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emk
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 Message 745 of 1317
19 October 2013 at 12:34am | IP Logged 
J'ai travaillé un peu sur mon logiciel, et j'ai créé un tas de cartes, dont plusieurs du livre Le Père porcher. Voici une capture d'écran :



L'idée est d'importer une liste de phrases que j'ai créer ailleurs.

Et bien sûr, en ajoutant les cartes, j'ai trouvé plusieurs occasions pour faire de petites améliorations. C'est toujours comme ça.

Une carte

Susan, la petite-fille adoptive de la Mort (une histoire qu'il faut expliquer un jour), donne sa version satirique de « Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus » :

Quote:
Recto :

« Alors écoute-moi bien, dit-elle en respirant mentalement un grand coup. Partout où les gens sont bornés et déraisonnables… et partout où ils ont, en mettant les choses au mieux, la finesse d’attention d’un poulet pris dans un ouragan et la capacité d’investigation d’un cafard unijambiste… et partout où les gens sont bêtement crédules, pitoyablement attachés aux certitudes de la nursery et comprennent pour la plupart autant les réalités de l’univers physique qu’une huître comprend l’alpinisme… oui, Twyla : le père Porcher existe. »

Verso :

borné = Qui a des bornes, qui est limité par des obstacles. Horizon borné.
(Figuré) Qui est peu intelligent ; qui est intellectuellement médiocre.


Expugnator wrote:
emk, demain je vais commencer à lire "Extension du domaine de la lutte", je me souviens pas si c'était une recommandation à toi, mais il me semble très intéressant et je voudrais te remercier quand même !

Oui, c'est un bon livre, très court et amer, mais aussi très marrant. Je veux le finir un jour, mais en ce moment, je m'occupe des pirates. :-)

Edited by emk on 19 October 2013 at 12:52am

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tastyonions
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 Message 746 of 1317
19 October 2013 at 12:51am | IP Logged 
J'ai pensé immédiatement à ce passage :
Quote:
Who would these fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death --
The undiscover'd country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns -- puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?

Et en effet, ça vient du français. :-)

Edited by tastyonions on 19 October 2013 at 12:53am

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emk
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 Message 747 of 1317
19 October 2013 at 9:54pm | IP Logged 
tastyonions, tu as déniché un merveilleux exemple. :-)


I made some good progress on Le Déchronologue, so I rewarded myself by adding some statistics to my SRS collection tool:



Even with quite aggressive marking of interesting phrases, there just aren't that many useful new words in a book these days. I'm averaging less than one card per page:

Le Pont de la rivière Kwaï: ~75 cards
Le Père Porcher: ~188 cards

I'm more optimistic about Le Déchronologue, which is 550+ pages long and full of fun nautical vocabulary (much of which I actually want to learn—I don't need it often, but when I do, circumlocution gets pretty tedious).

Anyway, I love this card format. In my experience, even the weirdest sentences and the most difficult vocabulary become much easier when the cards mature after 20 or 30 days. And these sentence cards are lots of fun, because they always remind me of the book.

I can think of some other features that I would love to have:

- A Chrome plugin for capturing sentences from web pages as a I read.
- An Anki plugin for importing cards directly from the site.
- An Android application for importing text snippets from other programs.

Sadly, life is short and software takes quite a long time to write. I am, however, quite willing to provide a REST API if anybody else gets excited about such things.
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sctroyenne
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 Message 748 of 1317
20 October 2013 at 3:13am | IP Logged 
emk wrote:

- A Chrome plugin for capturing sentences from web pages as a I read.
- An Anki plugin for importing cards directly from the site.
- An Android application for importing text snippets from other programs.

Sadly, life is short and software takes quite a long time to write. I am, however, quite
willing to provide a REST API if anybody else gets excited about such things.


It would be great to have a sort of Evernote universal clipping/capture system geared
towards language learning (speaking of, anyone have a system for using Evernote for
language learning)?
1 person has voted this message useful





emk
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 Message 749 of 1317
20 October 2013 at 3:54am | IP Logged 
sctroyenne wrote:
It would be great to have a sort of Evernote universal clipping/capture system geared towards language learning (speaking of, anyone have a system for using Evernote for language learning)?

I've never quite figured out Evernote, but I do like the idea of a universal SRS collection system. In fact, if your clipping tool can export a text file, you can paste it straight into my "Bulk Import" window.

I have a certain process for improving my passive skills, which goes something like this:

1. Consume large amounts of media (my Super Challenge will be 95% done when I catch up on data entry).

2. Occasionally find some interesting bits that I don't understand.

3. Feed those interesting bits into Anki, annotating and researching as needed. This is where the pipeline tends to break down.

4. Introduce ~10 new cards/day in Anki, discarding any cards which annoy or bore me at any point.

5. Wait for the cards to "mature" in 20 to 30 days, which is often accompanied by a really noticeable improvement in my understanding. Cards that were difficult to read become easy; cards with incomprehensibly slurred speech are suddenly clear.

This process works (for me!) for just about any passive skill: reading, listening, vocabulary, memorizing fixed phrases, and so on. The problem is that the pipeline breaks down at step (3). This isn't fatal, of course, because 80% of the learning takes place in steps (1) and (2). But that other 20% often needs more drastic measures. (I still don't remember what tergiverser means! What an annoyingly difficult word.)

So I'm interested in optimizing step (3). I've used subs2srs, I've written custom scripts, I've done marathon data entry, I've done all sorts of things. This is just the latest attempt to join my extensive and intensive studies into a more efficient whole.

(Mind you, if anything, this kind of improvement in my passive skills usually hurts my active skills a bit, because I suddenly have lots of useful vocabulary just at the tip of my tongue.)

Anyway, I worked through all the cards from Le Père Porcher and now have a glorious Anki backlog of 219 new cards! By the time I finish those, I'll have more from my current book. I'm working the kinks out of my tool, and will share it with a couple of my most intrepid volunteers in a few weeks, once I've added user accounts. Although it would be fun to have a system where the SRS cards were shared by everybody at random… :-)

Edited by emk on 20 October 2013 at 4:01am

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songlines
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 Message 750 of 1317
20 October 2013 at 6:12am | IP Logged 
emk wrote:

(I still don't remember what tergiverser means! What an annoyingly difficult word.)


What a coincidence; I had tergiversation in my Quizlet sets. I believe it's the same word in English, but
one of those which I only vaguely knew, and was semi-unsure of. Essentially, it means "equivocation".

Eng-Eng: Webster
Fre-Eng:
Oxford


Edited by songlines on 20 October 2013 at 6:21am

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tommus
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 Message 751 of 1317
20 October 2013 at 2:30pm | IP Logged 
sctroyenne wrote:
anyone have a system for using Evernote for language learning)?

I am an avid user of Evernote for another purpose but only have a few notes related to language learning. Maybe if there are some good ideas, we could start a separate thread on something like "Using Evernote for Language Learning". But what would be the main utility?

1. Organized collection and storage.
2. Sharing
3. Tagging. Evernote can tag every note with one or more tags, such as 'verbs', 'nouns', 'English', 'French'
4. Search: Evernote can find every note with the search word, and highlight all occurrences
5. Capture of web pages, articles, notes

While these usages are all probably good, none seem especially great. But for those who like to keep their language learning resources very nicely organized, Evernote can do an excellent job.




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emk
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 Message 752 of 1317
20 October 2013 at 7:22pm | IP Logged 
songlines wrote:
What a coincidence; I had tergiversation in my Quizlet sets. I believe it's the same word in English, but one of those which I only vaguely knew, and was semi-unsure of. Essentially, it means "equivocation".

I've looked up and forgotten that word a half-dozen times. It's been my favorite example of a word that just won't stick. But just after reading your message, I stumbled upon another coincidence: I found a wonderful example phrase for tergiverser in Le Déchronologue, the phrase I've been looking for all this time:

Quote:
— Allez, topez là et dites-moi ce qui pourrait vous faire plaisir pour saluer votre retour.

J’aurais pu tergiverser encore, mais je décidai que l’heure n’était plus à la finasserie :

— Rappelez donc vos inspecteurs, susurrai-je, puisque nous sommes entre amis.

Lots of progress on Le Déchronologue since last night. I'm beginning to lose track of the flashbacks and flashforwards, but that's more or less the intent.

WARNING: Minor spoilers

This is really first-rate science fiction, for hardcore fans of the genre. The basic plot of the book is similar to Eric Flint's 1632—some people from modern era have wound up in the past, and they're changing history to better suit their goals. But in a brilliant subversion of the usual tropes, we know almost nothing about the time travelers themselves.

Instead, we see the consequences through the eyes of a very confused bystander, captain Villon. He's a classic, damaged anti-hero: a former revolutionary who saw his revolution turn into a nightmare, a privateer with some sense of honor, a drunkard, and a good man devoured by greed for technological marvels out of time. The historical aspects of the book are built with all the care you'd hope for in a historical novel about the Caribbean.

And as previously mentioned, the chapters are out of order, which leaves the reader almost as confused as the protagonist. This works surprisingly well, because some of the most important clues appear early in the story but late in the book.

If you're a voracious reader of science fiction who's also fond of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead and of Master and Commander, this is your book. Everybody else would do well to heed the warnings of this confused Amazon reviewer.

Edited by emk on 20 October 2013 at 7:44pm



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