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Turkish family of languages

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liddytime
Pentaglot
Senior Member
United States
mainlymagyar.wordpre
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Speaks: English*, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Galician
Studies: Hungarian, Vietnamese, Modern Hebrew, Norwegian, Persian, Arabic (Written)

 
 Message 41 of 88
09 November 2011 at 3:31pm | IP Logged 
Here is an interesting post on the subject:
languages/">http://robertlindsay.wordpress.com/2010/01/04/mu tual-intelligibility-among-the-turkic-
languages/


I became interested because I met a native Uyghur speaker the other day. I was curious how much Turkish she
could understand so I spoke some very basic Turkish sentences to her. She said she understood perfectly!
Amazing.
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!LH@N
Triglot
Senior Member
Germany
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Speaks: German, Turkish*, English
Studies: Serbo-Croatian, Spanish

 
 Message 43 of 88
12 November 2011 at 3:48pm | IP Logged 
it's basically the same language. Pronounciation is a little different (especially on Cyprus, they speak really weird!), but the rest is all the same.
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daristani
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Studies: Uzbek

 
 Message 44 of 88
12 November 2011 at 4:57pm | IP Logged 
On the Cypriot/Turkish connection, !ILHON is absolutely correct that it's essentially the same language, and the similarities have presumably become even greater since the Turkish invasion of 1974 and the resulting migration of Turks from Anatolia into Cyprus.

There are some dialectal differences in the spoken language, though, in the pronunciation as !ILHON notes and also in vocabulary and grammar. The English Wikipedia has some examples:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cypriot_Turkish

For a more detailed look, the following paper in Turkish by Nurettin Demir is quite interesting: http://turkoloji.cu.edu.tr/DILBILIM/nurettin_demir_kibris.pd f

My favorite grammatical difference is the use of "miş" as an independent adverb, as in the following example from Demir's paper:

Miş Ahmet okula gitmeyecek yarın = standard Turkish ‘[Güya / söylediğine göre] Ahmet yarın okula gitmeyecekmiş’.

A recent book, "Kıbrıs Konuşuyor" by Rıdvan Öztürk, goes into all this in much more detail.


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Kartof
Bilingual Triglot
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 Message 45 of 88
12 November 2011 at 9:32pm | IP Logged 
I know that the Turkish spoken by the Turks in Bulgaria is Ottoman Turkish and it has even picked up some
aspects of grammar from the Balkan Sprachbund, bringing it closer to other Balkan languages and farther away
from standard Turkish.
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!LH@N
Triglot
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Germany
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487 posts - 531 votes 
Speaks: German, Turkish*, English
Studies: Serbo-Croatian, Spanish

 
 Message 46 of 88
13 November 2011 at 3:11pm | IP Logged 
Ottoman Turkish was only spoken by the elite in the Ottoman Empire, so I highly doubt that the Turks in Bulgaria are speaking Ottoman Turkish.
Standard Turkish is the Turkish spoken in Istanbul, and as in every country only the educcated people speak it (to some degree, there are many who don't), the rest of the population staying with it's regional variants.
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Kartof
Bilingual Triglot
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Speaks: English*, Bulgarian*, Spanish
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 Message 47 of 88
13 November 2011 at 3:37pm | IP Logged 
Well the lower classes of Turks didn't speak modern Turkish during the Ottoman Empire; they spoke some lesser
variety of Ottoman Turkish. Therefore, the Turks in Bulgaria would much more likely be influenced by Ottoman
Turkish than modern standard Turkish. I'd imagine like how the French in Quebec speak a descendent of Middle
French and not modern French. I may be wrong though, it just seems more logical than it being "all the same".
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!LH@N
Triglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 5178 days ago

487 posts - 531 votes 
Speaks: German, Turkish*, English
Studies: Serbo-Croatian, Spanish

 
 Message 48 of 88
13 November 2011 at 3:42pm | IP Logged 
no, they didn't speak modern Turkish, but they didn't speak a variety of Ottoman Turkish either. Ottoman Turkish was kind of a "constructed" language, it borrowed heavily from Persian and Arabic vocabulary and grammatical structures.
Everybody but the elite in the Ottoman Empire spoke their regional variant of Turkish, which did not borrow as heavily from Persian and Arabic.
Modern Turkish of today is based on the language of the peasants rather than on Ottoman Turkish. So the relation comes from there. The Turkish of the Balkan Turks is as removed from Standard Turkish as any other regional variation is, and by far not as far removed from Standard Turkish than Ottoman Turkish was.


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