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How many words do you learn per day?

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
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bbbyblos
Triglot
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Russian Federation
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 Message 129 of 213
04 August 2010 at 3:30pm | IP Logged 
Can I ask one stupid question? How do you choose those words that you want to learn every day? Just interesting for me and for my studying!
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Khublei
Bilingual Triglot
Senior Member
Yugoslavia
homestayperu.net
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 Message 130 of 213
04 August 2010 at 4:28pm | IP Logged 
bbbyblos wrote:
Can I ask one stupid question? How do you choose those words that you want to learn every day? Just interesting for me and for my studying!


I just have a conversation with myself, and whatever words I didn't know I look up and learn them. Some days it's 0, some 30.
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slymie
Tetraglot
Groupie
China
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Studies: Shanghainese, Uyghur, Russian

 
 Message 131 of 213
05 August 2010 at 6:33am | IP Logged 
astein wrote:


Well, I have found that the groundwork for learning Chinese is the most important step. Learn the stroke order first, and then it will just be natural...you won´t have that extra bit to learn. You simply need to develop the ability to see the character as a whole, or as a variation of another character that you know.

Once you get to that point, it becomes very, very easy to remember the characters, because it just becomes some permutation of the 200-300 radicals. When I was first starting to memorize characters, I would find it difficult to learn more than 20 or so in a sitting, and these were easy words. Your mind starts to rewire itself in a genuine way, and it is now not terribly difficult for me to memorize 100 new characters at a time.

Also, once you get past a certain stage (this applies only for Chinese; I haven´t studied Japanses), you will only rarely need to actually learn a new character, as you are mostly just learning new words. That point came around 4-5000 characters for me. I have learned tons of words since then, but relatively few characters, and those have been of significantly more limited use (eg. the characters for crimson, dust, and so forth).


Good stuff. I have no idea what people are saying about memorizing stroke order. Left to right top to bottom. Once you are used to the radicals and basic hanzi you should never have to memorize stroke order. One of the great things about Chinese is once you know the most common hanzi and radicals you can almost always guess the meaning.

As for learning 100 hanzi a day, I hope beginners don't take that goal seriously, its very unreasonable for a beginner to memorize that much in a day. 100 chinese words in a day, for an intermediate-advanced learner, perhaps. But 100 hanzi to a beginner?

太离谱儿。
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Arekkusu
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Canada
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 Message 132 of 213
05 August 2010 at 6:13pm | IP Logged 
Khublei wrote:
bbbyblos wrote:
Can I ask one stupid question? How do you choose those words that you want to learn every day? Just interesting for me and for my studying!


I just have a conversation with myself, and whatever words I didn't know I look up and learn them. Some days it's 0, some 30.

Excellent strategy.

On the upside, you acquire all the words you need to express yourself as they are really needed in real life (not in theory); on the downside, the acquisition is based on the needs in your language(s), not in the target language. Still, this is a must for anyone wishing to acquire fluency.
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ladanoise
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United States
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 Message 133 of 213
05 August 2010 at 7:01pm | IP Logged 
The way I choose words to learn for vocabulary is to read books and newspaper articles and put the words I don't know on flash cards. It is sometimes interesting to be reading a book that involves a shipwreck, for instance, and then read something about a shipwreck in the news several days later. The synchronicity that happens is sometimes bizarre!
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doviende
Diglot
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Canada
languagefixatio
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 Message 134 of 213
05 August 2010 at 8:14pm | IP Logged 
Since most of my language learning comes from various activities with real novels in the target language, I tend to get most of my vocabulary from those books. I usually try to be selective in which words I look up. At the beginning stages, I might do lots of lookups, since I don't get many of the words at all and I need to build a base. Later on, I try to only look up a word after I've seen it at least a couple of times, so that I don't spend my time looking up a whole bunch of frivolous words.

So, currently I'm trying to read a more difficult book in Swedish, and my level is only intermediate still, so I've been doing more lookups than usually in an attempt to jump up a bit. I have to be careful though, because this means that I'm sacrificing some of the pure enjoyment of reading that I might gain more of if I dropped back to an easier book.

In German, I'm at a much higher level of vocabulary, so I usually take the time to look up almost every single word that I don't know, because there are only a handful on each page. This varies from book to book too, so I've tried to move up again to a more difficult book in that too.

And of course, every word that I take the time to look up will be put into Anki with an example sentence, because I don't want that lookup effort to go to waste by forgetting it a day later. So, as a result, depending on the difficulty of the book and my effort that day, I might do between 5 and 50 new words per day, although 20 is a more typical number.
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kidshomestunner
Senior Member
United Kingdom
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239 posts - 285 votes 
Speaks: Japanese

 
 Message 135 of 213
06 August 2010 at 12:15am | IP Logged 
Somebody asked me this and I said "as many as I can".

Pedants would argue about the meaning of word and tbh I think there is some mileage to this argument.

When I am starting off learning I would learn about fifty though I remember cramming for exams when I was younger and learning about 100-150 a day.

I would advise somebody to learn fifty a day.
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Iversen
Super Polyglot
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Denmark
berejst.dk
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 Message 136 of 213
03 September 2010 at 10:26am | IP Logged 
bbbyblos wrote:
Can I ask one stupid question? How do you choose those words that you want to learn every day? Just interesting for me and for my studying!


I have two main sources for my wordlists: things I read intensively and dictionaries.

The texts I choose for intensive reading must have a theme that is interesting, otherwise I wouldn't choose them (and it's almost exclusively non fiction). And then it follows that I learn words from a certain area of knowledge and that the words are used in 'serious' writing. Which leaves out words and expressions from ordinary smalltalk which may occur in litterature, but rarely in texts about science or culture. But I don't like smalltalk, so it's not a big thing missing out on those words.

I rarely use unknown words from my extensive reading or listening. Of course I might learn a few words here and there, but I would lose the momentum in those activities. However if I do have to do it because a whole passage otherwise would be pure gibberish, then the flow has already been disturbed and then I may just as well take the time to make a note about the word.

When I use a dictionary I choose words that might be useful, but also words that just catch my imagination. In series of related words I just choose a few representative words because when I have learned those the rest will be easy to learn at a later time. Concerning long and convoluted words: if I see a compound word built on an unknown 'ingredient' then I prefer learning the ingredient first - it is easier to remember long words if you already know the components. If I stumple over the pronunciation of a word then it is too early to learn it.

Unlike Khublei I haven't systematically jotted down words I miss in my inner monologue, but it would certainly be useful to to it - maybe less for single words than for expressions.


Edited by Iversen on 03 September 2010 at 10:41am



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