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Endelig norsk. Igjen. Alltid - TAC 2013

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tractor
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Norway
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1349 posts - 2292 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English, Spanish, Catalan
Studies: French, German, Latin

 
 Message 65 of 338
30 August 2012 at 4:07pm | IP Logged 
Medulin wrote:
Expugnator wrote:

How do you pronounce fortsatt? At the tape the woman says something like 'fortshatt'.

I guess it depends on which pronunciation you prefer: Eastern, Northern, Southwestern...In Oslo, you get a
lot of SH sound (Barcelona, Oslo)...in Bergen, Stavanger, Kristiansand, people say these with [s]. I haven't paid
attention to how Ingvild Bryn pronounces fortsatt on NRK news ;)

True. In dialects where r + t isn't merged into one sound (the "retroflex t"), but pronounced as two sounds /rt/, the
s in "fortsatt" is pronounced as [s], I think.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
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3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
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 Message 66 of 338
31 August 2012 at 10:54pm | IP Logged 
I'm done with lesson 21 from Assimil. I always do the review lesson right after the previous one, that is, I don't reserve one single day for reviewing. Today I didn't feel any inspiration to write sentences, probably because I already knew the vocabulary introduced from my previous attempt to learn Norwegian. In fact, I'm anxious about learning to read Norwegian and how it will affect my other Germanic languages.
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Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 5034 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 67 of 338
02 September 2012 at 12:02am | IP Logged 
How different is the language from books at Project Runeberg and contemporary bokmål? Would it benefit me if I tried to read books from 1850-1950 at this stage or just mess things up?
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ZombieKing
Bilingual Diglot
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Canada
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 Message 68 of 338
02 September 2012 at 12:05am | IP Logged 
All knowledge is helpful. Unless you want to chat with Norwegians and are worried you'll use archaic vocabulary, knowing old and out of date words shouldn't harm you. It should merely help you in reading other older texts :)
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Brun Ugle
Diglot
Senior Member
Norway
brunugle.wordpress.c
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1292 posts - 1766 votes 
Speaks: English*, NorwegianC1
Studies: Japanese, Esperanto, Spanish, Finnish

 
 Message 69 of 338
02 September 2012 at 8:17am | IP Logged 
ZombieKing wrote:
All knowledge is helpful. Unless you want to chat with Norwegians and are worried you'll use archaic vocabulary, knowing old and out of date words shouldn't harm you. It should merely help you in reading other older texts :)


On the other hand, Norwegian has changed a lot since then. Bokmål developed from Danish and has undergone a number of reforms to make it "more Norwegian." I don't know if it will hurt you exactly, but I think it would be like reading in another Scandinavian language in order to improve your Norwegian. Not quite, but almost. I would say that modern books would be better if you can get them. I had a look at a few of those texts and the language looked pretty old. It's not like English, where the language from a 100 years ago is merely a bit old-fashioned and formal. Norwegian from 100+ years ago is really quite different from the modern language.
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tractor
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Norway
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1349 posts - 2292 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English, Spanish, Catalan
Studies: French, German, Latin

 
 Message 70 of 338
02 September 2012 at 8:38am | IP Logged 
Some of the best Norwegian literature was written in that period: Ibsen, Wergeland, Hamsun, Undset, Bjørnson etc.
If you want to read what they wrote, you'll have to get used to the old fashioned language at some point. It's
probably best to wait until your Norwegian is stronger though.

Edited by tractor on 02 September 2012 at 8:39am

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Brun Ugle
Diglot
Senior Member
Norway
brunugle.wordpress.c
Joined 6488 days ago

1292 posts - 1766 votes 
Speaks: English*, NorwegianC1
Studies: Japanese, Esperanto, Spanish, Finnish

 
 Message 71 of 338
02 September 2012 at 11:14am | IP Logged 
Yes, that's what I meant if I perhaps wasn't clear enough. It's not that you should never read those kinds of books, but that it might confuse you in the early stages. (I wouldn't recommend Shakespeare to anyone learning English either until they were at quite a high level. Of course, I am aware that that is a much more extreme example since even natives can often barely understand him.) You should definitely read classics, but I think it is probably better to wait until maybe a B2 level. I think you mentioned that you were at about A2. Regardless of level, as long as you wait until you feel you have a fairly strong grasp on the modern language, I think classics are great and will give you insight into the culture and history as well as "improving your mind" and all those other things classics are supposed to do.

When I'm learning a language, I like to start reading as soon as I can, which means I have to start with fairly simple things. What those things are depends on the language. In Japanese, which I'm studying now, I find books for younger children to be much more difficult than those for young adults because of the way the written language works. When I studied Norwegian, at first I read a lot of comic books (I still do) and books for children around the age of 8 such as Anne-Cath. Vestly (Mormor og de åtte ungene, etc), then I moved on to books for young adults and then to somewhat light novels for adults (mysteries and such).

Reading things like Anne-Cath. Vestly books also gives you something of the culture since most Norwegians are familiar with these from their own childhoods. Even Donald Duck is so popular here that I've heard it referenced a number of times. So I don't see reading those kinds of things as a waste. Plus of course, in the early stages of language learning, you will be exposed to a lot of new vocabulary even from children's books.

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tractor
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Norway
Joined 5321 days ago

1349 posts - 2292 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English, Spanish, Catalan
Studies: French, German, Latin

 
 Message 72 of 338
02 September 2012 at 11:29am | IP Logged 
Donald Duck is indeed very popular in Norway.


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