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Chung
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Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 49 of 541
25 July 2011 at 7:23am | IP Logged 
I have completed Chapter 7 and was introduced to the illative singular, postpositions luusâ and lunne, the dual in present tense, and telling the time. I was also reminded that the locative in Inari Saami encompasses 4 locative cases in Finnish. For this unit, I also consulted the relevant sections in the notes on grammar hosted on the website of Ivalo Upper Secondary School since I sensed that my main textbook was omitting certain details about the grammar. In hindsight, this was a good decision since it saved me from some frustration when doing some of the translation exercises.

1) The illative case marks movement toward something or into something. The ending is usually -n but can vary depending on the word class.

If the stem has an -e- in the 2nd syllable, this -e- changes to -á- in illative singular.

- For nouns of 2 syllables, the ending in -n and it attches to a strengthened version of the stem based on the genitive/accusative form.

- For nouns of 3 and 4 syllables, the illative singular ending is -ân.

- For contracting nouns, the illative singular ending is -i or -s.

2) The locative singular ending is -st and deals with position or movement from a point (see message no. 48).

3) The postpositions luusâ and lunne correspond to the Finnish postpositions luo(kse) and luona respectively. As with their Finnish counterparts, these postpositions imply movement from a point and proximity to a point respectively. Lastly, the noun preceding either of these postpositions takes the genitive case.

4) Inari Saami uses the dual with muoi, tuoi and suoi meaning "we two", "you two", "they two" respectively. The rules for using the conjugational endings of the dual seem most elaborate for muoi and least elaborate for suoi.

To determine the present tense endings for verbs with muoi, everything depends on the number of syllables in the infinitive.

- For 2-syllable verbs, replace the -(V)Vđ of the final syllable with -een (if the infinitive has -â-, -e- or -i-) or -oon (if the infinitive has -o- or -u-) (N.B. V represents a vowel).

- For verbs of 3 or 4 syllables, replace -âđ or -iđ of the infinitive with -een.

- For contracting verbs, replace of the infinitive with -jeen. -jeen in turn changes the -i- of the stem to -e-.

The present tense ending for tuoi is -vettee but the stem to which it's attached can vary; I can't find a pattern for figuring out the stem after reading the grammar notes.

The present tense ending for suoi depends on the number of syllables in the infinitive, but the construction here is simpler than with muoi's endings.

- For verbs of 2 syllables and most contracting ones, replace of the infinitive with -v.

- For verbs of 3 syllables, replace -iđ of the infinitive with -ává.

Click here for tables illustrating the full pattern for conjugating verbs in present tense and here for relevant notes on the topic (pg. 23 of the document). Both sets of notes use Finnish as the intermediary language.

5) To tell the time on the hour, use Tijme lii [insert cardinal number here]. Ennuv-uv tijme lii? corresponds to "What time is it?" and has a parallel in the Finnish Paljonko kello on?.

Vocabulary of Chapter 7

For nouns, the first entry is in nom. sing., the second one in acc./gen. sing.

For adjectives, the first entry is the predicative form, the second on is attributive

For verbs, the first entry is in the infinitive, the second one in present tense for 1st person singular

áiguđ, ááigum - to intend to do sg
-bat - [emphasizing particle]
bussi, bussi - bus
čiččâd - seventh
ennuv - much
ennuv-uv lii? - how many of? how much of?
forgâ - soon
ij-uv moonâ - doesn't it go?
kaččâđ, kaačâm - to run
ko - when
lává - [they two] are
lunne - at (someone's home), by
luusâ - to (someone's home), towards
na - well (interjection)
opâtteijee - teacher
pááikán - [towards] home
päikki, pääihi - home
šat, šet - (any) more
talle ko - then at that time...
tijme, tijme - clock, o'clock; [the] time
väzziđ, váázám - to walk

Numerals 42-51 (i.e. number of the pages that cover chapter 7)

42 - neljilovkyehti
43 - neljilovkulmâ
44 - neljilovnelji
45 - neljilovvittâ
46 - neljilovkuttâ
47 - neljilovčiččâm
48 - neljilovkäävci
49 - neljilovoovce

50 - vittlov
51 - vittlovohtâ

Examples of Inari Saami taken from selected answers to the exercises.

Translate into Inari Saami (sentences translated from original Finnish into English)

1) Anna intends to go home. > Ánná áigu moonnâđ pááikán.
2) He/She is running to the bus. > Sun káččá buusi luusâ.
3) The bus is leaving soon. > Bussi vuálgá forgâ.
4) Matti is no longer in the school. > Matti ij lah šat škoovlâ.
5) What are you doing? [sing.] > Maid tun poorgah?
6) He/she is going to the yellow house. > Sun mana fiskis tuve luusâ.
7) Are you coming in? [sing.] > Puáđáh-uv siisâ?
8) Who is sitting in the car? > Kii čokkáá avdost?
9) Whose place [home] are you at [sing.]? > Kiän lunne lah?
10) Lemet is running to the house. > Lemet káččá tupán.
11) The two of them are sitting in the boat. > Suoi čokkáv kárbást.

Edited by Chung on 05 August 2011 at 5:13pm

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Kafea
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Studies: Smi

 
 Message 50 of 541
26 July 2011 at 8:13pm | IP Logged 
I thought time-telling was very daunting. You make it look do-able.



Chung
Diglot
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 Message 51 of 541
27 July 2011 at 6:04am | IP Logged 
Kafea wrote:
I thought time-telling was very daunting. You make it look do-able.


It doesn't seem too bad especially when things are on the hour since I don't need to worry about "half past..." or "[insert x minutes here] past/to [insert hour y here]" etc.

I also think that the structural similarity to how it's done in Estonian and Finnish makes it less daunting as I've grown used to it. I don't intend to harp on the point, but really having some background in those languages (and to a limited extent Hungarian) has been helpful in sorting out some of the intricacies that I've seen so far in Inari Saami. This also means that I'm especially impressed with anyone who starts learning a Saamic language without any background in an Uralic language. Learning any Saamic language could drive the unprepared learner nuts.

Take a look at Chapter 11 of Davvin 1 since it shows how to tell the time in Northern Saami. The method in Northern Saami is similar to what's in Inari Saami (and Estonian and Finnish). At its simplest, one says: "Time is [insert cardinal number here]". I've translated the examples in Davvin 1 into Inari Saami, Finnish and English for comparison's sake.

[Northern Saami ~ Inari Saami ~ Finnish]

- Olugo diibmu lea? ~ Ennuv-uv tijme lii? ~ Paljonko kello on? - What time is it? (in all languages it's literally "How much time/clock is [it]?")

- Diibmu lea golbma ~ Tijme lii kulmâ ~ Kello on kolme - It's 3:00

- Diibmu lea beal vihtta ~ Tijme lii pel vittâ ~ Kello on puoli viisi - It's 4:30 ("half [to] five")

- Diibmu lea njealjádas váile čieža ~ Tijme lii vittânubáloh vááijuv čiččâm ~ Kello on neljännestä/viittätoista vaille seitsemän - It's 6:45 ("It's quarter/fifteen to seven" - Davvin shows "quarter to seven" while I've learned "fifteen-to-seven" for Inari Saami. I know of both forms in Finnish.)

- Diibmu lea vihtta badjel ovcci ~ Tijme lii vittâ paijeel oovce ~ Kello on viisi yli yhdeksän - It's 9:05 ("It's five past nine")

- Diibmu lea logi váile okta ~ Tijme lii love vááijuv ohtâ ~ Kello on kymmentä vaille yksi - It's 12:50 ("It's ten to one")

- Diibmu lea vihtta badjel beal logi ~ Tijme lii kyehtilovvittâ vááijuv love ~ Kello on viisi yli puoli kymmentä/kaksikymmentäviittä vaille kymmenen - It's 9:35 (Davvin shows "five past half [to] ten" for Northern Saami while I've learned "25 to ten" in Inari Saami. I've learned both conventions in Finnish but because of my English wiring, I prefer the structure of "[insert no. of minutes] to [insert nearest hour]" when talking about time between :31 and :59 (inclusive) of a given hour.)
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Chung
Diglot
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 Message 52 of 541
30 July 2011 at 10:07pm | IP Logged 
I have completed Chapter 8 and was introduced to the full conjugation of the negative verb in present tense singular for verbs other than olla "to be" and the interrogative pronoun kuábáš "which".

1) The stem used in the negative construction depends broadly on the number of syllables in the infinitive

There is a tendency for this stem to be derived from the conjugated form of the 1st person singular in present tense. However, I've already encountered several verbs that don't quite follow this pattern and am struggling to make sense of it or derive a reliable rule for forming it.

e.g.

moonnâđ "to go"

mun moonâm "I go"

jiem moonâ "I don't go"
jieh moonâ "you don't go"
ij moonâ "he/she doesn't go"

čäälliđ "to write"

mun čálám "I write"

jiem čääli "I don't write"
jieh čääli "you don't write"
ij čääli "he/she doesn't write"

västidiđ "to answer"

mun västidâm "I answer"

jiem västid "I don't answer"
jieh västid "you don't answer"
ij västid "he/she doesn't answer"

2) The interrogative pronoun kuábáš corresponds to "which" and can decline in alignment with the modified nominal

Vocabulary of Chapter 8

For nouns, the first entry is in nom. sing., the second one in acc./gen. sing.

For adjectives, the first entry is the predicative form, the second on is attributive

For verbs, the first entry is in the infinitive, the second one in present tense for 1st person singular

aassâđ, aasâm - to live/dwell
čuovjâd, čuovjis - blue
forgâ - soon, immediately
káávcád - eigth
kuábáš - which
kuábbáá - [of] which (gen. sing.)
maiden - anything (partitive)
orroođ, orom - to be, stay
páárnáš, párnáá - child
pel, peeli - half
puáttiđ, puáđám - to come
pääihist - at home
ruánáá - green (attributive)
ruánásub - greener
tobbeen - there (place just referred to)
tot - it
tom - it (acc.)
ton - its (gen.)
vest - again

Numerals 52-57 (i.e. number of the pages that cover chapter 8)

52 - vittlovkyehti
53 - vittlovkulmâ
54 - vittlovnelji
55 - vittlovvittâ
56 - vittlovkuttâ
57 - vittlovčiččâm

Examples of Inari Saami taken from selected answers to the exercises.

Create questions from the statements given

1) Mun aasâm Pierâ lunne. > Kiän lunne tun aasah?
2) Ánná áásá ruánáá tuuveest. > Kuábbáá tuuveest Ánná áásá?
3) Tijme lii käävci. > Ennuv-uv tijme lii?
4) Taa lává kyehti párnáá. > Kalle párnáá taa láá?
5) Kooveest lii käärbis. > Mii kooveest lii?
6) Ááigum škoovlân. > Kuus tun ááíguh?
7) Matti puátá pááíkán? > Kii puátá pááíkán?

Edited by Chung on 05 August 2011 at 5:14pm

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Chung
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 Message 53 of 541
31 July 2011 at 6:31pm | IP Logged 
I have completed Chapter 9 and learned about a gerund marked by the suffix -min.

1) Adding -min to a verb's stem is used with the present tense of "to be" to indicate action occurring at the moment of its use. This is comparable to the examples of "I am going" (as opposed to "I go") and the Finnish olen menossa "I am going" (as opposed to minä menen "I go").

To form the required stem that receives the suffix, consider if there are more than two syllables or the stem is a contracting verb. In these instances, attach -min to a stem that is based on the verb in 3rd person singular in present tense.

Otherwise (i.e. a verb of 2 syllables that is not a contracting one), remove of the infinitive suffix and shorten diphtongs or gemination in the stem where possible. Attach -min to the resultant modified stem.

So far, the rule as I've been shown in the grammar notes available to me seems reliable enough. The tricky parts are to remember to do the correct modifications for non-contracting verbs of 2 syllables or to recall the form for the 3rd person singular in present tense.

Vocabulary of Chapter 9

For nouns, the first entry is in nom. sing., the second one in acc./gen. sing.

For adjectives, the first entry is the predicative form, the second on is attributive

For verbs, the first entry is in the infinitive, the second one in present tense for 1st person singular

aavis - newspaper [form in gen. sing. not given]
eenâb - more
enni, eeni - mother
huáppu - haste
juuhâđ, juuvâm - to drink
kievkân, kievkkân - kitchen
kissá, kisá - cat
käähvi - coffee [form in gen. sing. not given]
niälgum - hungry [predicative form]
nuuvt - so, thus
onne - today
oovcád - ninth
peivipurâmuš - [of] dinner [form in nom. sing. not given]
peivi, peeivi - day
porgâmin - doing
purâdiđ, purâdâm - to eat
tääbbin - here

Numerals 58-63 (i.e. number of the pages that cover chapter 9)

58 - vittlovkäävci
59 - vittlovoovce

60 - kuttlov
61 - kuttlovohtâ
62 - kuttlovkyehti
63 - kuttlovkulmâ

Examples of Inari Saami taken from selected answers to the exercises.

Fill in the blank with the gerund of the following verbs

1) luuhađ: Suoi lává luhâmin.
2) čokkáđ: Sun lii čokkáámin.
3) kaččâđ: Suoi lává kaččâmin.
4) mááláđ: Sun lii mááláámin.
5) väzziđ: Suoi lává väzzimin.
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Chung
Diglot
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 Message 54 of 541
01 August 2011 at 8:54pm | IP Logged 
I have completed Chapter 10 and learned about the imperative for 2nd person singular, the role of tot "it" and the plural personal pronouns.

1) The imperative for 2nd person singular sometimes resembles the stem used in the negative verb conjugation in present tense. The negative form is indicated by placing ele before this stem.

e.g.

čäälliđ "to write"
jiem čääli "I don't write"

čääli! "write!"
ele čääli! "don't write!"

2) The demonstrative pronoun tot "it" is often used in a similar way as sun "he/she". From what I gather sun refers to a human while tot refers to anything else.

3) The personal pronouns in Inari Saami are:

1st, 2nd, 3rd

mun, tun, sun (sing.)
muoi, tuoi, suoi (dual)
mij, tij, sij (plur.)

tot "it", toh "they"/"these"/"those"


Therefore the partial declension of the personal pronouns is:

NOM., ACC., GEN., LOC., ILL.
mun, muu, muu, must, munjin
tun, tuu, tuu, tust, tunjin
sun, suu, suu, sust, sunjin

muoi, munnuu, munnuu, munnust, munnui
tuoi, tunnuu, tunnuu, tunnust, tunnui
suoi, sunnuu, sunnuu, suunust, sunnui

mij, mii, mii, mist, mijjân
tij, tii, tii, tist, tijjân
sij, sii, sii, sist, sijjân

Vocabulary of Chapter 10

For nouns, the first entry is in nom. sing., the second one in acc./gen. sing.

For adjectives, the first entry is the predicative form, the second on is attributive

For verbs, the first entry is in the infinitive, the second one in present tense for 1st person singular

adeliđ, adelâm - to give
ele adde! - don't give! [2nd pers. sing.]
ele - don't [imperative 2nd pers. sing.]
kiäh - who [nom. plur.]
leibi, leeibi - bread
lovváád - tenth
luuhâđ, luuvâm - to read
lättee - floor [form in gen. sing. not given]
lättest - on the floor
mielkki, mielhi - milk
mist - at/in/on us
orroođ, orom - to be [position rather than existence]
piärgu, piärgu - meat
potás, pottáás - potato
potáseh - potatoes
puáđi! - come! [2nd pers. sing.]
purrâđ, puurâm - to eat
purrâmâš - food [form in gen. sing. not given]
tast - there [position on/in place already mentioned]
teehin - here [movement towards speaker]

Numerals 64-70 (i.e. number of the pages that cover chapter 10)

64 - kuttlovnelji
65 - kuttlovvittâ
66 - kuttlovkuttâ
67 - kuttlovčiččâm
68 - kuttlovkäävci
69 - kuttlovoovce

70 - čiččâmlov

Examples of Inari Saami taken from selected answers to the exercises.

Write sentences in the illative or locative using the answers from the previous exercise.

- Kii kievkânist lii?
- Kissáást lii kyeli.
- Adelâm kiisán piärgu.
- Lättest ij lah mielkki.
- Mun kaačâm muu tupán.

Edited by Chung on 05 August 2011 at 5:16pm

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Chung
Diglot
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 Message 55 of 541
01 August 2011 at 10:54pm | IP Logged 
I have now completed "Sämikielâ 1" and for the time being I am satisfied with what I've accomplished over the past three and a half weeks. The scarcity of self-study materials for Inari Saami and my ongoing difficulties in making regular contact with native speakers are also discouraging me from additional study at this time.

I'll likely stay on the "Saamic track" for at least the rest of the year but switch to Northern Saami given that I have access to some material in hard copies (e.g. Davvin 1-4) in addition to free material available online at Davvi Girji and Gulahalan. On the other hand, I'm anxious to devote more time to the other languages that I've been studying (especially Finnish) since I feel that they've been pushed even further aside by my recent work on Inari Saami. This means that I don't expect to devote as much time per week for Northern Saami as I did for Inari Saami even though I do expect to study Northern Saami for more than three and a half weeks.

I came away with the following impressions after having finished this short course in Inari Saami.

1) At least some background in Finnish is very helpful for learning Inari Saami not only because of the inherent "discount" but also because all learning material of Inari Saami as a second language that I've found so far uses Finnish as the intermediary language. This second point isn't surprising upon realizing that Inari Saami is used natively only within a small part of northeastern Finland.

2) Inari Saami relies heavily on fusional typology to makes morphological distinctions as shown with its many vocalic and consonantal alternations. A learner can find it very difficult to get used to this method and may be forced to do much memorization or drilling to master the forms and so express him/herself correctly in Inari Saami.

3) Because of the complexity of the alternations, and lack so far of materials designed for an independent learner, enlisting the help of a native speaker is strongly recommended (difficult as it may be to find such a person outside far northeastern Finland!). The best material that I could find is meant for students in a classroom and thus lacks answer keys. A teacher would be helpful not only in correcting exercises but also in clarifying the criteria used in inflection or helping to fill gaps in a textbook. I found that the notes that I was using didn't seem to explain everything clearly while the textbook sometimes assumed knowledge of vocabulary that I had not learned yet.


***


The brevity of "Sämikielâ 1" which I used, did not include anything about greetings, courtesies, counting larger numbers or full conjugation in the present tense (to say nothing about past tense).

For completeness' sake, here is some stuff that I wish "Sämikielâ 1" had also included and is taken from the online textbook hosted at Ivalo Upper Secondary School.

1) Greetings

- a) All-purpose

Pyeri peivi! "Hello!, Good day!"
Tiervâpuáttim! "Welcome!"
Tiervâ! "Hi!"
Mii kulloo? "How are you?" [What hears?]
Pyeri kulloo! "I'm fine" [[It] hears good]
Pyeri iiđeed! "Good morning!"
Pyeri eehid! "Good evening!"
Pyeri ijjâ! "Good night!" [said only when going to bed or departing at night]

- b) When greeting someone with handshakes

Initiating speaker: Na, tiervâ Matti! "Well, hello Matti!"
Matti: Na, tiervâ tiervâ! "Well, hello hello!"

2) Taking leave

- a) In person

Moonâ tiervân! [addressed to the person who is leaving]
Pääsi tiervân! [addressed to the person who is staying]

Mannee tiervân! [addressed to the two people who are leaving]
Päccee tiervân! [addressed to the two people who are staying]

Moonnâđ tiervân! [addressed to more than two people who are leaving]
Pääcciđ tiervân! [addressed to more than two people who are staying]

- b) On the phone or in a letter or email

Ele tiervân! [addressed to one person]
Ellee tiervân! [addressed to two people]
Eelliđ tiervân [addressed to more than two people]

N.B. tiervân seems to be related to the greeting Tiervâ!, and the Finnish greeting Terve! and a derivative terveys "health". The forms in Inari Saami would thus evoke the idea of a wish for good health to the addressee(s).

3) Gratitude

Takkâ! / Kijtto! "Thank you!"
Kijttoseh "Thanks!"
Te takkâ! / Takkâ ennuv! "Thank you very much!"

Pyerrin liävus! "You're welcome!"
Pyeri lii! "You're welcome!" [~ Be good]
Ijbâ mihheen kijttámušâid! "Don't mention it!" [~ There is nothing to thank for]

4) Numbers beyond 70

80 kähcilov; 90 ohcelov

100 čyeti; 101 čyetiohtâ; 110 čyetilove; 111 čyetiohtânubáloh

200 kyehtičyeti; 300 kulmâčyeti; 400 neljičyeti; 500 vittâčyeti; 600 kuttâčyeti; 700 čiččâmčyettid; 800 käävcičyettid; 900 oovcečyettid

1 000 tuhháát; 5 000 vittâtuhháát; 7 000 čiččâmtuháttid

1 000 000 miljovn

5) Present tense endings for plural personal pronouns and examples of conjugation patterns (see message nos. 46 and 49 for comments on present tense endings for singular and dual respectively).

N.B. The following is per my understanding of the notes from the online textbook of Inari Saami and I do not guarantee accuracy of the obervations and patterns below

All verbs attach -p to a stem for affirmative present tense of mij "we" (plural). This stem is often the infinitive form without the final .

All verbs attach -vetteđ to a stem for affirmative present tense of tij "you" (plural). This stem is sometimes the infinitive form without the final

Non-contracting verbs attach -h to a stem for affirmative present tense of sij "they" (plural). This stem can be difficult to predict as it tends to be based on the stem used in 3rd person singular or dual, but isn't always identical.

Contracing verbs attach -jeh to a stem for affirmative present tense of sij "they" (plural). This stem is the infinitive form without the final . Where applicable, the ending -jeh also changes the stem's final -i- to -e-.


Examples of verb conjugation in present tense

čäälliđ "to write"

1st pers., 2nd pers., 3rd pers.

mun čálám, tun čáláh, sun čáálá (singular, affirmative)
mun ij čääli, tun ij čääli, sun ij čääli (singular, negative)

muoi čälleen, tuoi čälivettee, suoi čäälliv (dual, affirmative)
muoi iän čääli, tuoi eppee čääli, suoi iävá čääli (dual, negative)

mij čäällip, tij čälivetteđ, sij čäälih (plural, affirmative)
mij ep čääli, tij eppeđ čääli, sij iä čääli (plural, negative)


leđe "to be"

1st pers., 2nd pers., 3rd pers.

mun lam, tun lah, sun lii (singular, affirmative)
mun ij lah, tun ij lah, sun ij lah (singular, negative)

muoi láán, tuoi leppee, suoi lává (dual, affirmative)
muoi iän lah, tuoi eppee lah, suoi iävá lah (dual, negative)

mij lep, tij leppeđ, sij láá (plural, affirmative)
mij ep lah, tij eppeđ lah, sij iä lah (plural, negative)


luuhâđ "to read"

1st pers., 2nd pers., 3rd pers.

mun luuvâm, tun luuvah, sun lohá (singular, affirmative)
mun ij luuvâ, tun ij luuvâ, sun ij luuvâ (singular, negative)

muoi lohheen, tuoi luhâvetteđ, suoi luuhâv (dual, affirmative)
muoi iän luuvâ, tuoi eppee luuvâ, suoi iävá luuvâ (dual, negative)

mij luuhâp, tij luhâvetteđ, sij luuhâp (plural, affirmative)
mij ep luuvâ, tij eppeđ luuvâ, sij iä luuvâ (plural, negative)


moonnâđ "to go"

1st pers., 2nd pers., 3rd pers.

mun moonâm, tun moonah, sun mana (singular, affirmative)
mun ij moonâ, tun ij moonâ, sun ij moonâ (singular, negative)

muoi manneen, tuoi monâvettee, suoi moonnâv (dual, affirmative)
muoi iän moonâ, tuoi eppee moonâ, suoi iävá moonâ (dual, negative)

mij moonnâp, tij monâvetteđ, sij maneh (plural, affirmative)
mij ep moonâ, tij eppeđ moonâ, sij iä moonâ (plural, negative)


porgađ "to do"

1st pers., 2nd pers., 3rd pers.

mun poorgâm, tun poorgah, sun parga (singular, affirmative)
mun ij poorgâ, tun ij poorgâ, sun ij poorgâ (singular, negative)

muoi pargeen, tuoi porgâvettee, suoi porgâv (dual, affirmative)
muoi iän poorgâ, tuoi eppee poorgâ, suoi iävá poorgâ (dual, negative)

mij porgâp, tij porgâvetteđ, sij pargeh (plural, affirmative)
mij ep poorgâ, tij eppeđ poorgâ, sij iä poorgâ (plural, negative)


purâdiđ "to eat"

1st pers., 2nd pers., 3rd pers.

mun purâdâm, tun purâdah, sun puurâd (singular, affirmative)
mun ij puurâd, tun ij puurâd, sun ij puurâd (singular, negative)

muoi purâdeen, tuoi puurâdvettee, suoi purâdává (dual, affirmative)
muoi iän puurâd, tuoi eppee puurâd, suoi iävá puurâd (dual, negative)

mij purâdep, tij puurâdvetteđ, sij purâdeh (plural, affirmative)
mij ep puurâd, tij eppeđ puurâd, sij iä puurâd (plural, negative)

***

Despite all of the difficulties, I'm glad that I studied some Inari Saami and encourage anyone with sufficient interest or motivation to give it a whirl. It can feel somewhat inspiring to learn a seriously endangered language; especially when it's taught in an intermediary language in which one is not fluent. Sometimes the joy of discovery or the process of learning are just as rewarding as mastery or acheiving fluency.
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Kafea
Groupie
United States
Joined 2192 days ago

78 posts - 20 votes
Speaks: English*
Studies: Smi

 
 Message 56 of 541
02 August 2011 at 4:19am | IP Logged 
You have done a great job with learning quite a bit in a few weeks, and organizing what you have learned. Thank you for sharing this!

I definitely see many similarities with North Saami. The pronunciations are very similar even if the spellings are different (b instead of p, etc.)
It does look like knowing at least some Finnish was helpful. I think you will find North Saami easier for knowing some Finnish and some Inari Saami. Good for you in tackling this. It helps to create energy for others of us who are working to learn.



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