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Georgian Notes, Doubts and Tips TAC 2013

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Expugnator
Hexaglot
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 Message 89 of 758
29 February 2012 at 10:25pm | IP Logged 
book2, about hotel booking. More questions than usual just because I feel more confident about this topic. As they say, you can't have a doubt when you actually don't know anything at all.

ერთადგილიანი ოთახი მჭირდება.     I need a single room.
What does -გილიანი stand for? I don't get how this word was composed to stand for single-room.

ოთახი მინდა შხაპით.     I would like a room with a shower.
Is it also ok to say "ჩემი ოთახი მინდა შხაპით"? What about "ჩემი ოთახი უნდა შხაპით"? I just wanted to be more specific, and say "I need my room to have a shower", how would that be?

კარგით, ავიღებ ამ ოთახს.     Fine, I'll take the room.
Is that expression კარგით (good in the instrumental) really used in this context?

===
Aronson's still on lesson 03

- What is the difference between saying შინ and სახლში? Also, is შინ more like an adverb than a noun?

- I've come across the word გუშინდელი as in yesterday's exercise. Which type of word is it and how exactly is it formed? Are there similar words? For "tomorrow" it seems to be ხვალინდელი.
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TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
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 Message 90 of 758
29 February 2012 at 11:03pm | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:
ერთადგილიანი ოთახი მჭირდება.     I need a single room.
What does -გილიანი stand for? I don't get how this word was composed to stand for
single-room.


The word is made up of ერთ for "one", ადგილ for "place", and იანი, the adjective
ending. I think maybe you were thinking it was ერთად, right?

Expugnator wrote:
ოთახი მინდა შხაპით.     I would like a room with a shower.
Is it also ok to say "ჩემი ოთახი მინდა შხაპით"? What about "ჩემი ოთახი უნდა შხაპით"?
I just wanted to be more specific, and say "I need my room to have a shower", how would
that be?


Although we need our მასწავლებელი Murdoc to confirm, I don't think your examples
would work. For "I need my room to have a shower", I would suggest საჭიროა რომ ჩემს
ოთახს შხაპი აქვს.

Expugnator wrote:
კარგით, ავიღებ ამ ოთახს.     Fine, I'll take the room.
Is that expression კარგით (good in the instrumental) really used in this context?


კარგით is the polite form of კარგი, just like გამარჯობათ and გამარჯობა, although
some Georgians say these forms are artificial and not strictly grammatical.

Expugnator wrote:
What is the difference between saying შინ and სახლში? Also, is შინ
more like an adverb than a noun?


I think it's just a difference in meaning. The former means "at/to home" and the
latter means "in/to the house".

Expugnator wrote:
I've come across the word გუშინდელი as in yesterday's exercise.
Which type of word is it and how exactly is it formed? Are there similar words? For
"tomorrow" it seems to be ხვალინდელი.


And "today's" is დღევანდელი.
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Murdoc
Triglot
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 Message 91 of 758
01 March 2012 at 7:12pm | IP Logged 
Quote:
"ჩემი ოთახი მინდა შხაპით"


The sentence itself is correct and sounds ok but the meaning can vary depending where you put stress. So unless you put stress on "შხაპით", reading naturally it sounds more like: "I want to have my own room with shower.", putting the stress on "ჩემი ოთახი".

Quote:
"ჩემი ოთახი უნდა შხაპით"


This sentence means: (He/She) wants my room with shower.

Quote:
"I need my room to have a shower"


This would be: ჩემს ოთახს უნდა ჰქონდეს შხაპი or ოთახი მჭირდება შხაპით.
or as Tixhiidon said:

Quote:
საჭიროა რომ ჩემს ოთახს შხაპი აქვს.


but: საჭიროა რომ ჩემს ოთახს შხაპი ჰქონდეს.

I don't why but that tense wouldn't work here in Georgian unlike English.

...

შინ is only used in literary language and formal speech.


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Expugnator
Hexaglot
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Brazil
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3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 92 of 758
01 March 2012 at 10:15pm | IP Logged 
book2, still on hotels.

შხაპი არ მუშაობს.     The shower isn't working.
It it an accurate translation? Simple like that?

ტელევიზორი გაფუჭებულია.    &n bsp;The TV isn't working.
Is this formed from a 2nd class verb? How is it formed? Would "to damage" be გაფუჭება?

ეს ჩემთვის ძალიან ძვირია.     That's too expensive.
"ჩემთვის" is "for me", right? Is it common to use ჩემთვის instead of constructions such as "I think that..." Does it mean "in my opinion" or "according to my capacity to afford it"?

At Aronson's I'm still doing the translation exercises from lesson 03. I'm seriously considering using a well-known Russian textbook, at least the dialogues.
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TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
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 Message 93 of 758
01 March 2012 at 10:58pm | IP Logged 
Despite getting almost everything I told you yesterday wrong (!), I'll try to help
again today.

გაფუჭებული is a perfect participle meaning "is broken". There are many many
irregularities in how these are formed, but in this case (Class I verbs with ებ) it's
quite straightforward.

The verb is გააფუჭებს (to break). Remove the second ა, i.e. the theme vowel, and add
ული to the end. That's all there is to it.

So for example from გააწითლებს (to make something red) you get გაწითლებული (has
turned red) and from ააშენებს (to build) you get აშენებული (is built).

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Murdoc
Triglot
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Georgia
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Speaks: Georgian*, English, Russian

 
 Message 94 of 758
02 March 2012 at 9:32pm | IP Logged 
Tixhiidon,
All you got wrong was one sentence :)

Expugnator,

Quote:
შხაპი არ მუშაობს. The shower isn't working.


simple as that.

Quote:
Is it common to use ჩემთვის instead of constructions such as "I think that..." Does it mean "in my opinion" or "according to my capacity to afford it"?


Here it means "according to my capacity to afford it" or simply "too expensive for me".
ჩემთვის is not used for constructions such as "I think that..."
"მე ვფიქრობ რომ" and more commonly "ჩემი აზრით" are used for that.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 95 of 758
02 March 2012 at 10:08pm | IP Logged 
book2 - Restaurant

I'm starting to like those lessons even more. Vocabulary has proved to be very helpful:

ერთი ლუდი, თუ შეიძლება. I'd like a beer. (one beer, please).
Any clue about the ethimology for "ლუდი"?

რძიან ყავას დავლევდი.     I'd like a coffee with milk.
I don't get the grammar of the sentence. Is დავლევდი imperfect? I expected to find the word for 'milk' at the instrumental, though it is adjectivized as რძიან(ი).

Georgian: a Reading Grammar

Struggling with the clumsy translations. I've given up on any attemps and am just having a brief look at the English translation. Then I compare it with the Georgian text and write down the Georgian.

One interesting fact I attested is that even between quotations names and titles still get declined, like "მზიან ღამეს" which is a direct object.

ავტორი means author and მწერილი means writer, right? They were used interchangeably somehow in the exercises (#33 and #34).

'Repeat' is გამეორება, with the word "two" in its root. Is there a different verb when you repeat something for the 3rd, 4th time? Or do you just say "repeat for the Xth time" even though the verb 'repeat' inherently carries the word "two" for its meaning?

AND...Lesson Three is over. I did learn a little, I just didn't bother learning passive constructions in depth this time. Hope some serious, saintereso study is waiting for me in Lesson 04!
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zecchino1991
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Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 96 of 758
02 March 2012 at 10:59pm | IP Logged 
When you use the imperfect endings with the future form of the verb, that makes the conditional. :)


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