Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Endelig norsk. Igjen. Alltid - TAC 2013

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
338 messages over 43 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 30 ... 42 43 Next >>
Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 233 of 338
09 April 2013 at 9:37pm | IP Logged 
Once again I managed to do two lessons in a row at Linguaphone, lessons 4 and 5. So far it's doable. It takes me much more time to read the notes (like in Assimil). The vocabulary isn't repeated for each lesson, so, I still have to check the dictionary a few times. The audio is still slow, but helpful nonetheless.
1 person has voted this message useful



Ogrim
Heptaglot
Senior Member
France
Joined 4475 days ago

991 posts - 1896 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English, Spanish, French, Romansh, German, Italian
Studies: Russian, Catalan, Latin, Greek, Romanian

 
 Message 234 of 338
10 April 2013 at 10:44am | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:
I also came across this:

"Min kone leser i en bok", My wife is reading a book. The prepositional expression i en bok indicates that she is occupied reading a book, without finishing it. If you finish the book within the period of time mentioned, you would not use the preposition: Hun leser en bok hver uke, She reads one book every week.

I'd like to know whether this rule is still observed or is now obsolete.


Yes, there is a clear difference in meaning between "lese i" and "lese" Consider the following examples:

I:
Q: Hva gjør du?
A: Jeg leser en bok.

II:
Q: Hva gjør du?
A: Jeg leser i en bok.

In the first example, the answer implies that I have the intention to read a book from the beginning to the end. (Note that in present tense, it does not actually say whether I will finish the book, in past tense however, it is understood that I did finish it.)

In the second example, I am actually saying that I am reading a part of a book, an extract or a chapter. In the past tense, you would often expect it to be followed by an "at"-sentence telling what you have read: "Jeg leste i en bok at frukt er sunt". "Jeg leste i avisen at det snør i London".

4 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 235 of 338
10 April 2013 at 7:48pm | IP Logged 
I tried to do with Norwegian today the same I did with Russian yesterday, that is, skip audio since I was doing the lesson while on the bus. But then I remembered Linguaphone has tapes and I have to take note of where at the tape the next lesson starts, so I'm doing it now. I have the audio at the iPad but it's not split by lessons either. Anyway, I'm more and more inclined towards reading stuff in Norwegian.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 236 of 338
12 April 2013 at 9:01pm | IP Logged 
Once again I could do two lessons in a row. The texts and dialogues all seem so vivifull of life, so authentic despite their age! I have the dialogues and the notes open, and I only refer to the glossary about two, three times a lesson. I don't read the glossary anymore as I did in the first lessons.

I think Anki is playing an important role on familiarizing me with reading Norwegian. I do three Anki decks and it's mostly about sentences.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 237 of 338
15 April 2013 at 5:10pm | IP Logged 
Lessons 12 and 13 are over! This book has only 50 lessons, so I think I'm moving at a
good pace. With the dialogues from Linguaphone and the sentences from an Anki deck that
has audio, I think I'm getting accustomed to spoken Norwegian. Even my pronunciation
might have got slightly better. Norwegian is detaching itself from my other TAC
languages. Even though I started it on August, it's much better than Georgian or Russian
from whatever point of view: what I've learned, how much fun I have with studying it, the
support I have etc.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 238 of 338
18 April 2013 at 7:12pm | IP Logged 
Mission complete for lessons 17 and 18. Unfortunately lessons 19 and 20 are missing from my tapes, and so I'll have to do them in read-only mode (and no, I'm not speaking of computer documents).
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 239 of 338
23 April 2013 at 9:56pm | IP Logged 
I've done lessons 23 and 24. I like Linguaphone way better than Assimil! It took me a while to get used to the three-pages "layout", but I could succeed by opening the coursebook and the notebook side-by-side and the notebook again with the glossary at the tablet. The lessons get more and more straightforward and that's a good thing.

I'd like to know about other people's experience with Linguaphone, be it Linguaphone Norwegian or any other languages.
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5002 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 240 of 338
03 May 2013 at 6:53pm | IP Logged 
Today I finally became aware of the word "formiddag", which means late in the morning. I think that's what people usually employ when talking about their activities, because i dag morges and i dag tidlig ae usually when people wake up.

I learned it from a note on Linguaphone lesson 33 (out of 50). By this note alone you can see the difference in relevancy between the notes in Linguaphone Norwegian and in Assimil Russian Without Toil. While I have a useful note on concrete usage at Linguaphone, I come across a note from the word for "dinner" that declines the word "dinner" in several cases, then shows me how the verb "to have dinner" is formed in all tenses and aspects, as well as the adjective "dinner-related" and its declension. I'm not saying it is relevant, but nothing could overwhelm a learner more. Isn't the point to let the reader just assimilate the vocabulary? I could easily recognize other words with the "dinner" root after having come across the word for dinner itself if only the method allowed me so, instead of throwing up loads of forms and declensions.

Back to Norwegian, it will take me a few weeks before I finish Linguaphone and decide what to do next, but I'm learning a lot from Anki, as I'm coming across actual sentences with relevant vocabulary.


2 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 338 messages over 43 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 5.7969 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2024 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.