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Georgian Notes, Doubts and Tips TAC 2013

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TixhiiDon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 4099 days ago

772 posts - 1473 votes 
Speaks: English*, Japanese, German, Russian
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 289 of 758
14 June 2012 at 6:19am | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:
If უფლება არ ჰქონდა means "did not have the right to", how would
"Had the right NOT to" be?


უფლება ჰქონდა ნაყინი არ ეჭამა, I guess.

Expugnator wrote:
I wasn't expecting a verbal noun to end in -ი (თამაში) hence my
doubt. I see that there are tricky differences as for when you use the verbal noun and
the subjunctive tenses.


Yeah, I suppose you could call თამაში an irregular verbal noun, although since there
are so many irregularities I don't think people bother making the distinction between
regular and irregular! By the way, ლაპარაკი, from ლაპარაკობს (which is also a Class
3 verb) is similar. On the other hand მუშაობს ("to work") gives the expected
მუშაობა... Best memorizing them one by one, I suppose.

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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
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3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 290 of 758
14 June 2012 at 11:53pm | IP Logged 
Now that you mentioned it, I should have remembered ლაპარაკი as well.

I think I got it with the უფლება ჰქონდა construction.

One more long text about the history of Georgia, this one was specially tiresome because Google Translator keeps crashing when I use anything but Chrome. In order to type some letters that are inserted through an uppercase variant (W, J, Z, R) you have to press the Shift key and somehow Google interprets you want to switch keyboards too, I believe it happens when you press Space right after but still haven't figured it out. All in all, it gets slow after some 50 attempts. And I don't have Chrome at work. Still, 5 lessons to go!
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 291 of 758
15 June 2012 at 5:45pm | IP Logged 
Today I inverted the order and started with Georgian. I managed to read the long text at the 29th lesson and now there are 4 left (1 text and 3 series of dialogues). I must say I feel like skipping them, especially if I realize I won't be able to finish the book by next week. Even so, I think it will still pay off. It's quite slow to translate word by word at Google and sometimes have to translate the German text too (which is not always accurate due to German word order), but all in all I got used to some aorist forms, learned to recognize some pluperfects (these ones are seldom recognize by the translator itself) and learned a bit of syntax. I hope this will encourage me to read other texts, because the ones at Lehrbuch seems quite natural language, they don't seem to be prepared for a textbook. They cover a difficult subject which is History: I've come across words unknown even in English. Therefore, I believe I'll be able to tackle other texts now.

What I need is a textbook with audio to follow, but I can't think of any, at least not with dialogues. Both Aronson's and Kiziria's consist of sentences read out loud, and that has already been done with book2. Now I need to follow real conversation. I think the Georgian Newspaper Reader also has audio, that's something but I miss dialogues. It will take a while till I can actually benefit from simply watching the TV.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 292 of 758
15 June 2012 at 6:02pm | IP Logged 
Posting here just so I don't lose track of it again:

Audio for Aronson's, Tschenkéli's and Chanishvili, Tsuleiskiri's:

Georgian Archive
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 293 of 758
18 June 2012 at 6:30pm | IP Logged 
CNN is broadcasting eye on: Georgia. I watched an episode on Saturday and it was interesting to hear a bit about Batumi and the planned city they want to build near there. I couldn't give the Georgian a try when people spoke because of the dubbing which was much louder.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 294 of 758
18 June 2012 at 9:53pm | IP Logged 
book2

What's the most natural way to ask "Are you sure?" in Georgian? book2 brings "ნამდვილად?" (Really?), but "Really?" is მართლა?, and they're not exactly the same thing.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 295 of 758
19 June 2012 at 3:42am | IP Logged 
It took me a long while but I finished the last text at Lehrbuch der Georgische Sprachen. Now three more (long) lessons with dialogues and lectures from professors, and I'm done. I'm sure for the later lessons the lack of better knowledge of German did matter, but I don't regret having gone through it. Now I feel more prepared to try other resources.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 296 of 758
20 June 2012 at 12:19am | IP Logged 
Due to power outage, I lost control of the schedule and couldn't finish most of the activities proposed for today. I decided to keep book2, though, because it is shorter and will allow me to complete the book soon.

ვბრაზობ, რომ ასე გვიან მოდიხარ. I'm angry that you come so late.
Neither of the sentences sound natural to me. Is it common to use ვბრაზობ, რომ?

ვშიშობ, რომ ფული თან არ მაქვს. I'm afraid I have no more money.
Why is თან not attached, what's the difference in meaning? Also, shouldn't it be აღარ (any longer) instead of არ?



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