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Georgian Notes, Doubts and Tips TAC 2013

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Murdoc
Triglot
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Georgia
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Speaks: Georgian*, English, Russian

 
 Message 193 of 758
26 April 2012 at 3:45pm | IP Logged 
Quote:
"I don't feel like studying?", "We don't feel like going to the gym?"


I think the closest you can get that feeling expressed in Georgian is:

"სწავლა მეზარება", "სავარჯიშოდ წასვლა გვეზარება".

You're right, "ჩვენ არ გვაქვს სურვილი" is literally "we don't have the desire" and sounds a bit formal.

Quote:
დღეს მოწყენილი ვარ. I am bored.
(Is it correct? I don't want to say I'm sad because I'm not =P)


Yeah it's kinda correct. Although, you have the right feeling, "მოწყენილი" can also have little element of sadness with it. It might be better to say "მოვიწყინე" – "I got bored". Otherwise if you're bored of doing something specific then you would say "მომბეზრდა...".

Quote:
How would I say "I'm thirsty"? 'I'm hungry' is მშია?


მწყურია
მშია

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Expugnator
Hexaglot
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Brazil
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Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 194 of 758
27 April 2012 at 9:37pm | IP Logged 
I'm really enjoying Lehrbuch der Georgischen Sprache. I hadn't had any great troubles so far with understanding and figuring out grammar from the dialogues.

I did Lesson 02's dialogue yesterday, but I'm still stuck at the exercises. They are of the "sentence forming" type - you get the subject, the object, the verb and you have to form the sentence obeying to Georgian patterns. For me it's just a declensions' exercises. It would be better if you were given the sentence in German to translate into Georgian.

Only the last set of exercises in each lesson is about text interpreting, so, this one is more useful, you have to reread the dialogue and search for the answer of who did what. So far pretty obvious to figure out, but the point is writing Georgian down, even though what you actually do is replace the question word with another noun and write the rest of the sentence likewise. Still, translation exercises would be better. I don't understand why they're gone from modern textbooks. The more you can contextualize your target and source languages, the more confident you are about speaking.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
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Brazil
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Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 195 of 758
27 April 2012 at 10:09pm | IP Logged 
Ok, I've realized the exercises are necessary. Especially when more advanced grammar features are presented, they'll be the only way for me to internalize those new structures.

Schedule will be like this:

book 2 - dialogue from Lehrbuch
exercises from Lehrbuch - book2

So, I should hurry up with exercises. Like I said I don't have the answer key, so, for sentences I'm really in doubt whether they are here, I'll just post them here, out of context. No need to write down exercises other than რვეულში...(or რვეულზე?)

Is it მე ვწერ სავარჯიშოს რვეულში or მე ვწერ სავარჯიშოს რვეულზე ?
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Hexaglot
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Brazil
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Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 196 of 758
27 April 2012 at 10:58pm | IP Logged 
book2

კაცს ქუდი ახურავს. The man is wearing a hat.
Why is კაცს in acc and ქუდი in nominative? Which type of verb is ახურავს?
It behaves like მაქვს, now that I looked more carefully.

ფეხებიც ძლიერია.
The legs are also athletic.

Isn't there a separate word for foot and leg? Both are ფეხი?

კაცი თოვლისგან არის გაკეთებული. The man is made of snow.
Notice the -გან from and გაკეთებული 'to be made of' which I assume is a 2nd class verb.
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zecchino1991
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United States
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Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 197 of 758
28 April 2012 at 12:05am | IP Logged 
Wouldn't gaketebuli be an adjective?
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Hexaglot
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Brazil
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Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 198 of 758
28 April 2012 at 12:19am | IP Logged 
Yeah with -ული ending, you're right. Still, it is formed from the same root.

I'm relieved that I could finish Lesson 03 also with the exercises (even though it happened just because I have to stay at work longer waiting for a colleague to finish his work so I can start mine). So far I'm almost only reviewing, though the explanations in the Lehrbuch are quite complete and, in spite of that, not boring at all. I won't push myself to always finish both dialogue and exercise, because it's not likely to happen everyday, but I'm satisfied with the way the book is organized.
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Murdoc
Triglot
Senior Member
Georgia
Joined 3886 days ago

113 posts - 208 votes 
Speaks: Georgian*, English, Russian

 
 Message 199 of 758
28 April 2012 at 3:32am | IP Logged 
Quote:
მე ვწერ სავარჯიშოს რვეულში


This one's right.

Quote:
Isn't there a separate word for foot and leg? Both are ფეხი?


Leg - ფეხი
Foot - ტერფი

However ფეხი can be used for any part of lower limb including foot. If you'd really want to specify then you would use ტერფი for foot. ტერფი is also more of an anatomical term.
Also to note: Football - ფეხბურთი
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3798 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 200 of 758
30 April 2012 at 2:32pm | IP Logged 
Got hold of Georgian: A Structural Reference Grammar by Hewitt (thorough work), La Langue Géorgienne (a 1931 book in French, more like a linguistical/philological description) and the 3 volumes dictionary by Kita Tschenkeli!

If it were new year's eve, my resolution would be:

"I will never complain about shortage of books for learning Georgian again
I will never complain about shortage of books for learning Georgian again
I will never complain about shortage of books for learning Georgian again"


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