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TAC ’12-’15: Team *jäŋe / *ledús

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Chung
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Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 17 of 267
09 December 2011 at 12:22am | IP Logged 
hribecek wrote:
Kisfroccs wrote:
Chung wrote:
Zsófi, I'm amused that you like the etymological aspect when learning a language. At least I can now narrow down my choices about whom it was who voted for my preceding post in the thread ;-)


Ah ah, no Chung, it's not me who voted, but I could have ;) It's interesting enough what you post, and often I wish that I would unterstand Nothern Saami to follow correctly your posts. :)


The mystery voter was me. I also found it interesting and often vote for your interesting posts about Northern Saami too.


Then, mystery solved...

I should have tweaked the lyrics a bit more. A less grammatically erroneous motto using the full refrain would be:

Hej, élet, be gyöngy élet, ennél szebb sem lehet,
♪♫ Csak az csatlakozzon hozzánk, aki ilyet szeret.
♪♫ ~ "They who like (it) this way, just (let them) join us!"

The number of syllables is the same as before but the translation has an inverted order of the clauses and English's use of pronouns with gender shunts it to plural.

"...jöjjön a csapatnak" doesn't really sound right even though it was fairly easy to devise by using a csapatnak in place of original katonának. I wonder if it would make maxval's ears bleed if he were to hear "jöjjön a csapatnak".
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Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5789 days ago

4228 posts - 8257 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 18 of 267
11 December 2011 at 7:34am | IP Logged 
hribecek wrote:
I like 1, 3 or 4 the most as possible names and also like the motto suggestion.

I might give myself the added task of learning maybe 50ish words or phrases from everybody in our team's languages. So for me that would be 50 words or phrases from Croatian, Finnish and Northern Saami (and maybe more). It would be good for team spirit! :))


That sounds good. Each person could do such a thing in at least one language that he/she isn't actively studying but is being studied by someone else in the team. I could do it for Russian because of Volte, but I'm thinking seriously about fulfilling the task with at least one of Belorussian, Livonian or Mari using the material that I've found online for those languages.
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hribecek
Triglot
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Czech Republic
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 Message 19 of 267
11 December 2011 at 3:27pm | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:
hribecek wrote:
I like 1, 3 or 4 the most as possible names and also like the motto suggestion.

I might give myself the added task of learning maybe 50ish words or phrases from everybody in our team's languages. So for me that would be 50 words or phrases from Croatian, Finnish and Northern Saami (and maybe more). It would be good for team spirit! :))


That sounds good. Each person could do such a thing in at least one language that he/she isn't actively studying but is being studied by someone else in the team. I could do it for Russian because of Volte, but I'm thinking seriously about fulfilling the task with at least one of Belorussian, Livonian or Mari using the material that I've found online for those languages.

I can already feel the wanderlust kicking in! I think I'll start with Northern Saami and will probably learn most of it from your posts and then I'll ask you about some other phrases that I'd like to use here sometimes like - good luck, hello everybody, congratulations etc.

I'm also now planning to maybe go to Croatia, Bosnia and Montenegro on holiday next year so I'll leave Croatian until nearer the time.
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Chung
Diglot
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Joined 5789 days ago

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 Message 20 of 267
11 December 2011 at 5:55pm | IP Logged 
hribecek wrote:
Chung wrote:
hribecek wrote:
I like 1, 3 or 4 the most as possible names and also like the motto suggestion.

I might give myself the added task of learning maybe 50ish words or phrases from everybody in our team's languages. So for me that would be 50 words or phrases from Croatian, Finnish and Northern Saami (and maybe more). It would be good for team spirit! :))


That sounds good. Each person could do such a thing in at least one language that he/she isn't actively studying but is being studied by someone else in the team. I could do it for Russian because of Volte, but I'm thinking seriously about fulfilling the task with at least one of Belorussian, Livonian or Mari using the material that I've found online for those languages.

I can already feel the wanderlust kicking in! I think I'll start with Northern Saami and will probably learn most of it from your posts and then I'll ask you about some other phrases that I'd like to use here sometimes like - good luck, hello everybody, congratulations etc.

I'm also now planning to maybe go to Croatia, Bosnia and Montenegro on holiday next year so I'll leave Croatian until nearer the time.


For Northern Saami I suggest that you use my posts as reference material to supplement whichever course you will use (for reasons of copyright, I'm not able to translate everything from Davvin and have restricted myself to giving a summary of grammar and vocabulary taught in every chapter that I've completed so far. It would be quite hard to learn much Northern Saami using my summaries alone as they lack dialogues, audio, exercises and more detailed lists of vocabulary that show the inflectional stems). In addition, I think that anyone using my notes should reorganize them. As they are now, they match the order as encountered in Davvin but when used as a reference they would be disjointed. For example notes about the present tense are spread out among a few chapters but do not follow consecutively.

If you don't want to spend a penny, I suggest Gulahalan 1 as the primary course and take advantage of whatever suitable supplementary online material that you can find in the Saamic / Lappish profile. Anyway feel free to ask me if anything else comes up. I'll try to help.
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hribecek
Triglot
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Czech Republic
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 Message 21 of 267
11 December 2011 at 6:24pm | IP Logged 
Chung wrote:


For Northern Saami I suggest that you use my posts as reference material to supplement whichever course you will use (for reasons of copyright, I'm not able to translate everything from Davvin and have restricted myself to giving a summary of grammar and vocabulary taught in every chapter that I've completed so far. It would be quite hard to learn much Northern Saami using my summaries alone as they lack dialogues, audio, exercises and more detailed lists of vocabulary that show the inflectional stems). In addition, I think that anyone using my notes should reorganize them. As they are now, they match the order as encountered in Davvin but when used as a reference they would be disjointed. For example notes about the present tense are spread out among a few chapters but do not follow consecutively.

If you don't want to spend a penny, I suggest Gulahalan 1 as the primary course and take advantage of whatever suitable supplementary online material that you can find in the Saamic / Lappish profile. Anyway feel free to ask me if anything else comes up. I'll try to help.

Thanks for the tips.

I'm only intending to learn 50-100 words and phrases plus some basic grammar and the pronunciation, so expect you'll be fine as a resource for those modest goals. I will look at the free stuff you recommended too.

I've got too much on with Czech and Hungarian to really dedicate myself to a new language completely.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5789 days ago

4228 posts - 8257 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 22 of 267
12 December 2011 at 3:11am | IP Logged 
Unfortunately, I doubt that I'll be your primary source for learning pronunciation. However Gulahalan 1, Boađe mu mielde! or Bures boahtin should help you with that regardless of whether you want to go beyond the lowest survival level.

It's too bad that there's nothing like DLIFLC's survival guides or the Peace Corps' audio-visual primers for Northern Saami.
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cathrynm
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junglevision.co
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 Message 23 of 267
12 December 2011 at 6:05am | IP Logged 
Interesting, I know very little about Sami. It has some words that sound totally alien to Finnish like that Cakcat, but then mon/mu = minä I guess? Ollu?   Bits and pieces have a Finnish sound to it.   I don't think I've heard this language before, because in my mind, I always imaginined it to be something like Estonian, close to Finnish but with sound shifts and additional vocabulary.
1 person has voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5789 days ago

4228 posts - 8257 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 24 of 267
12 December 2011 at 6:47am | IP Logged 
That's funny because when I heard it for the first time when stumbling upon The Cuckoo I thought initially that Ánne Risten Juuso was speaking a strange Estonian dialect. I had then just finished studying some Estonian and was eager to see if I could pick up anything recognizable in her dialogue. I was pretty sure that she wasn't speaking Finnish because her lines weren't forming a coherent dialogue with the Finnish soldier's lines. It took me a few minutes of watching before concluding that she had to be speaking some Saamic language (very likely Northern Saami) since nothing coming from her matched what I knew from Estonian, and her dress reminded me of what I had seen in some descriptions about the Saami.

Yes, there's a link between minä ~ minun and mun (mon) ~ mu but ollu doesn't seem to have any firm relation with anything in the other Uralic languages apart from a possible link to the Nenets word ŋūĺīʔ "very", "total".

The entry for ollu at the online Uralic Etymological Database at the Tower of Babel suggests possible links to words in other Eurasiatic languages (e.g. Czech velký "big"; Tamil வலிமை "strength" (read "valimai"); Turkish ulu "great") but this is quite shaky.


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