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French, 22 years later - TAC 2013 PaX

  Tags: French
 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
70 messages over 9 pages: 1 2 35 6 7 ... 4 ... 8 9 Next >>
geoffw
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 Message 25 of 70
08 January 2013 at 4:40pm | IP Logged 
In that case it would be an implied comparison: "Is she always as amusing (as this/as she is right now)?"

In English, I myself probably wouldn't actually write "Is she always as amusing?" without anything further, because
it doesn't really sound grammatically correct, though I might say it in conversation if I'm not being careful.
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geoffw
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 Message 26 of 70
08 January 2013 at 4:45pm | IP Logged 
A better English translation might be "Is she always THIS amusing?"
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Quique
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 Message 27 of 70
08 January 2013 at 4:48pm | IP Logged 
geoffw wrote:
In that case it would be an implied comparison: "Is she always as amusing (as this/as she is right now)?"

In English, I myself probably wouldn't actually write "Is she always as amusing?" without anything further, because it doesn't really sound grammatically correct, though I might say it in conversation if I'm not being careful.

A-ha. I guess it's the same thing in French (hopefully a native or more advanced student will confirm it).

Thank you, geoffw :-)
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Cavesa
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 Message 28 of 70
08 January 2013 at 11:52pm | IP Logged 
Awesome log :-) I'm looking forward to reading it till december
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Quique
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 Message 29 of 70
09 January 2013 at 1:12pm | IP Logged 
Glad you like it, Cavesa :-)

Assimil: Did lessons 36 and 37.
New words: ouvreur (usher), ronfler (to snore), pourboire (tip), dormir vs s'endormir (to sleep vs to fall asleep).

I also took dictation from lesson 6 (#7 is a revision unit, so it doesn't have any recording).
I'm becoming a big fan of dictations. Today I noticed that facile and difficile always have a trailing `e', even in their masculine form.

Also: un livre vs une livre (a book vs a pound).


I found a few wordlists:A nice thing about the first two lists is that the words are grouped in categories.
They are pretty basic words and I understand almost all of them, but if I want my conversation to be more interesting that that of a 4-year old child, I should make sure that they are part of my active vocabulary. Time to use an SRS?
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akkadboy
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 Message 30 of 70
09 January 2013 at 1:51pm | IP Logged 
Quique wrote:
geoffw wrote:
In that case it would be an implied comparison: "Is she always as amusing (as this/as she is right now)?"

In English, I myself probably wouldn't actually write "Is she always as amusing?" without anything further, because it doesn't really sound grammatically correct, though I might say it in conversation if I'm not being careful.

A-ha. I guess it's the same thing in French (hopefully a native or more advanced student will confirm it).

Thank you, geoffw :-)

I have no better explantion to offer :
"Est-elle toujours aussi amusante (qu'en ce moment) ?"

Nice log by the way !
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geoffw
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 Message 31 of 70
09 January 2013 at 3:12pm | IP Logged 
Quique wrote:
They are pretty basic words and I understand almost all of them, but if I want my conversation to
be more interesting that that of a 4-year old child, I should make sure that they are part of my active
vocabulary. Time to use an SRS?


Not to suggest you shouldn't learn these words, especially if you dream of speaking like a native one day, but I
really wouldn't worry too much about it. The life of a four-year-old is very different from the life of an adult, and
the commonly-needed vocabulary of an adult is not simply an expansion on the commonly-used vocabulary of a
small child, especially depending on the context you're discussing. I say learn whatever words you like, but don't
expect this list to be the key to conversational proficiency.

For example, while an American English-speaking child will definitely have good control over words like
bellybutton, potty, and pee-pee, it's extraordinarily unlikely that you'd need these words, even passively, in a job
interview. They're fairly unlikely to pop up at the bar / pub, either. (In fact, my computer automatically corrected
"potty" to say "potter," thinking it was a mistake and not in the dictionary, even though it's one of the most
common words used by 2- and 3-year-olds.)

An interesting side effect of this difference shows up for people like me (with my German) who learn a language as
a child, stop using it for years, and then try to pick it up again as adults. Not only did I not learn all the vocabulary
my peers were learning as adolescents and young adults, but a good bit of my core vocabulary that I had mastered
became far less useful, so that even after shaking of the rust, what used to classify me as a fluent and proficient
speaker left me, at first, unable to express the simplest of "grown-up" sentences.
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Quique
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 Message 32 of 70
10 January 2013 at 11:38am | IP Logged 
Heh, you're right, geoffw.
I didn't know the work `potty' in English; and now that I do, I don't think I'll use it that often.

Merci par la confirmation, akkadboy.

Assimil: Did lesson 38, which introduces the futur tense, and took dictation from #8.

Dictations keep helping me to notice details:
- Unlike in English, `adresse' is written with a single `d'.
- `Pas grand-chose de bon'. Why `grand' and not `grande'? Now that I think of it, why `grand-mère' and not `grande-mère'?

French in Action: I watched episode #6.


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