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Indíritheach
Senior Member
United States
Joined 2641 days ago

108 posts - 146 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Spanish, Irish, French

 
 Message 161 of 336
07 November 2013 at 1:31pm | IP Logged 
sctroyenne wrote:
So I gave Learning Irish another try and I quite like it, actually! While the the
texts aren't necessarily the most realistic, they get the grammar points across and the
audio is great (at least now that it's not too overwhelming)! I'll be adding it to my
routine.

It would be nice to make an Anki deck out of it. Now, before I go spending hours
extracting audio and making cards, does someone else already have one they'd like to
share?


Go híontach!

And yes, I have an Anki deck made up of the first 4 lessons or so...I'm still working on adding new vocabulary whenever I can. I guess PM me if you're interested...I'll be at work for the next 8 hours but I should be able to send it to you this evening.
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sctroyenne
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Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 162 of 336
10 November 2013 at 8:11am | IP Logged 
I'm continuing to enjoy Learning Irish and I'm quite surprised at what I can
already translate without much hesitation. I'm not doing so badly after all! I feel like
I'm really absorbing the pronunciation from the recordings as well.

I spent the day watching (and re-watching) more Aifric. I enjoy the series and as I re-
watch episodes, especially after doing more study, I can pick out more of what they're
saying. For certain episodes that I've seen a few times now, I'm starting to feel like
the subtitles are hindering me from catching more in Irish and I look away. Still have a
long way to go but it's encouraging to feel I'm making progress!
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 163 of 336
13 November 2013 at 10:12pm | IP Logged 
So I've hit Lesson 6 in Learning Irish and as others have mentioned it's pretty tough.
It presents past and future forms of "to be" (including negatives, questions,
autonomous forms, etc), which already makes it kind of dense, but then all the lenition
and eclipsis rules learned so far are all mixed together. Written French is already a
minefield of potential mistakes but Irish seems exponentially worse. Every word I put
down after a preposition I have to ask myself should I be modifying it. I made a ton of
mistakes, though I will say in one case I went with what "sounded" right which was
encouraging since that's the intuition I eventually want to develop.

In addition, I had been coasting on vocabulary up until now since I've already learned
a lot of basics. The few words I didn't know yet I was content to look back for but now
they're piling up so I need to slow down and master what I've done so far. I figure all
the content that's presented in this lesson plus review of the previous ones would take
a good week or two in a class of presenting and drilling so I should plan on putting in
a decent amount of time. The next lesson presents past/present continuous and
conditional forms of "to be" plus introduces conditional statements which is a lot to
cover in two lessons.

The latest episode that was posted of Aifric doesn't have English subtitles (which was
especially frustrating since the last episode had a bit of a cliffhanger - it didn't
really get resolved though). It was a nice little exercise to see how much I could
catch. I could follow the story pretty fine due to context apart from a couple scenes,
and even managed to pick up on some details thanks to understanding some words. I
picked out some stuff here and there but it'll be a while until I can really dive into
un-subtitled stuff. I'm trying to find out if the DVDs come with Irish subtitles - if
they do I consider them a must buy.
1 person has voted this message useful



Indíritheach
Senior Member
United States
Joined 2641 days ago

108 posts - 146 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Spanish, Irish, French

 
 Message 164 of 336
13 November 2013 at 11:56pm | IP Logged 
sctroyenne wrote:
So I've hit Lesson 6 in Learning Irish and as others have mentioned it's pretty tough.
It presents past and future forms of "to be" (including negatives, questions,
autonomous forms, etc), which already makes it kind of dense, but then all the lenition
and eclipsis rules learned so far are all mixed together. Written French is already a
minefield of potential mistakes but Irish seems exponentially worse. Every word I put
down after a preposition I have to ask myself should I be modifying it. I made a ton of
mistakes, though I will say in one case I went with what "sounded" right which was
encouraging since that's the intuition I eventually want to develop.

In addition, I had been coasting on vocabulary up until now since I've already learned
a lot of basics. The few words I didn't know yet I was content to look back for but now
they're piling up so I need to slow down and master what I've done so far. I figure all
the content that's presented in this lesson plus review of the previous ones would take
a good week or two in a class of presenting and drilling so I should plan on putting in
a decent amount of time. The next lesson presents past/present continuous and
conditional forms of "to be" plus introduces conditional statements which is a lot to
cover in two lessons.

The latest episode that was posted of Aifric doesn't have English subtitles (which was
especially frustrating since the last episode had a bit of a cliffhanger - it didn't
really get resolved though). It was a nice little exercise to see how much I could
catch. I could follow the story pretty fine due to context apart from a couple scenes,
and even managed to pick up on some details thanks to understanding some words. I
picked out some stuff here and there but it'll be a while until I can really dive into
un-subtitled stuff. I'm trying to find out if the DVDs come with Irish subtitles - if
they do I consider them a must buy.


I'm also way behind on vocabulary...I'm on Lesson 16 now but still studying words from Lesson 5...as I've said before, this is a long-term commitment.

Let me know if they do come with Irish subtitles. I've been considering buying the DVD for my daughter and I to watch. Also, where have you been watching Aifric, on TG4?
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 165 of 336
15 November 2013 at 1:06am | IP Logged 
Well, I have to say that Irish learning feels like quite a roller coaster. I went over
the audio of lesson 6 over and over again. It really helped when I listen-read it with
the English translation focusing only on how "bí" was conjugated in each statement.
Trying to focus on everything tired me out, focusing just on the main verb conjugations
has been helping me solidify the main point of the lesson and my comprehension of
everything else seems to flow much more easily when I'm not trying to catch everything.
So there seems to be some light at the end of that tunnel.

That is until I looked at a comprehensive grammar again and got way overwhelmed. I'm
really hoping that taking everything one by one will make this all make sense.


Indíritheach wrote:

Let me know if they do come with Irish subtitles. I've been considering buying the DVD
for my daughter and I to watch. Also, where have you been watching Aifric, on
TG4?


Will do! Yup, on TG4.
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 166 of 336
19 November 2013 at 1:30am | IP Logged 
Getting ready to leave for my Irish immersion weekend! I'm pretty excited about it. I'll
have a report when I get back!
1 person has voted this message useful





jeff_lindqvist
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Moderator
SwedenRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 5505 days ago

4250 posts - 5710 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 167 of 336
19 November 2013 at 9:55am | IP Logged 
Enjoy your stay! I'm looking forward to reading you report.
1 person has voted this message useful



sctroyenne
Diglot
Senior Member
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3987 days ago

739 posts - 1312 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Spanish, Irish

 
 Message 168 of 336
23 November 2013 at 8:25am | IP Logged 
So just came back from the introductory evening with the Language Hunters Irish immersion weekend. I'll
have a lot more to say about the method later on once I've completed the session but I can give a few
remarks based on what I know so far. So the method is game-based and the game is designed to have
participants, even complete beginners, speak entirely in the language. They use TPR which serves several
functions: as a memory aid, as a clue to the grammatical structure without having to explicitly teach grammar,
and as a way to allow stronger speakers to teach what they know to new speakers in an easy way. This last
point is very important to their mission as they stated that traditional learning is very individual - a person with
a course or a text or in a traditional class with a teacher. This method is a way to build a language community
between complete novices with more advanced speakers. This aligns with their mission of saving
endangered languages by allowing these communities to teach each other.

Another important aspect of their methodology is they believe it's not about what you know but rather what
can you do. What you know can be measured by a test in a class for instance, but that doesn't mean a
student can use that knowledge in real life (hence why someone can study for years yet not be able to hold a
conversation). They start out not with greetings and introductions but rather with asking and answering the
"journalistic questions" who what where why and how. In our introductory round we learned and practiced
"what is this?" "This is a.." "Is this a...?" "Yes" "whose is this?" (Plus all the similar variations) and "where is
your...?" "It is on/under the..." Of course, being Irish there's a lot of complex grammar going on with asking
and answering these questions but it's all taught naturally.

They said they've been tweaking the game quite a bit as they've been conducting these sessions and a major
thing they've taken away is to respect the limitations of the brain to be able to focus on this kind of learning.
They adopt the Pomodoro technique by setting a timer with periodic breaks built in for when we work
intensively and exclusively in Irish. There are also "wild card" options that change the game up to snap
people back to attention such as switching seats, doing signs only, etc.

Tomorrow will be the most intense day so I'm off to rest up to make the most of it!


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