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Shared Vocabulary in Slavic Languages?

 Language Learning Forum : Philological Room Post Reply
34 messages over 5 pages: 13 4 5  Next >>
a3
Triglot
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Bulgaria
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 Message 9 of 34
21 July 2012 at 7:41pm | IP Logged 
I had a few months ago a few lectures in Russian. I had read parts of books and internet articles before, but never dealt with spoken language. At first it was hardly understandable, but after 30 mins or so, I was understanding most of it. And I always thought the mutual intelligibility was a myth. (This is turning into mutual intelligibility thread anyway.)
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Serpent
Octoglot
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Russian Federation
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 Message 10 of 34
21 July 2012 at 9:27pm | IP Logged 
a3 wrote:
after 30 mins or so, I was understanding most of it.
That's why I believe in extensive listening :)))
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Einarr
Tetraglot
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United Kingdom
einarrslanguagelog.w
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 Message 11 of 34
22 July 2012 at 8:19pm | IP Logged 
Inspired by this thread, I took a couple of level tests. The former being in Russian, the latter - in French. It turned out that my score on both is intermediate.

Now, considering the fact that I've been studying French extensively for five years at school (in which we had to use it around 80% of the time), my Russian (in which I've never really attended a single class only sreading/watching stuff of my interest) is at the same level of proficiency.

Therefore, I can surely agree with the picture on the previous page. And in addtion I'd say that the mutual intelligibility between Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian is at at least 90% for the first and 95% for the second (at least to my own, personal perceptions).



Edited by Einarr on 22 July 2012 at 8:22pm

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Medulin
Tetraglot
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 Message 12 of 34
22 July 2012 at 9:03pm | IP Logged 
I understand Macedonian pretty well, but I can't understand Bulgarian (because of different phonetics, too many muffled and clipped vowels, and different/Russian-influenced vocabulary). Macedonian is the most vocalic Slavic language, Bulgarian is the most consonantal Slavic language. What I might understand in Bulgarian is hidden because of the Bulgarian pronunciation which is not really vowel-friendly.

Edited by Medulin on 22 July 2012 at 9:04pm

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prz_
Tetraglot
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Poland
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 Message 13 of 34
22 July 2012 at 9:06pm | IP Logged 
Interesing since Bulgarian doesn't have blends like krv as in Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian and Slovenian.
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Serpent
Octoglot
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Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
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 Message 14 of 34
22 July 2012 at 9:35pm | IP Logged 
I wonder if there's a difference between being consonantal and having consonant clusters?
Polish and Czech have plenty of clusters, but for example Polish sort of compensates for that by having nasal vowels where other Slavic languages have a vowel and a consonant. So yeah I'm not sure I'd call Polish consonantal either.
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a3
Triglot
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Bulgaria
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 Message 15 of 34
22 July 2012 at 9:39pm | IP Logged 
I think he's talking about the vowel reduction. Traditionally, a half of the Bulgarian dialects at most have any reduction, namely the eastern ones. The more further east you go, the strong the reduction becomes. However the trend is the vowel reduction to spread westwards.
Still, odds are a speaker from a western part of the country will pronounce clear and unreduced vowels. The transition between vowel reduction areas and the ones without any is smooth, there is no border.
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Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
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 Message 16 of 34
22 July 2012 at 10:19pm | IP Logged 
Is Russian consonantal then?


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