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FabricioCarraro - TAC’15 Pushkin, Rätsel

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Isabliss_27
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Speaks: Portuguese*, English
Studies: German, Russian, Latin, French

 
 Message 17 of 439
17 January 2012 at 3:18pm | IP Logged 
Michel Thomas is very useful, indeed. I assimilate much more what I learn from MT than other courses, at least with Russian. I'm still in the beginning of the German course.


PS: My sister started the Dutch course after hearing me for weeks telling her how MT was amazing. And guess what, she loved!    


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Solfrid Cristin
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 Message 18 of 439
17 January 2012 at 9:58pm | IP Logged 
fabriciocarraro wrote:

You convinced me that Norwegian is probably the best option between the Scandinavian languages, but I'm worried about the fact that the population of Sweden is twice the one from Norway, and I'd be able to speak with more people.


We are almost 5 miilion. And we talk a lot :-). Besides learning Norwegian is a great insurance in case you ever would like to work in another country. There is almost always a demand for skilled people, and obviously you have a much better chance than everyone else if you speak the language. Lots of Swedes come to Norway to find work.

Edited by Solfrid Cristin on 17 January 2012 at 9:59pm

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fabriciocarraro
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russoparabrasileirosRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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Speaks: Portuguese*, EnglishB2, Italian, Spanish, Russian, French
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 Message 19 of 439
18 January 2012 at 9:50pm | IP Logged 
@s0fist Thanks for the examples!

@Isabliss_27 Bom saber que o MT Russian é bom! Tava pensando em comprar, pois eu gostei MUITO do MT Dutch, mas meu russo é mais avançado que meu holandês, então talvez eu pegaria só o Advanced mesmo.

@Solfrid Cristin Even Swedes are searching jobs in Norway? Wow! I thought it would be the other way around! At least, we get a lot more here from Sweden than from Norway, and I just thought Swedish could be more important. Now I'm not that sure at all =P
I was looking over some videos (with a blonde girl, maybe you know them) teaching Norwegian on Youtube, and they're very nice for beginners, specially in the aspect of pronounciation, which seemed quite hard to me, at least for starters.
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Isabliss_27
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 Message 20 of 439
19 January 2012 at 6:00am | IP Logged 
Se quiser uma "amostra" do Advanced (ou ele todo, haha), sei onde pode baixá-lo na net. Já que vc pretende comprar, é uma boa pra verificar se vc gosta mesmo. :D

Ah, e eu já vi vários desses vídeos da menina que ensina norueguês quando eu tava aprendendo. Muito legal mesmo. Achava uma onda quando ela e amiga começavam a falar na velocidade da luz para os meus ouvidos de iniciante. xD
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fabriciocarraro
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russoparabrasileirosRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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Speaks: Portuguese*, EnglishB2, Italian, Spanish, Russian, French
Studies: Dutch, German, Japanese

 
 Message 21 of 439
21 January 2012 at 5:31pm | IP Logged 
More DUTCH news!

I've finished 2 days ago my MT Dutch Foundations, and I can say for sure that I feel the improvement! It was like picking up all the grammar that I'd learned in books, putting it all together in audio and using it extensively! The teacher is great too! I most certainly recommend it! Now I'll try to find the Advanced course.

Also, I wrote a letter (actually an e-mail) in Dutch to a friend of mine, and he said I made only 3 mistakes! Yay for me =) I didn't write about anything too difficult, but anyway, it's an accomplishment!

My only doubt (if anyone knows Dutch here) is when should I use the past simple or the present perfect. In MT, they only use the past simple, but as far as I know, the present perfect is more widely used. For example "Ik schreef een brief" or "Ik heb een brief geschreven". Can anyone explain me the difference and when should I use each of them?

Thanks guys!

Edited by fabriciocarraro on 21 January 2012 at 11:24pm

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tarvos
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 Message 22 of 439
23 January 2012 at 1:26am | IP Logged 
The past tense is used to describe certain actions that happened in the past. For example - "Ik schreef een brief" literally means that at one time in the past, you wrote a letter. You are probably using it to describe a past situation or an action you did regularly in the past.

"Ik heb een brief geschreven" means you wrote a letter in general. It's a finished, complete action. You completed writing a letter. You're now probably eating or whatever.

It's a little confusing, I agree, because English switches around the use of these tenses. Present perfect in English usually indicates you're still doing something (or could be). "I have written a letter" means that you could still write another letter in future. "I wrote a letter" surely means that it's done, you will never write that letter again.

Indeed, the present perfect is used ridiculously often. We use the past tense especially when describing situations that occurred in the past, such as when you are telling a story.

I'll give you an example: you are a train traveler and you commuted regularly to see your significant other (you live together now).

If you say "ik reisde met de trein om mijn vriendin te zien" this is clearly describing that you used to always take the train to see her. It states nothing about whether you still do this, though.

If you say "Ik heb met de trein gereisd om mijn vriendin te zien" it'd connotate that you once travelled with the train to see your girlfriend, or you used to do so regularly, but you don't anymore. It was a thing you used to do, but you completed it. This implies you certainly don't anymore.

The Dutch really love their present perfect because we use it to express the same things English uses the past simple for.

The first sentence would translate into English as "I used to take the train to see my girlfriend" (you're describing a history of taking it".

The second was "I took the train to see my girlfriend". Same thing. You used to take a train, it was a one off action, you probably don't anymore.

The problem is, if you want to express an action that happened in the past and is still ongoing (f.e. I have taken the train to...), which is something English uses the present perfect tense for, is that that connotation is not readily expressed by a Dutch tense because we have much less verb tenses than English does.

Dutch people would probably work around it by saying "Ik reisde met de trein om mijn vriendin te zien en doe dat nu nog steeds" or more simply they'd just state "Ik reis met de trein om mijn vriendin te zien" implying they do it regularly.

In short, if in doubt, the present perfect is probably what you should go for. Our past simple tense is really much more in the way of an "imperfect" in the way that it describes the past than it is comparable to the English past simple tense.



Edited by tarvos on 23 January 2012 at 1:35am

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ReneeMona
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 Message 23 of 439
23 January 2012 at 1:54am | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
If you say "ik reisde met de trein om mijn vriendin te zien" this is
clearly describing that you used to always take the train to see her. It states nothing
about whether you still do this, though.

If you say "Ik heb met de trein gereisd om mijn vriendin te zien" it'd connotate that
you once travelled with the train to see your girlfriend, or you used to do so
regularly, but you don't anymore. It was a thing you used to do, but you completed it.
This implies you certainly don't anymore.


If someone said the first sentence to me, I would gather that they used to do this
regularly but don't anymore. If I said it myself, I would probably add "altijd" after
"reisde" to clarify my meaning. If someone said the second sentence to me, I would
think they took the train very recently and are referring to this one time of
travelling by train. To me, it doesn't say anything at all about whether they do it
regularly or intend to do it again, it simply conveys that they did it once in the
recent past and it still relates to the present. For instance, I would expect someone
to say this on the very day they took the train to see their girlfriend, for instance
to explain to someone why they aren't home.

I'm pretty sure the difference between the use of the simple past and past perfect has
something to do with how the action relates to the present, but I can't think of a rule
or an explanation except that sometimes a certain tense just sounds wrong in the given
context, which is of course of no use at all. Perhaps a site like onzetaal.nl could
give you a clearer explanation.
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tarvos
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 Message 24 of 439
23 January 2012 at 1:58am | IP Logged 
Exactly, there's a time lapse - perfect tense is a recent event.

Past simple is much further back in the past. Of course you would specify with "altijd" (but you would add that word as always if you translated into English).

Besides that, altijd would still clarify that you do not anymore. The altijd only means it was a really regular action. It still conveys the same "doesn't occur anymore" sense. But Dutch doesn't really have a good verb tense for describing the same things you could with present perfect continuous in English, for example.

Edited by tarvos on 23 January 2012 at 2:02am



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