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Georgian Notes, Doubts and Tips TAC 2013

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758 messages over 95 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 67 ... 94 95 Next >>
Danac
Diglot
Senior Member
Denmark
Joined 3980 days ago

162 posts - 257 votes 
Speaks: Danish*, English
Studies: German, Serbo-Croatian, French, Russian, Esperanto

 
 Message 529 of 758
25 November 2012 at 10:37pm | IP Logged 
Coming from the BCS languages, in case it's the same in Russian, maybe it should have
been "napišal" (=sh), not "napisal". In the BCS languages, "pisati" is to write, and
"pišati" is to urinate, piss.
1 person has voted this message useful



zecchino1991
Senior Member
United States
facebook.com/amyybur
Joined 3890 days ago

778 posts - 885 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Arabic (Written), Romanian, Icelandic, Georgian

 
 Message 530 of 758
25 November 2012 at 10:45pm | IP Logged 
On Google translate it gives п `исать as a translation for pee as you would say it to a
little kid. (I don't know what's up with the apostrophe...I just copied it the way it was
).
1 person has voted this message useful



Danac
Diglot
Senior Member
Denmark
Joined 3980 days ago

162 posts - 257 votes 
Speaks: Danish*, English
Studies: German, Serbo-Croatian, French, Russian, Esperanto

 
 Message 531 of 758
26 November 2012 at 12:07am | IP Logged 
When in doubt, Google
2 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3798 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 532 of 758
26 November 2012 at 4:34pm | IP Logged 
I'm glad Parlons Géorgien starts to shed some light through the darkness of Georgian perfect screeves and participles. Now I have more clearly an idea of how and when to use each participle. At Parlons, even though the sections are short, we get clear explanations alongside with comparisons to equivalent structures in French. That didn't happen often with Aronson, even though he resorts to examples in other languages, it happens at a morphological level and not at a syntactical level. Now I even start to get encouraged to go through those hard chapters at Aronson's again. he only thing I'm worried about is that the exercises are not very helpful at elucidating what is being taught. At this respect, Tschenkéli's exercises are fair better.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3798 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 533 of 758
26 November 2012 at 9:11pm | IP Logged 
I just used the extra time today for finishing Gamsaxurdia's section for good! No more weird words about horses and rocks. Now for Javaxishvili!
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3798 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 534 of 758
27 November 2012 at 9:16pm | IP Logged 
Javaxishvili's story seems indeed more down-to-earth, what makes it easier to follow. I've finished the third excerpt and even advanced a couple of pages at the second one, as time permitted me.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3798 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 535 of 758
29 November 2012 at 7:40pm | IP Logged 
Once again I have to praise Parlons Géorgien: I have finished the quick grammar section, that solved many of my doubts. Now I'm at a section about common expressions. You might say it's an ordinary phrasebook, but it's far from that. Every expression comes with an explanation on the grammar/word formation behind it as well as context. So, it's a phrasebook that actually still teaches you grammar. No wonder I praise French publishers so much. They don't have the "assumption of the dumbest" you find in English books, neither do they have the "assumption of the smartest" you find in German books. They simply bring something complicated and add familiarity to it, in a logical but fun way, helping a language book become what is meant to be, a bridge between two cultures.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3798 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 536 of 758
29 November 2012 at 8:05pm | IP Logged 
Wooha, what's that?! Jivaxashvili writes about maxixe, a Brazilian dance from the early XX century. That just made my day!!


1 person has voted this message useful



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