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Mutual Intelligibility in Slavic Language

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Delodephius
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Yugoslavia
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Speaks: Slovak*, Serbo-Croatian*, EnglishC1, Czech
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 Message 33 of 63
23 March 2010 at 10:55am | IP Logged 
stelingo wrote:
Delodephius wrote:
In my dialect we use pluperfect quite often. Maybe because of this I didn't notice that Slovaks in Slovakia don't use it so much. Interestingly, I don't think we use so much pluperfect because of Serbian influence because even Serbs use it very rarely.


Are there many Slovak speakers in Serbia?

About 50,000-60,000. We are the third largest ethnic group in Vojvodina (the northern province) after Serbs and Hungarians. Our language is one of the official languages of Vojvodina, a rare region in Europe that has so many. I've finished my entire education in Slovak, even my Serbian class teachers were Slovaks. We can also continue with tertiary education in Slovak. We have all the media available in Slovak and have a booming cultural life.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovaks_in_Vojvodina
As a sign of good faith this year the Slovak government made Serbs an ethnic minority in Slovakia, even though there are only a couple of thousand of them there with no Serbian settlements, unlike here in Vojvodina where there are many only-Slovak-speaking towns.
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ruskivyetr
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 Message 34 of 63
23 March 2010 at 11:03am | IP Logged 
Delodephius wrote:
stelingo wrote:
Delodephius wrote:
In my dialect we use
pluperfect quite often. Maybe because of this I didn't notice that Slovaks in Slovakia
don't use it so much. Interestingly, I don't think we use so much pluperfect because of
Serbian influence because even Serbs use it very rarely.


Are there many Slovak speakers in Serbia?

About 50,000-60,000. We are the third largest ethnic group in Vojvodina (the northern
province) after Serbs and Hungarians. Our language is one of the official languages of
Vojvodina, a rare region in Europe that has so many. I've finished my entire education
in Slovak, even my Serbian class teachers were Slovaks. We can also continue with
tertiary education in Slovak. We have all the media available in Slovak and have a
booming cultural life.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovaks_in_Vojvodina
As a sign of good faith this year the Slovak government made Serbs an ethnic minority
in Slovakia, even though there are only a couple of thousand of them there with no
Serbian settlements, unlike here in Vojvodina where there are many only-Slovak-
speaking towns.


I see that Hungarian, Pannonian Rusyn, and Romanian are official languages, as well as
Slovak and BCS. Are most people there trilingual or bilingual? What are the most
common pairs?

Edited by ruskivyetr on 23 March 2010 at 11:08am

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Delodephius
Bilingual Tetraglot
Senior Member
Yugoslavia
Joined 3760 days ago

342 posts - 501 votes 
Speaks: Slovak*, Serbo-Croatian*, EnglishC1, Czech
Studies: Russian, Japanese

 
 Message 35 of 63
23 March 2010 at 12:36pm | IP Logged 
Most people are bilingual. Everyone I know is at least bilingual in Slovak as native and Serbian as secondary, although most young people are trilingual since many like me fluently speak English, but there are also some who know more, mostly German (like my mom).

Most common pairs are with the minority languages as native and Serbian. Few native Serbian speakers speak another language while most minority speakers speak Serbian. Besides international languages some minority speakers also speak another minority language (coming from mixed towns or a mixed family).

Before WWII there were also a lot of Germans here, about 300.000. Actually, the situation here was very colourful. The town in which I live is Slovak. The town south of it is Serbian, the town east is Hungarian, and the town to the west was German (now it is Serbian, but it was also Greek for a few years).

Edited by Delodephius on 23 March 2010 at 12:38pm

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stelingo
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 Message 36 of 63
24 March 2010 at 12:32am | IP Logged 
Delodephius wrote:
stelingo wrote:
Delodephius wrote:
In my dialect we use pluperfect quite often. Maybe because of this I didn't notice that Slovaks in Slovakia don't use it so much. Interestingly, I don't think we use so much pluperfect because of Serbian influence because even Serbs use it very rarely.


Are there many Slovak speakers in Serbia?

About 50,000-60,000. We are the third largest ethnic group in Vojvodina (the northern province) after Serbs and Hungarians. Our language is one of the official languages of Vojvodina, a rare region in Europe that has so many. I've finished my entire education in Slovak, even my Serbian class teachers were Slovaks. We can also continue with tertiary education in Slovak. We have all the media available in Slovak and have a booming cultural life.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovaks_in_Vojvodina
As a sign of good faith this year the Slovak government made Serbs an ethnic minority in Slovakia, even though there are only a couple of thousand of them there with no Serbian settlements, unlike here in Vojvodina where there are many only-Slovak-speaking towns.


How do you find understanding spoken Czech?; I imagine,living in Serbia, you would have had less exposure to Cz than people living in Slovakia. I'd be interested to know if this affects your comprehension.
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Delodephius
Bilingual Tetraglot
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Yugoslavia
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Speaks: Slovak*, Serbo-Croatian*, EnglishC1, Czech
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 Message 37 of 63
24 March 2010 at 12:38am | IP Logged 
We have almost no exposure to Czech whatsoever. I can barely understand spoken Czech and when I start reading texts it takes a moment for me to get use to.

We are mostly used to Serbian. There is one particular thing about written Serbian though that might be interested to linguists. Serbian is written with two alphabets: Latin and Cyrillic. They are both used almost equally in all situations. Because of this many times we don't notice in which alphabet a text is written. Many times I found myself in a situation that I couldn't remember in what script I read a newspaper article five minutes ago. I was wondering what is the name of this phenomenon.

Edited by Delodephius on 24 March 2010 at 12:39am

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stelingo
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 Message 38 of 63
24 March 2010 at 12:44am | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:


Look at p. 206 of "Colloquial Slovak" (1997) for an example of pluperfect in Slovak.

Just for fun, I've also gone through my copy of "Colloquial Czech" (1999) which is also written by James Naughton and could find no mention about pluperfect nor a token example of it in Czech.


I bet there are not many people who would call reading through a Cz grammar book fun. :-).
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Chung
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 Message 39 of 63
24 March 2010 at 1:17am | IP Logged 
stelingo wrote:
Chung wrote:


Look at p. 206 of "Colloquial Slovak" (1997) for an example of pluperfect in Slovak.

Just for fun, I've also gone through my copy of "Colloquial Czech" (1999) which is also written by James Naughton and could find no mention about pluperfect nor a token example of it in Czech.


I bet there are not many people who would call reading through a Cz grammar book fun. :-).


Yes... but for some language geeks, what's not to like about reading a grammar book? haha
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ellasevia
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 Message 40 of 63
24 March 2010 at 3:07am | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:
stelingo wrote:
Chung wrote:


Look at p. 206 of "Colloquial Slovak" (1997) for an example of pluperfect in Slovak.

Just for fun, I've also gone through my copy of "Colloquial Czech" (1999) which is also written by James Naughton and could find no mention about pluperfect nor a token example of it in Czech.


I bet there are not many people who would call reading through a Cz grammar book fun. :-).


Yes... but for some language geeks, what's not to like about reading a grammar book? haha


I agree. I don't even study Czech (but I want to!), but reading a Czech grammar book would be immensely fun and entertaining for me. :)


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