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French: Business, but not only

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352 messages over 44 pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 7 ... 43 44 Next >>
Expugnator
Hexaglot
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Brazil
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 Message 49 of 352
02 October 2012 at 10:20pm | IP Logged 
Il faut que je finisse ce livre French for Marketing avant le 11 novembre. Il y restent encore 18 textes avec des exercises. Chaque texte avec ses exercises a environ 10 pages. je lis toujours mon premier livre en français, je suis maintenant page 149, sur un total de 351. Je continue á chercher des mots inconnus dans le dictionnaire, je crois qu'il y a des mots que j'ai regardé 4 ou 5 fois, mais ce n'est pas quand-même déroutant de suivre l'histoire. Quelquefois quand je n'ai pas de dictionnaire avec moi, je suis l'histoire sans aucun problème.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3352 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 50 of 352
04 October 2012 at 7:21pm | IP Logged 
Today I came across the expression "De surcroît", meaning "Besides,...".
Are there other expressions that are more used, more colloquial?
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3352 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 51 of 352
05 October 2012 at 5:36pm | IP Logged 
I'm still reading the same book, only afew pages a day. Today I learned 6 pages without a dictionary. There were some words I missed but they didn't hinder me from understanding at all. Even at the chapter's title, there was the word "louange" I couldn't understand, but I just checked it now and figured out I guessed it right.
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tarvos
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 Message 52 of 352
05 October 2012 at 5:56pm | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:
Today I came across the expression "De surcroît", meaning
"Besides,...".
Are there other expressions that are more used, more colloquial?


Besides that = "mis à part ça" (from mettre, so setting apart that)
Besides (=what's more) = "en plus"

Edited by tarvos on 05 October 2012 at 5:57pm

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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3352 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 53 of 352
05 October 2012 at 7:16pm | IP Logged 
Les derniers mots du texte "iront certainement en diminuant" forment une
expression litteraire qui marque une certaine continuite dans Faction. Autres
exemples : La situation va en s'aggravant/Sa sante va en s'ameliorant/La
route va en s'elargissant.

Does that mean French used to have a continuous tense with the gerund and it became outdated and literary?
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tarvos
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 Message 54 of 352
05 October 2012 at 9:41pm | IP Logged 
En + gerund is always used as a temporal way of denoting things.

En attendant les résultats, je regardais la fenêtre...

(while waiting for the results... etc).

Edited by tarvos on 05 October 2012 at 9:42pm

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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3352 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 55 of 352
05 October 2012 at 9:58pm | IP Logged 
Yep I'm used to that, but the sentences I mentioned are different and at the book it is said they are more literary.

La situation va en s'aggravant.

In Portuguese, that would be a preferable usage, not a literary one:

A situação vai se agravando.

In English you'd use the verb "to keep" and not the standard continuous tense with 'to be':

The situation keeps getting worse.
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tarvos
Super Polyglot
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Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
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 Message 56 of 352
05 October 2012 at 10:46pm | IP Logged 
I guess it's just a particular way of expressing things. I don't recall having seen it
before, but maybe it's common in different kinds of texts.


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