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Which Scandinavian language to study?

 Language Learning Forum : Skandinavisk & Nordisk Post Reply
169 messages over 22 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 16 ... 21 22 Next >>
tractor
Tetraglot
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Norway
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 Message 121 of 169
20 November 2012 at 9:10pm | IP Logged 
Medulin is right. "Radikal nynorsk" is Nynorsk that is close to "radikalt bokmål".
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NorwegianNYC
Triglot
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United States
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 Message 122 of 169
09 January 2013 at 6:08am | IP Logged 
Solfrid Cristin wrote:
Technically you are right that Bokmål is not a spoken language.
In actual fact, Standard Eastern Norwegian (the dialect spoken in and around Oslo and in
the larger part of Eastern Norway) is pretty much identical to Bokmål. To be frank I
think there are political reasons for not admitting that fact. Nynorsk does not have a
spoken variant since it is a sort of West Norwegian Esperanto. To make it "fair" the
same is said about Bokmål. I would be very interested in hearing what actual differences
could be found between the spoken and the written variant. I am not aware of any after
having spoken it for the good part of 50 years.
No - no one speaks bokmål
nomore speaking nynorsk. The only place in Norway you come close to hearing
bokmål spoken is in certain areas of Finnmark. The current trend of considering bokmål
akin to the Oslo dialect is rather a consequence of bokmål becoming more alike bokmål
than a supposed "Dano-Norwegian" origin of the Oslo dialect.

Edited by NorwegianNYC on 09 January 2013 at 6:08am

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Emily96
Diglot
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Canada
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 Message 123 of 169
26 March 2013 at 6:23am | IP Logged 
Do you think i could learn swedish, norwegian and danish in one year over the course of the next TAC?

I found Italian very easy to pick up since i already knew french and some Spanish, and if the scandinavian languages
are even more closely related, it should be even easier! Just the first one would be hard. Thoughts?

I'm also going to try to get some finnish in later this year. Maybe use the august 6WC to start with a bang.
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daegga
Tetraglot
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Austria
lang-8.com/553301
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 Message 124 of 169
27 March 2013 at 4:15pm | IP Logged 
@Emily96
It depends on your goals and the time you can put in, but I would say it's possible. But I think it's easier to do them after each other than in parallel.
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louisjanus
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NorwegianLanguage.inRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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 Message 125 of 169
27 March 2013 at 5:43pm | IP Logged 
I would advise AGAINST trying to become proficient speaker in all 3. It's generally unnecessary except for your own
ego satisfaction, Learn the basics of ONE --I recommend Norwegian which is sort of in the middle, and learn how
to modify to make your Norwegian as understandable as possible. Learning to understand them, OK, that's great,
and would basically take time and practice.

Then work on FInnish, which is fascinating in its own right. Maybe modern Icelandic too.
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jeff_lindqvist
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 Message 126 of 169
27 March 2013 at 5:52pm | IP Logged 
It might be possible. Passive knowledge yes. Active skills - I doubt it.

Note that they all are quite similar in writing (Danish and Norwegian VERY similar), but have quite different pronunciation (Norwegian and Swedish share some features, though). If you don't grasp the pronunciation of any of the three, you might end up speaking some kind of (broken) "Scandinavian" (not that it's a bad thing), and nobody will know which language you (are hoping to) speak.
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Fasulye
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fasulyespolyglotblog
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 Message 127 of 169
29 March 2013 at 8:31am | IP Logged 
jeff_lindqvist wrote:
It might be possible. Passive knowledge yes. Active skills - I doubt it.

Note that they all are quite similar in writing (Danish and Norwegian VERY similar), but have quite different pronunciation (Norwegian and Swedish share some features, though). If you don't grasp the pronunciation of any of the three, you might end up speaking some kind of (broken) "Scandinavian" (not that it's a bad thing), and nobody will know which language you (are hoping to) speak.


Yes, indeed! I fully agree with this statement.

Fasulye
1 person has voted this message useful



cordelia0507
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United Kingdom
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 Message 128 of 169
26 May 2013 at 9:23pm | IP Logged 
Emily96 wrote:
Do you think i could learn swedish, norwegian and danish in one year over the course of the next TAC?

I found Italian very easy to pick up since i already knew french and some Spanish, and if the scandinavian languages
are even more closely related, it should be even easier! Just the first one would be hard. Thoughts?

I'm also going to try to get some finnish in later this year. Maybe use the august 6WC to start with a bang.


There is no point learning all three. Just study the countries and take a look at the languages. Then pick the one that appeals to you the most.
Once you get good at it you'll be able to manage fine in the other countries too. Should you change your mind a few years down the line, you can easily transfer the skills you already acquired to the language you'd rather speak.. with almost no loss...

Norwegian: Cool country, rich country, lol! The in-between language in the Scandinavian family. Sounds cheerful.
Danish: Sounds very cool... Can be hard to prounounce. A nice choice for people who live near Denmark for example in Germany or the Netherlands.
Swedish: The largest languages of the three (but still not big by European standards). Also spoken in Finland, natively by some and as a solid second language by many. Sounds "melodic" according to non-natives.
Finnish - Go for it if you are up for a real challenge. It is not similar to the other languages AT ALL. (or any other language for that matter). One look at written Finnish will either scare you off for good, or get you completely hooked.


Edited by cordelia0507 on 26 May 2013 at 9:24pm



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