Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Scandinavian/Nordic Language Resources

 Language Learning Forum : Skandinavisk & Nordisk Post Reply
107 messages over 14 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 10 ... 13 14 Next >>


Fasulye
Heptaglot
Winner TAC 2012
Moderator
Germany
fasulyespolyglotblog
Joined 5721 days ago

5460 posts - 6006 votes 
1 sounds
Speaks: German*, DutchC1, EnglishB2, French, Italian, Spanish, Esperanto
Studies: Latin, Danish, Norwegian, Turkish
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 73 of 107
10 November 2011 at 8:24pm | IP Logged 
DANISH RESOURCES based on the German language

I would like to sum up all my study material here which I use to learn Danish. It's all bought in Germany and based on the German language. Not only interesting for native German speakers but also for L3 via L2 learners!

1. Lehrbuch mit Übungen Einstieg Dänisch, Hueber-Verlag, Level A1, mit 2 Audio CDs

2. Lehrbuch Vi snakkes ved + Arbeitsbuch Vi snakkes ved, Hueber-Verlag, Level A1/A2, mit 1 Audio CD
The second Audio CD for the textbook you have to buy extra.

3. Lehrbuch Dänisch neu + Arbeitsbuch Dänisch neu, Hueber-Verlag, Level A1/A2
2 Audio CDs have to be bought extra, they are not included in the books.

4. PONS Grammatik kurz & bündig Dänisch - einfach, verständlich, übersichtlich

5. As bilingual dictionaries I would strongly recommend to order the original Gyldendal-dictionaries from Denmark - they are absolutely the best you can use! :)

Fasulye

Edited by Fasulye on 10 November 2011 at 8:40pm

4 persons have voted this message useful



gaggilla
Tetraglot
Newbie
Switzerland
Joined 4891 days ago

18 posts - 28 votes
Speaks: German*, French, English, Romanian
Studies: Icelandic, Persian, Hungarian, Danish

 
 Message 74 of 107
26 November 2011 at 5:59pm | IP Logged 
at the university, we use "Av, min arm! - Dänisch für Deutschsprachige" for danish, which comes with a CD and an exercise book. It's okay, it manages to teach you a lot of vocabulary in a short time and has amusing lessons; on the other hand it seems rather unsystematic, not too well structured and sometimes a bit half-baked, especially in the vocabulary part, where very often old words are given again while new words are not explained at all, and also sometimes it doesn't give you all the relevant forms of a new word, even though it explicitly suggests you always learn all the forms, even if you don't know yet how to use them. Still, it's an okay textbook for classes, i don't think I would recommend it - at least not as a primary source - if you want to study on your own.
1 person has voted this message useful





Fasulye
Heptaglot
Winner TAC 2012
Moderator
Germany
fasulyespolyglotblog
Joined 5721 days ago

5460 posts - 6006 votes 
1 sounds
Speaks: German*, DutchC1, EnglishB2, French, Italian, Spanish, Esperanto
Studies: Latin, Danish, Norwegian, Turkish
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 75 of 107
19 December 2011 at 7:23pm | IP Logged 
gaggilla wrote:
at the university, we use "Av, min arm! - Dänisch für Deutschsprachige" for danish, which comes with a CD and an exercise book. It's okay, it manages to teach you a lot of vocabulary in a short time and has amusing lessons; on the other hand it seems rather unsystematic, not too well structured and sometimes a bit half-baked, especially in the vocabulary part, where very often old words are given again while new words are not explained at all, and also sometimes it doesn't give you all the relevant forms of a new word, even though it explicitly suggests you always learn all the forms, even if you don't know yet how to use them. Still, it's an okay textbook for classes, i don't think I would recommend it - at least not as a primary source - if you want to study on your own.


Thanks a lot for this book review, I saw this textbook on www.sprachwelt.de, it's good to to get to know some experiences of a learner of Danish. The books I listed up in my post above in this thread I can recommend for 100 % as I personally can work very well with them.

I personally prefer systematic and well-structured textbooks and workbooks.

Fasulye

Edited by Fasulye on 19 December 2011 at 7:24pm

1 person has voted this message useful



Rikyu-san
Diglot
Senior Member
Denmark
Joined 5402 days ago

213 posts - 413 votes 
Speaks: Danish*, English
Studies: German, French

 
 Message 76 of 107
16 March 2012 at 10:47am | IP Logged 
Thanks for all the good stuff. An update of the first post has been requrested. I will do that in a few weeks.

Best to all of you,

R.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Josquin
Heptaglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 4718 days ago

2266 posts - 3992 votes 
Speaks: German*, English, French, Latin, Italian, Russian, Swedish
Studies: Japanese, Irish, Portuguese, Persian

 
 Message 77 of 107
22 April 2012 at 4:01pm | IP Logged 
A very good and detailed grammatical overview of Icelandic is to be found here:

Kress, Bruno: Isländische Grammatik, VEB Verlag Enzyklopädie: Leipzig 1982.

An excellent presentation of Icelandic grammar, especially for German students of Icelandic. It is an academic reference work with detailed description of phonetic, morphological, and syntactical phenomenons. It is very exact and detailed and despite its date of publication still up to date. It's not for sale anymore - though perhaps in second-hand bookshops -, but might be obtainable through university libraries. Because of its detailed description of the Icelandic language, I recommend it for advanced learners only. The beginner might be overwhelmed by the complex grammatical structure of Icelandic as it is presented here.
3 persons have voted this message useful



csjc
Tetraglot
Newbie
IcelandRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 5474 days ago

20 posts - 36 votes
Speaks: English*, Icelandic, Modern Hebrew, Dutch
Studies: Norwegian, French, Japanese

 
 Message 78 of 107
28 April 2012 at 3:07am | IP Logged 
Kress' is the best grammar that exists for Icelandic, better than anything in English or even Icelandic itself. I use it
extensively despite struggling sometimes with the German explanations.
1 person has voted this message useful



Michael K.
Senior Member
United States
Joined 5603 days ago

568 posts - 886 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Spanish, Esperanto

 
 Message 79 of 107
28 April 2012 at 4:43pm | IP Logged 
I haven't read the whole thread, so I'm sorry if these have already been posted.


Icelandic audio course

Swedish A1-C course
2 persons have voted this message useful



Josquin
Heptaglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 4718 days ago

2266 posts - 3992 votes 
Speaks: German*, English, French, Latin, Italian, Russian, Swedish
Studies: Japanese, Irish, Portuguese, Persian

 
 Message 80 of 107
11 May 2012 at 9:45pm | IP Logged 
I have noticed there aren't any resources for Faroese yet. You can use Young's Faroese-English Dictionary (Føroysk-ensk orðabók) via Google Books for free. It's the best online resource for Faroese that I have found.

Other resources for Faroese:

W. B. Lockwood: An Introduction to Modern Faroese, Føroya Skúlabókagrunnur: Tórshavn 1977.

Hjalmar P. Petersen, Jonathan Adams: Faroese. A Language Course for Beginners, Stiðin: Tórshavn 2009.

Annfinnur í Skála, Jonhard Mikkelsen: Føroysk-ensk orðabók and Ensk-føroysk orðabók, Sprotin: Vestmanna 2007.

Höskuldur Þráinsson: Faroese. An Overview and Reference Grammar, Føroya Fróðskaparfelag: Tórshavn 2004.

Edited by Josquin on 11 May 2012 at 9:54pm



5 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 107 messages over 14 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.3887 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2024 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.