Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Georgian Notes, Doubts and Tips TAC 2013

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
758 messages over 95 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 52 ... 94 95 Next >>
shawns
Diglot
Newbie
United States
Joined 3929 days ago

20 posts - 24 votes
Speaks: English*, Japanese
Studies: Georgian

 
 Message 409 of 758
05 September 2012 at 4:15am | IP Logged 
Could you post the links for the library sites? I'd like to see a parallel text of Jules Verne in Georgian!
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 410 of 758
05 September 2012 at 2:51pm | IP Logged 
Hey shawns, I got the Jules Verne's book from Buki.ge .
It's not parallel, I just mean that you can do that by downloading the English version and opening both files sinmultaneously in split windows.

(Those books have expired copyright).
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 411 of 758
06 September 2012 at 7:17pm | IP Logged 
Lesson 19 is over! Some 10 pages to go at Nikolaishvili's book as well. Next week I'll put an end to those two books, if everything goes smoothly.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 412 of 758
10 September 2012 at 9:22pm | IP Logged 
I've just finished two long texts from Nikolaishvili's book that didn't have accompanying audio. One was about Borjomi mineral water, the other about the construction of an oil pipeline (how boring). At least now I know there's only one text of one page left, then Newspaper Reader!! Wednesday is the day!

I'm not sure I'll have energy to keep up with Hewitt's dialogues today. I'm even going to interpolate Norwegian lesson right now, or else I won't be finished with Georgian during worktime and Norwegian will be left behind unnecessarily.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 413 of 758
11 September 2012 at 9:23pm | IP Logged 
I'm done!! Nikolaishvili's book is over!

I highly recommend this book as a solid ground for Georgian, after you finish Kiziria's and before you dabble in Aronson's. Since I don't know Russian, I can speak only for the dialogues, which are very adequate and do help you learn the grammar aspects gradually while you learn useful, daily vocabulary. Grammar also seems to be explained quite well. There are translations for each dialogue, so you always know where to resort in order to figure out a clumsy word order. Something so simple but so efficient, that improves your learning speed, unlike Hewitt's book that lacks this feature and slows you down so much. Not to mention the loads of audio, far more than at Kiziria's. You get used to the speakers' voice and Georgian starts to sound much natural. Overall, this is the most comprehensive Georgian textbook for beginners I've come across, and if its English edition wasn't so hard to be found, I'd recommend it as the main source for placing your Georgian close to a B1 level, that is, provided you had an introduction at Kiziria's book.

One more sentence from this book just to remind us that Georgian has POSTpositions, not prepositions. Notice that even the word for 'more', in 'more than two million decalitres' comes after the nominal group it refers to.

საქართველოში არის კლდეში ნაშენი მარანი, სადაც ორ მილიონ დეკალიტრზე მეტი ღვინო ინახება.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 414 of 758
11 September 2012 at 11:03pm | IP Logged 
In addition, I could finish dialogues 2 and 3 from Hewitt's last lesson. Now there are 12 pages on grammar plus two long dialogues and one long text. I think by the end of the week I'll have finished this book as well. This time I'm really wondering if I should go for Aronson's book all the way.

I just got two Russian books with audio and, considering I'm starting the Newspaper Reader tomorrow, if I start Aronson's I'll be doing only texts, no dialogues. Even if I've had so many dialogues at Nikolaishvili's, it's always a way of making the learning process less painful.

Well, in my opinion, Aronson's book will work mostly as a reference one I'll have been through it, just like Hewitt's. I don't really believe that every verbal form will stick into my head, what is most important now is that, whenever I have a doubt regarding a form, I know where to look it up - be it at Hewitt's learning grammar, Aronson's grammar, at the other grammar of Hewitt I haven't read yet or even at Tschenkéli's book. Regarding the latter, it has more consistent exercises than Aronson's book, but then I don't know German and I wouldn't want it to slow me down, considering that it's harder to translate from German than from Russian with Google Translator.

So, I assume I'll be studying Aronson's next week, but I'll have another look at my resources just to ensure it's the best move. You know, I always face that with Georgian whenever I finish a book.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 415 of 758
12 September 2012 at 7:32pm | IP Logged 
Finally I could start the Georgian Newspaper Reader. I hope I'm going to learn a lot from it, specially when it comes to decyphering the often unusual word order at the news. Let's examine the first story, there's a lot to learn:

რამდენიმე დღის წინათ საქართველოს ამერიკელი სტუმარი ეწვია, გენერალი ოთარ შალიკაშვილი. ისევე როგორც მისი ძმის გენერალი ჯონ შალიკაშვილი ჩამობრძანებამ, ბატონი ოთარის ჩამოსვლამაც მაშინვე მიიპყრო საინფორმაციო საშუალებების და საზოგადოებრიობის ყურადღება.

An attempt to translate word-by-word:

Several days ago to-Georgia American guest visited, general Otar Shalikashvili. Just the same as his brother's general John Shalikashvili, Mr. Otar's arrival immediately-also attracted information means' and public's attention.

Translation posted at the book (thank you authors):
Several days ago General Otar Shalikashvili, an American guest, visited Georgia. The arrival of Mr. Otar Shalikashvili, just as the arrival of his brother, General John Shalikashvili, immediately attracted the attention of the news media and the public.

Some remarks:

1. If the verb ეწვია is in the aorist, why is the subject ამერიკელი სტუმარი in the nominative? I assume საქართველოს is an indirect object, hence the -ს.
2. Notice the "germanophile" word order, with indirect object coming first and verb at the end of the period.
3. Notice how "ჩამობრძანებამ" and "ჩამოსვლამაც" both carry the ergative ending, no matter if one is first introduce and the other is later mentioned followed "just as": they both are treated as subjects of the verb "attracted" by the case system.


1 person has voted this message useful



zecchino1991
Senior Member
United States
facebook.com/amyybur
Joined 3893 days ago

778 posts - 885 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 416 of 758
12 September 2012 at 9:45pm | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:

1. If the verb ეწვია is in the aorist, why is the subject ამერიკელი სტუმარი in the
nominative? I assume საქართველოს is an indirect object, hence the -ს.


Maybe ეწვია is a 4th conjugation verb? I'm not sure though... I'm a little rusty on this
stuff, but couldn't it also have something to with (like you said) the fact that there is
an indirect object (which is why the verb starts with ე)? But I don't know, I need to go
review verbs/cases now...:X


1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 758 messages over 95 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.3750 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2021 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.