Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Listening from the beginning

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
70 messages over 9 pages: 13 4 5 6 7 ... 2 ... 8 9 Next >>
ChiaBrain
Bilingual Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 3882 days ago

402 posts - 512 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish*
Studies: Portuguese, Italian, French
Studies: German

 
 Message 9 of 70
12 May 2011 at 8:16pm | IP Logged 
Great post.

I wonder if its not a bad idea to invest in multiple beginner to intermediate learning
kits with audio when theres a lack of broadcasts in that (beginner to intermediate)
range.

Edited by ChiaBrain on 12 May 2011 at 8:20pm

2 persons have voted this message useful



leosmith
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4624 days ago

2365 posts - 3803 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Tagalog

 
 Message 10 of 70
13 May 2011 at 3:18am | IP Logged 
Thank you all very much for your kind comments. I'm truly humbled.

Shadowzerg wrote:
Thank you leosmith. I really appreciate your posting this. Do you have any suggestion for a
certain time-frame in which one could expect to see big improvement? In listening comprehension that is.


No I don't. I consider that minimum of 10 minutes a day to be more of a preventative measure against a deficiency
in understanding, rather than a recipe for excellence. Practice it, and you won't have the problem that is so common
among beginning language learners.
3 persons have voted this message useful



Lucky Charms
Diglot
Senior Member
Japan
lapacifica.net
Joined 5023 days ago

752 posts - 1710 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese
Studies: German, Spanish

 
 Message 11 of 70
13 May 2011 at 5:30am | IP Logged 
It's probably not completely necessary, but I also find it helpful to practice shadowing
from the beginning (although at first it's only possible with a few 1-word snippets every
minute). For one thing, it keeps me focused on listening so that I don't zone out, and
for another thing, it allows me to practice pronunciation without my perception of
certain sounds being colored by how they're written. It also gets my mouth used to
certain movements, like a trill followed by a dental fricative, or an "a" that's a little
more back and rounded than in English, etc.
3 persons have voted this message useful



Arekkusu
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Canada
bit.ly/qc_10_lec
Joined 3455 days ago

3971 posts - 7745 votes 
Speaks: English, French*, GermanC1, Spanish, Japanese, Esperanto
Studies: Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Estonian

 
 Message 12 of 70
13 May 2011 at 3:40pm | IP Logged 
leosmith wrote:
Thank you all very much for your kind comments. I'm truly humbled.

Shadowzerg wrote:
Thank you leosmith. I really appreciate your posting this. Do you have any suggestion for a
certain time-frame in which one could expect to see big improvement? In listening comprehension that is.


No I don't. I consider that minimum of 10 minutes a day to be more of a preventative measure against a deficiency
in understanding, rather than a recipe for excellence. Practice it, and you won't have the problem that is so common
among beginning language learners.

You may not see a big jump in comprehension if the material you listen to is increasingly difficult, such as a series of podcasts.
1 person has voted this message useful



Arekkusu
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Canada
bit.ly/qc_10_lec
Joined 3455 days ago

3971 posts - 7745 votes 
Speaks: English, French*, GermanC1, Spanish, Japanese, Esperanto
Studies: Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Estonian

 
 Message 13 of 70
13 May 2011 at 4:06pm | IP Logged 
Excellent post!

What I get from your post is that language is alive. If you want to learn how it behaves, you need to go in the wild, observe it, and interact with it.

A lot of people make the mistake of over-intellectualizing their language studies, as if language was a school subject, a topic you studied like history or geography. On the contrary, languages are living beings and we should never lose sight of how they behave in the real world. If our goal is to be able to speak the language, then we need to expose ourselves to the language in its natural state by forcing ourselves to use it with natives, and by listening to and watching people use it (audio and video).

I too study in short bouts of 10, 20, 30 minutes. This way, I don’t get tired of it and I remain concentrated. But I think 2 other things happen: 1) it gives me time to ruminate what I’ve just been exposed to, so that most of my learning probably happens between sessions, and 2) it gives my brain time to soak it all up.

However, I would also like to add that, for reasons I can’t yet expose in such eloquent terms as you have, I believe instinctively that speaking is also a key element in comprehension. If I am exposed to a new phrase, howsoever that happened, and I make the effort to repeat it, bend it around, substitute parts of it with other words I know, I make it mine; and when I’m exposed to another similar phrase, whichever way it’s bent, my ability to understand it will increase. In real life, my ability to express myself will also increase and so will the variety of language and permutations I am exposed to in response.
11 persons have voted this message useful





budonoseito
Pro Member
United States
budobeyondtechnRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3879 days ago

261 posts - 343 votes 
Studies: French, Japanese
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 14 of 70
13 May 2011 at 5:49pm | IP Logged 
Arekkusu wrote:
Excellent post!

What I get from your post is that language is alive. If you want to learn how it
behaves, you need to go in the wild, observe it, and interact with it.

A lot of people make the mistake of over-intellectualizing their language studies, as
if language was a school subject, a topic you studied like history or geography. On the
contrary, languages are living beings and we should never lose sight of how they behave
in the real world. If our goal is to be able to speak the language, then we need to
expose ourselves to the language in its natural state by forcing ourselves to use it
with natives, and by listening to and watching people use it (audio and video).


Guilty. :(

I am Math/Computer geek. I realize what I normally do is not the best way to approach
languages. So, I try to make an effort to be more natural. Well, natural for other
people.
1 person has voted this message useful



Andrew C
Diglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
naturalarabic.com
Joined 3264 days ago

205 posts - 350 votes 
Speaks: English*, Arabic (Written)

 
 Message 15 of 70
13 May 2011 at 6:24pm | IP Logged 
I agree listening is essential right from the beginning. I just want to add:

As well as a transcript of the audio it is also useful and perhaps sometimes essential, to have a translation.

Why is listening so useful? In my opinion, because it gives an accurate, consistent input, which you will not get from reading alone. We are hard-wired to learn language through sound, not through sight.
1 person has voted this message useful



Arekkusu
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Canada
bit.ly/qc_10_lec
Joined 3455 days ago

3971 posts - 7745 votes 
Speaks: English, French*, GermanC1, Spanish, Japanese, Esperanto
Studies: Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Estonian

 
 Message 16 of 70
13 May 2011 at 6:27pm | IP Logged 
Andrew C wrote:
We are hard-wired to learn language through sound, not through sight.

Definitely agree, and wired to learn through speaking, not writing.


1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 70 messages over 9 pages: << Prev 13 4 5 6 7 8 9  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.3594 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2019 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.