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emk
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United States
Joined 3643 days ago

2615 posts - 8805 votes 
Speaks: English*, FrenchB2
Studies: Spanish, Ancient Egyptian
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 Message 209 of 1317
24 August 2012 at 3:20am | IP Logged 
Teango wrote:
L'égyptien ancien est vraiment une language très intéressante, surtout la
grammaire! Qui sait...peut-être il y aura quelques hiéroglyphes dans un grimoire dans
un épisode de Buffy bientôt. :)


Il y'en a beaucoup dans le film « Stargate ». En voilà une image :

Daniel Jackson traduit des hiéroglyphes (en)
Une explication (en)
L'histoire (en)

Ici, Daniel corrige une traduction et il dit : « Must have used Budge. I don't know why
they keep reprinting his books. Hopelessly out of date… ». Dans le film, on peut voir
le mot « rnp.t » en hiéroglyphes.

geoffw wrote:
I'm the first to say that language and worldview/identity are closely
tied up, but do you have any further insights into what it means to you to be forging a
new identity? Are you thinking of it in terms of primarily using French in certain
spheres of your life (e.g., I'm someone who speaks French at home, but maybe not at
work), or more of a cultural affinity (e.g., I'm someone who eats French food and cares
about African politics because my overall identity includes an affinity to La
Francophonie)?


Honestly, I haven't quite yet figured out how to explain this thought. It's still only
half-formed, and some of it is a little too personal for a public log.

Unlike some people, my personality is the same in both languages. This isn't too
surprising, since I'm mostly interacting with the same people.

But French isn't a hobby language for me, that I pick up and put down as needed.
(That's what I have Egyptian for.) Like the Montreal anglophones mentioned above, it's
crept into who I am. I use it at home, and I drift into it when I'm all alone and my
mind is still. And that's a very intimate thing. I want French to be a permanent and
major part of my life.

Culturally, I don't do fine French films, fancy French foods, or any of the other
things that Americans associate with French culture. Well, except for the cheeses and
the crepes and the Calvados and the salted caramel from Brittany. If you look at my
bookshelves, there's a lot of stuff about the larger Francophonie there—
Persepolis and Immigrants and MC Solaar and the history of Quebec. For
whatever reason, this is some of the most fascinating stuff that I've read in French.

Or, to approach it from another direction: I'm a voracious reader. I live among words.
Long-term, the breakdown of those words has to change in a very drastic way, especially
if I want to reach a high level of French while living in an English-speaking country.
But I have no intention of giving up English.

I'm sort of wandering around the periphery of the real issues here. Maybe I'll be able
to explain it better someday.
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sctroyenne
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Joined 3502 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 210 of 1317
24 August 2012 at 5:04am | IP Logged 
emk wrote:
Culturally, I don't do fine French films, fancy French foods, or any of the other things that Americans associate with French culture. Well, except for the cheeses and the crepes and the Calvados and the salted caramel from Brittany. If you look at my bookshelves, there's a lot of stuff about the larger Francophonie there—
Persepolis and Immigrants and MC Solaar and the history of Quebec. For
whatever reason, this is some of the most fascinating stuff that I've read in French.


This has been my favorite part of learning French and living in France - getting to learn about the culture and the people that doesn't conform to our stereotypes. Going out through On Va Sortir, doing conversation classes for a computer science school, and working in ZEP schools while au pairing in Neuilly-sur-Seine has allowed me to meet a wide variety of people and experience a lot of things that one wouldn't associate with Paris and France. I get frustrated a lot, actually, by ex-pat writers who just relay the same old stereotypes - either they just really don't get around or they consciously play to their audience's preconceptions of the French.
1 person has voted this message useful





emk
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Moderator
United States
Joined 3643 days ago

2615 posts - 8805 votes 
Speaks: English*, FrenchB2
Studies: Spanish, Ancient Egyptian
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 Message 211 of 1317
24 August 2012 at 6:16am | IP Logged 
Aïe ! La 24ème leçon d'Assimil : L'Égyptien hiéroglyphique était trop
difficile. Elle a présenté l'infinitif, le progressif, l'équivalent de "tandis que" et
huit nouveaux mots de vocabulaire—et elle a fait tout ça en deux phrases. Et Assimil
veut que je comprenne cette leçon à l'oral ? Berk ! J'ai passé une heure à apprendre
ça.

Quote:
꟣w sš ḥms.(w) m-bꜣḥ šnw.t
nt(j).t m ḏꜣt.t n(j).t nb
mk sw ḥr ꟣p bꜣk.w ꜥḳ.w
꟣w sḫt.w ḥr sḏm n wḏ.w n(j).w (꟣)m(j)-rꜣ šnw.t

Le scribe est assis devant le grenier
qui est dans le domain du maître.
Il est en train de compter les revenues et les provisions
pendant que les paysans écoutent les instructions du responsable des greniers.


Plus de « apprentissage intuitif », s'il vous plaît, et moins de force brute.

Il m'arrive parfois d'avoir ces problèmes avec Assimil. Mais à part ça, c'est un très
bon cours. Même si j'ai du mal avec cette leçon, je peux la comprendre après seulement
24 jours. En fait, je pense que j'ai déjà compris des textes plus difficiles que ceux
de ma quatrième année de latin.

sctroyenne wrote:
I get frustrated a lot, actually, by ex-pat writers who just relay
the same old stereotypes - either they just really don't get around or they consciously
play to their audience's preconceptions of the French.


I never really bought into that stereotypical image of France. Personally, my
recommended annual allowance of films d'art et d'essai is about 2 per year, I
have no real interest in nouvelle cuisine, and I like Paris best in small doses.
In fact, the whole concept of "high culture" leaves me horribly uninspired.

There are a vast number of things which I do adore about France, and some of them are
touristy enough: the Mont Saint Michel, the stupid movies like Taxi, the
surprisingly good bandes dessinées, the the coastline of Brittany, the vibrant
immigrant cultures, the little crêperies, the kind people—the list goes on and on. It's
a great country. But it's not the country which appears in those weird francophile
books like Bringing Up Bébé.
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
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United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
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739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 212 of 1317
24 August 2012 at 6:30am | IP Logged 
That's what I loved about the TV5 Monde channel. Not so much films d'art et d'essai, a lot of films that aren't even released here including some that are just merely popular. I rented some B-movies as well while in France and it's fun seeing their low culture. And for some real low culture try their reality TV - my "favorites" were L'Amour est dans le pré and Qui veut epouser mon fils.
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montmorency
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United Kingdom
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2371 posts - 3675 votes 
Speaks: English*, German
Studies: Danish, Welsh

 
 Message 213 of 1317
24 August 2012 at 4:07pm | IP Logged 
A little French gem that surprised us was the town of Bayeux. There is the tapestry, mais
oui, a cliché but still unmissable, but then check out the little town itself. Hard to
describe but just beautiful. And coming early, tired and hungry from the ferry, we found
that the only open café served English-style breakfast, but with typical French
panache. Formidable!
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emk
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United States
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2615 posts - 8805 votes 
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 Message 214 of 1317
24 August 2012 at 5:07pm | IP Logged 
montmorency wrote:
A little French gem that surprised us was the town of Bayeux. There
is the tapestry, mais oui, a cliché but still unmissable, but then check out the little
town itself. Hard to describe but just beautiful.


It really is a pretty little town. Here are some sites with photos:

The canal
The mill

We saw the tapestry in the new, climate-controlled museum under dim lights. And I read
that during World War II, someone cleverly pointed out to the Germans that the tapestry
was about a successful "Arayan" Norman invasion of England. The Germans became quite
protective of it after that…

If you're into old sailing ships, it's also worth checking out Rochefort, which has
some really cool stuff:

- La Corderie Royale made giant ropes for the navy

- The Hermione is one of the most spectacular wooden
ships in the world.
2 persons have voted this message useful



numerodix
Trilingual Hexaglot
Senior Member
Netherlands
Joined 4894 days ago

856 posts - 1226 votes 
Speaks: EnglishC2*, Norwegian*, Polish*, Italian, Dutch, French
Studies: Portuguese, Mandarin

 
 Message 215 of 1317
26 August 2012 at 1:52pm | IP Logged 
Bonjour emk,
Est-ce que t'arrive qu'après une periode pendant laquelle tu n'as pas écouté le français
il te faut te réchauffer pour retrouver de nouveau ta compréhension de la langue parlée?
Il y a quelques semaines que j'étais tellement synchronisé avec la langue que je n'avais
quasi du tout (quasi pas du tout?) des problèmes de comprendre quoi que ce soit. Puis je
suis allè en vacances pendant une semaine et après je me suis retrouvé dans la
circonstance, comme auparavant, de ne pas réussir à suivre bien une émission.

Puis j'ai fait deux heures d'un spectacle sur youtube et maintenant je le comprend bien
de nouveau.
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emk
Diglot
Moderator
United States
Joined 3643 days ago

2615 posts - 8805 votes 
Speaks: English*, FrenchB2
Studies: Spanish, Ancient Egyptian
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 216 of 1317
27 August 2012 at 5:00pm | IP Logged 
FR:
numerodix wrote:
Est-ce que t'arrive qu'après une periode pendant laquelle tu n'as pas
écouté le français il te faut te réchauffer pour retrouver de nouveau ta compréhension
de la langue parlée?


Oui. J'ai souvent besoin d'un ou deux épisodes de Buffy pour « réchauffer » mon
français. Je pense que c'est normal. Et fait, j'ai une théorie à ce sujet, mais d'abord
il faut que je apprenne les mots français pour « memory recall speed » et « priming »,
et je ne peux pas passer ce matin à lire Wikipedia.fr. :-)

EN: I sent my wife an email in hieroglyphs this morning. Your grammatical
corrections, as always, are extremely welcome. :-)

EGY:





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