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Names And Their Meanings

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mr_chinnery
Senior Member
England
Joined 3840 days ago

202 posts - 297 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: French

 
 Message 17 of 58
12 February 2011 at 2:03am | IP Logged 
Ertan wrote:
In this topic we will write our name and it's English meaning.
we may find synonym of our names.

Let's start
my name is Ertan Andaç

Ertan;means dawn, daybreak
Andaç;means memento.


My first name is Matthew, which is of hebrew origin and means gift of God. I constantly
remind my girlfriend of this :)

My surname is Ford, which in English means a crossing place in a river. Not a bridge,
but a natural heightening of the river bed, which makes it passable on foot, horse,
camel, land rover, whatever :)

So, a pretty spectacular first name and a rather drab surname for me.
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mr_chinnery
Senior Member
England
Joined 3840 days ago

202 posts - 297 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: French

 
 Message 18 of 58
12 February 2011 at 2:04am | IP Logged 
Lucky Charms wrote:
I'm really interested in names as well, so I'm looking forward to
the contributions in this thread!

My name is Brianna Mackenzie Forster.

Brianna is a feminine form of Brian, an Irish name that's supposed to mean something
like 'strong' (perhaps related to the English 'brawny'?)

MacKenzie is the name of a Scottish clan.

(My mom chose my first and middle name for the sound and the trendiness factor; sadly,
there's no special significance behind these choices!)

Forster is a German name indicating that my ancestors were occupied in forestry.



http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Forster
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akprocks
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United States
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Studies: German

 
 Message 19 of 58
12 February 2011 at 2:44am | IP Logged 
Dylan is a welsh name which means of the tide. In Google translate on modern welsh 'y llanw' is of the tide. Freeman is the name of a class of free men of fedual England.

However I don't know what Corel means, it dosen't mean the reef and it comes from my great-grandfather had a french last name if that helps.
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Mauritz
Octoglot
Senior Member
Sweden
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Speaks: Swedish*, EnglishC2, Italian, Spanish, Russian, Turkish, Esperanto, French
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 Message 20 of 58
13 February 2011 at 12:56pm | IP Logged 
My name is a fairly standard Scandinavian name with a nice meaning. Mu first name Erik
means something like "alone ruler" or "eternal ruler". My last name is Svärd and it
simply means "sword". I could be a dictator...
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cymrotom
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United States
cymrympls.blogspot.c
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 Message 21 of 58
16 February 2011 at 6:00pm | IP Logged 
Here's some info on Dylan from wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dylan_Eil_Ton

Etymology
The etymology of the name Dylan is somewhat complex. In Welsh, there is a bound item dylanw- which appears in dylanwad ‘influence,’ dylanwadol ‘influential’ and dylanwadu ‘to influence’.[3][4] This element dylanw- appears itself to be a compound of the prefix dy- and the noun llanw ‘tidal flow’.[5] The prefix dy- appears in numerous words in Welsh and is reconstructed in Proto-Celtic as *dī- with the meaning of ‘off, away’.[6] The item llanw is reconstructed in Proto-Celtic as *φlanwo- ‘flood, filling.’ This *φlanwo- may plausibly have had a reduced form *φlanu- ‘flood.’ This etymology is echoed in the following Gaelic (Irish) words:

[tuinne] nf. in : gob na tuinne, the water edge
[tòn] nf. g. tòine; d. tòin; pl.+an, the fundament
[tonn] nm. g.v. tuinn; pl.+an and tuinn, wave, surge, billow
Alone, the Welsh element dy can mean ‘thy, thine’ or rather ‘your’ (singular) but there is no gloss of this word meaning ‘great,’ as the most cursory glance at the Welsh dictionary proves.[7] The name Dylan, then, can be maintained to be the descendant of a compound of Proto-Celtic elements *dī- φlanu-s which together basically mean something in context relative to one of the following:

‘The flood that recedes’

'The wave that floods'

'The tide that returns'



akprocks wrote:
Dylan is a welsh name which means of the tide. In Google translate on modern welsh 'y llanw' is of the tide. Freeman is the name of a class of free men of fedual England.

However I don't know what Corel means, it dosen't mean the reef and it comes from my great-grandfather had a french last name if that helps.


Edited by cymrotom on 16 February 2011 at 6:01pm

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hrhenry
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United States
languagehopper.blogs
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 Message 22 of 58
16 February 2011 at 6:50pm | IP Logged 
I'll go through my family's last names. Like a lot of other names in the US, some have changed when my ancestors passed through Ellis Island.

Henry: Shortened from McHenery when they came to America, meaning has already been discussed.

Bruhn: Did not change when my great-grandfather came over from Denmark - it means brown. He married a German girl here with the last name of Diehl. I can't find anything on that surname, other than a note that it was a pet form of a personal name.

Olson: Did not change when my great-grandparents came over from Norway - son of Ole/Olaf, which in turn means ancestral relic, from what I understand, but correct me if someone knows a more precise origin.

Shafer: Changed from Schäfer when my great-great-grandparents came over from Germany, means Shepherd.

R.
==
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Segata
Triglot
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Germany
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 Message 23 of 58
16 February 2011 at 10:39pm | IP Logged 
My surname is "Voßmann". Voß is the low German (Platt) word for "fox".
So I guess my ancestors were either red-haired or.. uh.. cunning?
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Dragomanno
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Zimbabwe
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 Message 24 of 58
16 March 2011 at 1:06am | IP Logged 
Nice thread! My name is Francesco, which is an old Italian word for "French". On its turn, "French" comes from the Germanic word "frank" meaning free.

Edited by Dragomanno on 16 March 2011 at 1:28am



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