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Cheap Language Learning

  Tags: Low budget
 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
43 messages over 6 pages: 13 4 5 6  Next >>
nathdep
Diglot
Newbie
United States
Joined 2229 days ago

11 posts - 15 votes
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese

 
 Message 9 of 43
03 November 2013 at 7:37pm | IP Logged 
Thank you all for the great suggestions!

I didn't realize there was so much out there to use for free.

I do have a question, though. How should I set a goal for myself to learn the languages? I know that in a traditional setting, I was able to hold a substantial discussion in French in about three or four years. Would the time frame be different since I am trying to learn on my own?

I also want to note that in my traditional, classroom setting, I was always bored as we moved too slow. How should I pace myself?

Merci beaucoup! :)

Edited by nathdep on 03 November 2013 at 7:38pm

1 person has voted this message useful



montmorency
Diglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 3013 days ago

2371 posts - 3675 votes 
Speaks: English*, German
Studies: Danish, Welsh

 
 Message 10 of 43
03 November 2013 at 11:25pm | IP Logged 
nathdep wrote:
Thank you all for the great suggestions!

I didn't realize there was so much out there to use for free.

I do have a question, though. How should I set a goal for myself to learn the
languages? I know that in a traditional setting, I was able to hold a substantial
discussion in French in about three or four years. Would the time frame be different
since I am trying to learn on my own?

I also want to note that in my traditional, classroom setting, I was always bored as we
moved too slow. How should I pace myself?

Merci beaucoup! :)



Hi, great that you are interested in learning Welsh (among other languages), and SSiW
has already been mentioned. For that particular course, the advice they give is to move
on to the next lesson as soon as you are giving most of the replies without hesitation
before the female voice cuts in with the "correct" answer. For "most", say about 80% of
the time.

A lot of the material comes up again in later lessons, plus there are also free weekly
practice sessions.

The aim is that the further into the course you get, to use the pause button less and
less, since in a real life conversation, you don't have a pause button. OTOH, in a real
life conversation, you can politely ask the person to speak a little more slowly, or to
repeat something, so of course you can cut yourself a little slack in the lessons.


One of the things they encourage you to do, as well as the lessons is to listen to
Radio Cymru, which you should be able to do from the USA via the internet (probably not
the live broadcast, but you should be able to "listen on demand" to already broadcast
materials, plus there are podcasts, e.g. "Pigeon" which is aimed at learners.

You can also watch the Welsh language TV channel, S4C via a service called Clic. But
for this you will need to use a web proxy service. I have never used it, but I've seen
"expatshield" recommended.

S4C Clic

One good S4C programme to watch, especially if you do the northern course is "Rownd a
Rownd". It is a soap, but somewhat aimed at learners. You can choose Welsh, English or
no subtitles (as you can with most S4C programmes).

If you like "noir" style detective drama, try "Y Gwyll", a new series that's just
started.


EDIT: Another great programme on S4c, aimed specifically at learners is called "HWB"
(which I'm guessing means "hub", as in the centre of a wheel).

HWB on S4C Clic



Edited by montmorency on 07 November 2013 at 2:31am

2 persons have voted this message useful



tlanguell
Newbie
United StatesRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 2224 days ago

24 posts - 54 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Vietnamese

 
 Message 11 of 43
06 November 2013 at 7:33am | IP Logged 
Below is a complete archive of FSI courses:

http://fsi.antibozo.net/files/

Complete DLI archive:

https://jlu.wbtrain.com/sumtotal/language/DLI%20basic%20cour ses/

Kickass.to has a lot of language torrents such as Michel Thomas, Pimsleur etc.

Too bad you don't live in Asia here I can buy movies, games, and software for $5 a
disk.

I'm starting to learn German because I have a pretty Vietnamese colleague who also
studies German and I want to talk to her :)
2 persons have voted this message useful





Iversen
Super Polyglot
Moderator
Denmark
berejst.dk
Joined 4888 days ago

9078 posts - 16470 votes 
Speaks: Danish*, French, English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Swedish, Esperanto, Romanian, Catalan
Studies: Afrikaans, Greek, Norwegian, Russian, Serbian, Icelandic, Latin, Irish, Lowland Scots, Indonesian, Polish, Croatian
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 12 of 43
06 November 2013 at 10:41am | IP Logged 
My expenditures on language learning are mostly limited to dictionaries, grammars and travelling. You can find the rest for free on the internet.
3 persons have voted this message useful



Ari
Heptaglot
Senior Member
Norway
Joined 4767 days ago

2314 posts - 5695 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Mandarin, Cantonese
Studies: Czech, Latin, German

 
 Message 13 of 43
07 November 2013 at 6:41am | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
My expenditures on language learning are mostly limited to dictionaries, grammars and travelling. You can find the rest for free on the internet.

Dito, except I don't buy much dictionaries or grammars or travel very much. :) For most languages there are excellent dictionary apps if you have a smartphone. Some cost money, some are free. Learning a language is a very cheap hobby. There are all kinds of free resources on the Internet.
1 person has voted this message useful



I'm With Stupid
Senior Member
Vietnam
Joined 2358 days ago

165 posts - 349 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: German, Vietnamese

 
 Message 14 of 43
07 November 2013 at 8:54am | IP Logged 
I haven't used it myself, but I've heard good things about this website for German:
http://www.dw.de/learn-german/german-courses/s-2547

I presume that your university has a modern languages section, so there's got to be plenty of books aimed at learners in the library, and possibly even copies of stuff like Pimsleur and Michel Thomas (or if not, they might be in the public library).
1 person has voted this message useful



Cavesa
Triglot
Senior Member
Czech Republic
Joined 3194 days ago

3277 posts - 6778 votes 
Speaks: Czech*, FrenchC2, EnglishC1
Studies: Spanish, German, Italian

 
 Message 15 of 43
07 November 2013 at 2:52pm | IP Logged 
Well, I think cheap learning, even if you take away things "against the copyright"
(pure download for your personal use is legal in most countries, torrents are not),
comes down to several points:

1.Using the good quality free sources and tools. FSI is a very good exemple, so is
Anki, the deutsche welle website or lernu. Yes, the offer is narrower when it comes to
small languages but settling for crappy resources won't get you anywhere. THere are
tons of free sites with too little amount of real information and even with mistakes.
Some more great free tools: italki.com, lyricstraining.com, duolingo.

2.Finding the cheaper choices of commonly used things. For example the site
germanpod101 is of very good quality for a reasonable monthly price and they have a lot
of languages, including small ones. The key is not to pay for more months than
necessary. Get them for the months you are sure to have time for the resource, not for
a month when you are busy with other things and still primarily using something else.
On the other hand, there are many similar things, online courses, podcasts and so on
that cost several times more money for similar content. Always do your research, many
tools get a cheaper "clone" with similar features these days.

3.Using libraries and second hand bookstores. The best base resources still come mostly
in paper. Look at what is available in your library. If your universtiy teaches some of
your target languages, you will surely find at least something in the library. If there
isn't much, try second hand bookstores. You can find jewels for marvelous prices this
way. And truth be told, if you are like me, the late return fees may sometimes cost
nearly as much as the second hand book and you still may not be done with it when you
say goodbye. ;-)

4.Using the student discounts, eshops with free delivery etc. 1 more expensive but
great quality resource may take you much further than several cheap ones. If you want
it, you can find significant difference in prices between various shops. Discounts,
free delivery (for example bookdepository.co.uk or deastore), copies with damaged cover
etc, that all can make the price drop significantly (up to 1/3 of the price from my
experience).
5 persons have voted this message useful



Chung
Diglot
Senior Member
Joined 5341 days ago

4228 posts - 8254 votes 
20 sounds
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: Polish, Slovak, Uzbek, Turkish, Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 16 of 43
07 November 2013 at 4:58pm | IP Logged 
nathdep wrote:
Hello everyone!!

I'm very excited to be here!

Just to introduce myself, I am a freshman in college located in NY majoring in French and piano. I have a
passion for
languages and am actually planning on taking French, German, and Spanish all next semester.

I haven't started any courses in Spanish. I'm taking a German 101 class now but the professor can't teach
very well.

Here are some of the languages I'm interested in learning:

Russian
Welsh
Romanian
Swedish

I really like the more guttural, Germanic sounding languages.

As you can imagine, I don't have much money since I am a college student.
Is there a way that any of you have learned a language without spending too much money? I realize that the
only way to learn a language completely is by living in a foreign country. Do you have any simple
ways that don't cost too much money but are effective?

Thank you so much and I'm excited to start my quest to become a polyglot!


In general it's possible to learn (or at least get a solid background in) several languages without spending a dime (assuming also that you want to keep things on the level and avoid illegal downloading), although these languages tend to be the "popular" ones such as French, Spanish or Mandarin.

If you do venture off the beaten path, things get dicier, and you'll probably have to shell out a bit if there's anything available at all.

A good place to start looking for material that's available legally and for free is So you want to learn a language.


5 persons have voted this message useful



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