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German spin-offs

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31 messages over 4 pages: 1 2 3 4  Next >>
Heart of Oak
Newbie
Scotland
Joined 4713 days ago

19 posts - 20 votes
Speaks: English*
Studies: German

 
 Message 1 of 31
27 July 2010 at 1:16am | IP Logged 
I've started learning German and I was wondering if there are any languages that I will be able to pick up really quickly once I have mastered German?

For instance, I have heard that if you are fluent in Spanish, then Portugese is a lot easier to learn (and presumably vice versa), similarly with the Scandanavian languages that have similarities to each other.
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mrhenrik
Triglot
Moderator
Norway
Joined 5540 days ago

482 posts - 658 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English, French
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 2 of 31
27 July 2010 at 1:24am | IP Logged 
Dutch and the Scandinavian languages come to mind, Dutch more so. Most words will be very
similar to a word in either German or English, so you'd get a major head start there.
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johntm93
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4788 days ago

587 posts - 746 votes 
2 sounds
Speaks: English*
Studies: German, Spanish

 
 Message 3 of 31
27 July 2010 at 3:35am | IP Logged 
Dutch, and other Germanic languages for the most part; probably Frisian, Yiddish, the Scandis should be a little easier. Luxembourgish would be easier too.
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tracker465
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4813 days ago

355 posts - 496 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: German, Spanish, Dutch

 
 Message 4 of 31
27 July 2010 at 7:44am | IP Logged 
Dutch is very easy, I could understand a lot written before I even began studying it. When learning Dutch (Afrikaans is the same way), there is so many similarities to English and German, that it is not so difficult to pick up.

With the Scandinavian tongues, they are a bit further out than the relationship between German and Dutch, but there are also many similarities. If I push myself, I can pick out some text and understand a fair bit, though not nearly to the level that I can understand Dutch via German. Still easy to learn though, when you have the others.
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Marc Frisch
Heptaglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 6126 days ago

1001 posts - 1169 votes 
Speaks: German*, French, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Turkish, Italian
Studies: Persian, Tamil

 
 Message 5 of 31
27 July 2010 at 11:05pm | IP Logged 
Dutch, Afrikaans, Norwegian, Danish and Swedish are all pretty easy if you've got German (and the other way round). I actually consider Luxembourgish to be a dialect of German, not a separate language, as I can immediately communicate with someone only speaking Luxembourgish (however, I grew up very close to Luxembourg and our local dialect is very close to Luxembourgish...)
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Romanist
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 4743 days ago

261 posts - 366 votes 
Studies: Italian

 
 Message 6 of 31
27 July 2010 at 11:39pm | IP Logged 
As has been said, knowing German will give you a fairly big discount in learning Dutch/Afrikaans and Swedish/Danish/Norwegian (including all dialects.)

German will also give you a certain amount of discount with learning Old Norse/Icelandic - languages which would otherwise be every bit as difficult as Russian!
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Heart of Oak
Newbie
Scotland
Joined 4713 days ago

19 posts - 20 votes
Speaks: English*
Studies: German

 
 Message 7 of 31
28 July 2010 at 12:06am | IP Logged 
Thanks guys, it sounds as if Dutch may be somewhere in my future by the sound of it. What about Hungarian? Is Hungarian more Slavic than Germanic?
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feanarosurion
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 4742 days ago

217 posts - 316 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Finnish, Norwegian

 
 Message 8 of 31
28 July 2010 at 12:11am | IP Logged 
No Hungarian isn't even in the Indo-European family. It's got quite a few slavic influences, but it's actually in the Ugric branch of the Uralic family. You're not going to get any help with Hungarian from German, or even any other Indo-European language, in my opinion. I don't mean to discourage you, but if you were to tackle Hungarian, you'd pretty much need to start from scratch.


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