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Panglot and Panglotism: new type of polyg

 Language Learning Forum : Polyglots Post Reply
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futurianus
Senior Member
Korea, South
starlightonclou
Joined 3193 days ago

125 posts - 234 votes 
Speaks: Korean*

 
 Message 57 of 67
06 June 2012 at 1:09pm | IP Logged 


Instigated by the appearance of Mabou Loiseu to my attention and triggered by the thread on Benny Lewis, I have started my discussion on translingual methodologies and approaches to language acquisition.
Three dimensionality of translingualism brings certain cross-cultural and anthropological elements more sharply in focus.

I will be discussing about the precious gifts hidden within the phenomena of Wendy Vo and Mabou Loiseu(How to raise a kid polyglot? Version 2012) to unearth several important aspects of translingual learning and tie them up with the concepts of language acquisition as acquiring a set of new habits(Language as Habit) within immersion environment(What is an effective immersion method?).

Please follow the above threads to follow up on the discussion of translingualism and panglotism, as they are all interconnected subthemes.

from How to raise a kid polyglot? Version 2012 06 June 2012
Quote:

....
It is through dipping yourself in the waters of immersion multiple times, that you will gain and develop your 'animalistic sense and feeling' of what undergoing a genuine immersion experiences is like, and this sense will in turn lead and guide you in all your language learning experiences for the rest of your life.

Language learning can be such a stimulating and fun experience.
If you can get rid of wrong conditioning and habits which work against you, and should you be given enough time and quietness in life to pursue your language learning goals, you will have a feast of your life, even while others around you might be trudging along the thorny and dusty road in rags, hungry and thirsty, complaining and murmuring, kicking against themselves.


You may even want to walk the path of a panglotter.

While others might cringe at the thought of this, immediately imagining an unbearably painful and stressful torturous studying of so many languages, you will grin widely, your mouth becoming watery, feeling happy and grateful that our planet is offering such a rich variety of languages and cultures for you to experience, to eat and drink, to feast on, even worrying that all those tasty main dishes may eventually be emptied out.



---There is no human language that a human being cannot learn---
---Panglots must be baptized in many waters----



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Globe-trotter
Triglot
Newbie
Netherlands
Joined 2781 days ago

29 posts - 44 votes
Speaks: Dutch*, English, German
Studies: Thai

 
 Message 58 of 67
06 June 2012 at 2:30pm | IP Logged 
lichtrausch wrote:
Ari wrote:

A question: which languages are the world languages one would focus on? English,
Mandarin and Spanish seem to be the big three. Arabic surely comes next. And then?
French for its importance in Africa, I guess. If India ends up uniting around Hindi,
that could be a major one, as well.

I would personally include: English, Mandarin, Hindustani, Spanish, Portuguese, French,
Persian, Arabic, Malay, Russian, Swahili. I feel that for this kind of list geographic
spread and population size are the most important factors, and you can see that
reflected in my choices.


I'd also include German, the largest spoken language of the European Union, widely
spoken in Central and Eastern Europe. However, that would mean learning 12 completely
different languages, a task of a lifetime.
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futurianus
Senior Member
Korea, South
starlightonclou
Joined 3193 days ago

125 posts - 234 votes 
Speaks: Korean*

 
 Message 59 of 67
07 January 2013 at 1:08am | IP Logged 

Panglottic Identification with and Ownership of Foreign Languages--A

2013.01.07 Monday 07:30, Seoul, Korea
---There is no human language that a human being cannot learn---
---Panglots must be baptized in many waters----


Walking the path of a panglotter and trying to grow in different languages and cultures
has been quite a fascinating and illuminating experience and adventure for me thus far.

As I face a new year of 2013 and consider the task of foreign language acquisition for
this year, I am renewing my commitment to and reorienting my thoughts and attitude
towards it.

I remind myself that there is no human language that I, as a human being, cannot
acquire or grow myself in, if adequate opportunity and stimulus are given to me.
I also reconfirm my organic interconnection and unity with all the people living on our
planet, and thereby claim my identification with and ownership over all human languages
and cultures.

At the beginning of a new year, I am laying the foundation for growing in new languages
and cultures by carving out a space within my heart to receive them as 'my languages
and my cultures', even while acknowledging and respecting the unique sentiment for
identification with and ownership for those languages and cultures by the respective
people groups who were born into them.



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futurianus
Senior Member
Korea, South
starlightonclou
Joined 3193 days ago

125 posts - 234 votes 
Speaks: Korean*

 
 Message 60 of 67
04 October 2013 at 4:21pm | IP Logged 
The foundation of the possibility and growth of panglottism on the organicity of human species and languages


Due to the organicity of human species and language, all human languages can be presumed to be all linked together in one way or another. Even very isolated people groups must have come from some place and have link with other people groups.

When one acquires a native language, in fact, he already has the seed of a panglot, is a latent panglot.
He has already acquired some skills and knowledge of all other languages on the planet.

When one learns any language, one is also learning and growing in several other languages, regardless of whether one is conscious or not, whether one is making an effort to do so or not. When one learns Italian, for example, one has already learned a substantial percentage of French, Spanish, German, English, Russian, and other languages which share many identifiable commonalities. Even in relation with FreekFreek, Korokkoko and Abajohon aboriginal languages, one would be able to trace identifiable human language structure and characteristics.

Thus it can be represented that when one learns a language 1 to 85%, one is at the same time learning and growing in language 2 to 65%, language 3 to 51%, language 4 to 31%, language 5 to 15%, language 6 to 7%, language 7 to 2%, language 8 to 1%, language 9 to 0.01%,....language 1256 to 0.002%, etc.

Panglottism is by its very nature extraordinarily sensitive and attentive to the organic interrelationships and intermeshing among different languages and language families from the planetary and species's perspective, for its possibility and growth is founded upon organicity of human species and all human languages.

All human beings who have acquired a mother tongue have unwittingly acquired a measure of skill and knowledge in other languages, firstly of those which are related closely with his mother tongue, secondarily of those which are secondarily related and lastly of all other languages that exist on the planet, regardless of how many there might be, including all little variations within classified language groupings, whether they are in the thousands or tens of thousands.   Thus there is no true monoglot from panglottic perspective. Everyone is already an unconscious multilingual, a measure of polyglot and latent panglot.

All human languages can be described as being a gigantic conglomerate globe of network system in which each identifiable conglomerate blob is linked with several other blobs in complex three dimensional way, with different tiers of larger concentric centers.

Panglottism, as expounded here, identifies major and minor language groupings within those larger concentric centers within the globe, targets one major central language within a grouping and seeks to concentrate its energy and time on first gaining a workable level of proficiency in that language, and by deliberate choice deselect other languages within that grouping for the time being in order to effectively manage its time and energy resources to accomplish its panglottic objectives within the allotted time.

By concentrating its energy and resources on mastering important centric languages, it is aware that it is at the same time assimilating numerous related languages within that group, and also reaching out to the languages in other groups, at the area where they are meshed intragroupingly.

This way, it lays the foundation for acquiring a linguistic awareness and capacity to cover the majority of languages on the planet, primarily for the present age, with possible forage into identifiable and significant past languages, primarily in order to understand the culture and civilization of those language groups and secondarily to communicate with them.

Panglottism is an important attempt at becoming a global citizen, a planetarian, and an earthman at this particular juncture in human history, which attempt to learn the supralanguage of our species, the language of Adam.

The first panglottism must be subsumed into the higher center for human futurity, so that the first 'panglot' can open his mouth and communicate to Adam the whisper of the innumerable twinkling stars above.


....
....

The alien turned around his head, thinking someone had mentioned him....
....
....


Edited by futurianus on 04 October 2013 at 9:20pm

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futurianus
Senior Member
Korea, South
starlightonclou
Joined 3193 days ago

125 posts - 234 votes 
Speaks: Korean*

 
 Message 61 of 67
05 October 2013 at 7:34pm | IP Logged 
Notice: This is only a fictional conversation.



Conversation with ProfArguelles: On the construct of supralanguage


Today I was browsing through Lessons in Polyglottery section and came across a fascinating post by ProfArguelles in 2005.

Let me bring him here to discuss more on his post in relation to a more globalized foreign language learning and panglottism.

Futurianus: I was quite fascinated to find a post by you today just a while ago, a post from 2005 about how you began to see more of the unity among different languages within same family, especially in Germanic and Romance language families, and how you "can envision a day when I will feel more comfortable saying I know Western European than saying I know Germanic and Romance."

Your post has a direct bearing to my post of yesterday that deals with the organicity of all human languages and its relation to panglottism.
From Ardaschir
ProfArguelles wrote:
Message 2 of 29
February 17 2005 at 9:59pm | IP Logged
....
....
Well, what did I mean by what a language is and what it means to know a language? You are familiar with the concept of language families and the notion that languages are related to each other genetically and historically, are you not?

Take the Germanic family, to which English, German, Dutch, Afrikaans, Frisian, Yiddish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese all belong. All of these are traditionally regarded as different languages and they are. Your average monolingual Australian knows only the first one, and plopped down into a monolingual community of any of the others, he would be unable to communicate. However, he would soon come to understand many common words for homely items, and if he were to sit down and study any one of them, he would find many other common points of structural comparison as well, for all of these languages have a similar developmental history from a common point of origin. If he were to embark on the philological study of some of these languages, thereby coming to understand how, e.g., English evolved from Anglo-Saxon through Middle English into the modern language we are now using, and if he were also to take one of the living forms, say German, the next on the list, and learn it well, both in its living incarnation and its past forms, what do you suppose would happen if he were exposed to a third language, say Dutch, the third on the list I gave? Why, he would find that he understood quite a bit of it without ever even studying it, far more than either your average Joe or Hans could understand. Dutch, to the typical English or German speaker a related but different and distinct language, would appear to him as a penetrable dialect. The more knowledge and experience you have, the more this process continues.

If you thoroughly study eight out of ten members of a language family, you will probably find that you can understand the other two without even studying them. Indeed, while the speakers of these various languages perceive the other languages to be distinctly different, you will rather see and hear them as variations on a single theme. If you ve never conversed in a speech form or read a book in it, you certainly can t claim to know it the same way you can claim to know a language you have lived in for years and whose literature you have consumed, but if there is no doubt that you will be able to cope with it on your very first encounter, then you still know it, albeit in a different sense. Well, all of this is exactly what has happened to me. I honestly perceive the entire Germanic family as a single unit and I would feel more comfortable saying that I know Germanic than I would saying I know  English, German, Dutch Likewise, I would feel more comfortable saying I know Romance than I would saying that I know Latin, French, etc., etc. Until quite recently I certainly still perceived Germanic and Romance to be separate and distinct entities. However, I believe that with more experience and perspective, the similarities of these two related branches of the I-E family will outweigh their differences. As I age and consolidate my knowledge of various exotic tongues, I am coming to feel this way, and I can envision a day when I will feel more comfortable saying I know Western European than saying I know Germanic and Romance. And so on.



ProfArguelles: It is good to visit here. Looks like you have been grappling with all of the world's languages. I also have been pursuing a very globalized language learning throughout my professional life.
I notice that your place does not seem to have much interactions.

Futurianus: Yes, it seems that I have expounded here some perspectives which did go beyond the interest of regular language learners. Some who were more globally oriented showed some interest in the topic, but when the topic turned somewhat extreme and seemingly peculiar turn, they also do not seem to know how to handle it.
I am glad that I finally shared my thoughts on the topic here.
It has my own peculiar and unique perspectives and goals in it, but it also might manifest some features of language learning and globalized foreign language learning which could benefit wider community of language learners, as when you research into an extreme case you can often gain clearer insight and understanding into the nature, properties and possibilities of the same case in its normal condition.   

As I am always struggling with making more time to spend with languages, it is difficult for me to come here often to write more, without sacrificing my language time. Fortunately, they are having a long holiday season right now here in China and I am spending some time here after having received a peculiar impetus recently to post here again.

I hope you are now feeling "more comfortable saying I know Western European than saying I know Germanic and Romance." For the discussion at hand, it is important to develop certain new models or constructs for thinking about languages. One of which models would be that of looking at several languages as forming an identifiable superlanguage, supralanguage or translanguage, so to speak, a gestalt of Germanic, Romance, or Western European, being something more than the sum of aggregates.

ProfArguelles: Yes, it is something that I could begin to see more clearly through years of my training in comparative philology and language studies, especially European languages.

Futurianus: I am not professionally trained in comparative philology, linguistics and languages.
My perspective is coming more from planetary and species's perspective on human languages.
I respect anyone who does extremely well in their chosen field and I must say that you have really devoted yourself to master your trade. Your mastery of European languages is remarkably solid and comprehensive. I would think your postdoctoral research experience in Germany and Europe has been decisive in strengthening your foundation in this.

ProfArguelles: Yes, European language family has been my root and base and I have branched out to other families while I was in Korea.

Futurianus: I believe some of our times in Korea overlapped. We might have passed by each other there on the street, who knows, though I was based mainly in Seoul and have not gone down to Donghae area often, though I had been there a few times. It is interesting that you have chosen Korean as your first venture outside of European language group. I can imagine what kind of struggle you might have gone through.

ProfArguelles: Yes, I chose Korean and even went there, because I have finally decided to learn a language outside of European family, a language that would be most difficult to learn and thereby most challenging for me to learn. It was quite a difficult language for me and it took me many years to learn it. When I left Korea, I took a 'Korean' with me^^.

Futurianus: Yes, I read that. It is interesting that I, who would drag you back to this forum, am, of all the people, also a Korean...
I would guess it has given you quite a new perspective on European languages and its groupings. It is often only when we have a contrasting object that we can compare two objects well to see their distinctive properties and qualities in a sharper contrasting relief, see those things we could not see when we were wrapped up analyzing just one object in detail. One cannot see a system as a whole from inside. It is only when you step out of the system, that you can see the system as a whole, see whether its shape is round, triangular or rectangular.

ProfArguelles: Yes, having studied different languages from different language families during a decade of time when I was in Korea and also later in other language family regions has given me a greater ability to see different groupings in sharper detail, and helped me to have a better perspective on various European language families in their gestalt form.

Futurianus: I have been shaped and trained by several factors to see the human species as one organic entity and have been occupied for many years to observe the patterns of his growth on our planet and extrapolate the direction of that pattern into his futurity. I cannot get into details about it here now, but in relation to languages, I have been awakened to see language's important role in understanding our humanity as a whole and have developed an interest in acquiring various levels of capacity in various languages to understand and communicate with different people groups, and with what I sometimes refer to as the "Adam born on this side of the universe". My particular brand of panglottism has been born out of my desire to develop a capacity to understand and communicate more effectively with this Adam. I know it sounds somewhat esoteric and strange, but I hope that you will understand the model I have constructed, at least from the linguistic side as a viable nonmetaphysical functional linguistic construct.

ProfArguelles: Yes, from my philological background, I can see how such a construct and model can be built. I myself have built the model of thinking in terms of 'Germanic', 'Romance' and 'Western European' as a way of rethinking languages, what the languages are, from a more 'polytranslingual' perspective, as you have coined the term to describe polyglottism from a more globalistic perspective, though I do not use such construct often or explain its concept often, but have explained it once in the above quoted response to a perceptive question to a statement that I had made that "...because it is precisely when you do know many languages that the questions of what a language is and what it means to know a language become very blurry."

Futurianus: As someone nonprofessional in language, linguistics and other related fields, I had for a long time wanted to have an opportunity to interact with the experts in those fields.
I enjoyed interacting with you today and wish you well in your calling and endeavors.

ProfArguelles: I will think about your construct of the supralanguage of humanity, the language of Adam. I can see that it has made the same jump in imaginative categorization, a synthetic one that had for me an experiential significance, a jump which I could have made by having become very familiar with its wider landscape and all the details of the local places through many years of training in comparative philology and study of languages outside of European language families. Thus I can see a possibility and usefulness of such a construct. Well, it was a pleasure to appear in your panglottism post room and thanks for inviting me.

Futurianus: Thank you for coming.




Edited by futurianus on 06 October 2013 at 4:59am

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futurianus
Senior Member
Korea, South
starlightonclou
Joined 3193 days ago

125 posts - 234 votes 
Speaks: Korean*

 
 Message 62 of 67
06 October 2013 at 3:41am | IP Logged 
....

Edited by futurianus on 07 October 2013 at 11:08am

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lichtrausch
Triglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4144 days ago

525 posts - 1071 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Japanese
Studies: Korean, Mandarin

 
 Message 63 of 67
06 October 2013 at 3:46am | IP Logged 
futurianus wrote:

Notice: This is only a fictional conversation.

You should really put this part in bold at the start of these fictional posts...
2 persons have voted this message useful



futurianus
Senior Member
Korea, South
starlightonclou
Joined 3193 days ago

125 posts - 234 votes 
Speaks: Korean*

 
 Message 64 of 67
06 October 2013 at 4:28am | IP Logged 
lichtrausch wrote:
futurianus wrote:

Notice: This is only a fictional conversation.

You should really put this part in bold at the start of these fictional posts...

lichtrausch,
Thanks for timely pointing out my oversight.
I have corrected it to prevent a possible misunderstanding.
Good to hear from you again.

Edited by futurianus on 06 October 2013 at 4:51am



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