I discovered how awesome Portuguese is. Once I started learning it, my previous experience with Spanish made my Portuguese learning go so much quicker and smoother. So, I agree with your decision to get a reasonable command in Spanish first, because it will definitely help you out in the long run.
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Flarioca
Heptaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 4970 days ago

635 posts - 816 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Esperanto, French, EnglishC2, Spanish, German, Italian
Studies: Catalan, Mandarin

 
 Message 27 of 44
18 October 2008 at 12:26am | IP Logged 
This is my first post on this forum, so I decided to talk about something I could be a little helpfull.

People seem to believe that it is easier for brazilians to understand Spanish speaking people from South America than otherwise. There appeared some interviews about the subject on tv, but I don't know any conclusive study.

The main point is that there are more vowel sounds in portuguese. However, this is not enough to decide the question, I guess.

On the other hand, although the grammar structure of the two languages are very similar, this is not enough.

Most educated brazilian naively assume that they can easily write in Spanish, but we can't.

Besides, there are a lot of false friends and badly "translated" words that make some pseudo-spanish speeches very funny. The most famous came from an ex-brazilian president, whose name I prefer not to repeat.

Finally, I hope you all have fun learning portuguese and a nice trip to Brazil and Portugal, two countries I love, of course.

Edited by Flarioca on 18 October 2008 at 12:31am

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Alvinho
Triglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5322 days ago

828 posts - 832 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, English, Spanish

 
 Message 28 of 44
18 October 2008 at 10:49am | IP Logged 
[QUOTE=Flarioca] This is my first post on this forum, so I decided to talk about something I could be a little helpful.

Welcome, dude....one more Brazilian here is so nice....


Most educated brazilian naively assume that they can easily write in Spanish, but we can't.

Besides, there are a lot of false friends and badly "translated" words that make some pseudo-spanish speeches very funny. The most famous came from an ex-brazilian president, whose name I prefer not to repeat.

sometimes it sounds funny, but I admit as I am quite purist it sounds pretty silly to me....why don't you mention Spanish is still hugely underrated by most Brazilians?




Edited by Alvinho on 18 October 2008 at 10:53am

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Flarioca
Heptaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 4970 days ago

635 posts - 816 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Esperanto, French, EnglishC2, Spanish, German, Italian
Studies: Catalan, Mandarin

 
 Message 29 of 44
18 October 2008 at 12:03pm | IP Logged 
Hi, Alvinho! The stats of this site tell us that there are, at this moment, 122 registered brazilians on this forum.

Where are these people? Well, since 109 say they are learning English, they probably are not at ease writing in this language. I have not yet explored all areas of this site, so I ask you if there is a place where people chat in their native language?

On the other hand, there are 126 americans (out of 1978, 6%) whose target language is portuguese!!

About brazilians and Spanish, it seems to me that the opinion and interest of our people towards Spanish is quickly changing, specially among youngsters.
1 person has voted this message useful



Flarioca
Heptaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 4970 days ago

635 posts - 816 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Esperanto, French, EnglishC2, Spanish, German, Italian
Studies: Catalan, Mandarin

 
 Message 30 of 44
18 October 2008 at 12:17pm | IP Logged 
PS: I've just found where people talk in their native languages, but decided not to edit the message above.
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SlickAs
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 4965 days ago

185 posts - 287 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish, French, Swedish
Studies: Thai, Vietnamese

 
 Message 31 of 44
22 October 2008 at 11:27pm | IP Logged 
Volte wrote:
JW wrote:

To, me it seems inevitable that you will mix, at least a little, between Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese. The three are just too similar to totally avoid it. It seems that almost every time I have ever heard someone who speaks more than one of those languages speaking, they mix in at least a word or two from the other language. I do it with Spanish and Italian. If there are people who never mix these languages, I would love to hear how they avoid it.


It is most certainly not inevitable to mix them, or similar Germanic languages. Examples: Furyou_gaijin (his Dutch was perfect, without the slightest trace of German, as was his English), Professor Arguelles (an interview with him on his experiences with leaving Lebanon due to the war was posted a couple of years ago, in English and Spanish, and his Spanish had no trace of Italian), and most native speakers of Italian I know who know any of another Romance language.

I don't know how they do it, but it's very clearly possible.

I don't mix Spanish or French into my Italian; I have to fish in my 'philological reserves' to attempt to speak the other two, so the converse doesn't hold.

I think as a goal as your ability in the less proficient language increases, you will mix less and less. But the way I learned French (having already learned Spanish to fluency) was largely in the streets. In other words, I did not step out of the house with my language "finished" when I started speaking French. And trying to modify Spanish to give you the French gives you a lot, although you are often wrong too. For example I remember once vividly people taking enormous pleasure in my asking a shop assistant if they sold a clothes iron. I tried coming from Spanish "Vendez vous des planches" (una plancha) ... no comprehension ... (planche means "plank", but "planche a repasser" would have been ironing board, so I was close). Given I was wrong I tried again, this time coming from English, translating Iron with wild hand gesticulations "un fer pour les vetments" ... ah! Un fer a repasser", and bingo! The shop assistant in an electrical store thought it halarious that I was asking if they sold wooden planks though!

With improving French, the mixture became less and less, but I am still aware that, when searching in my mind for an unknown word in any of my languages, the word from my other languages will pop into my head.

Sorting out the separation is part of the skill. When I was just bi-lingual I had a switch in my head ... switch it one way, and English comes out, the other way and Swedish comes out ... adding 3rd and 4th languages meant I needed to refine my mental switch and until a certain level was attained.

I still have a slight Spanish accent in my French, which is strange; you would think I would have the standard anglophone accent, but maybe it is my underlying Australian accent that confuses them and causes them to listen closely and try to guess...
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JW
Hexaglot
Senior Member
United States
youtube.com/user/egw
Joined 5210 days ago

1802 posts - 2011 votes 
22 sounds
Speaks: English*, German, Spanish, Ancient Greek, French, Biblical Hebrew
Studies: Luxembourgish, Dutch, Greek, Italian

 
 Message 32 of 44
23 October 2008 at 2:50pm | IP Logged 
SlickAs wrote:
Sorting out the separation is part of the skill. When I was just bi-lingual I had a switch in my head ... switch it one way, and English comes out, the other way and Swedish comes out ... adding 3rd and 4th languages meant I needed to refine my mental switch and until a certain level was attained.

Very well said. I like the metaphor of refining your mental switch.   



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