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VonPeterhof’s log - 旅立ち’14, Yürükler’15+

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Evita
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Latvia
learnlatvian.info
Joined 4787 days ago

734 posts - 1036 votes 
Speaks: Latvian*, English, German, Russian
Studies: Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 105 of 158
21 September 2014 at 9:02am | IP Logged 
vonPeterhof wrote:
Starting from Monday I did one Talk To Me In Korean lesson per day, getting to lesson 2 of part 2 by today. Can't say I felt comfortable listening to the test dialogue, but apparently I did get the majority of the words and constructions that had actually been introduced in the lessons, as well as manage to figure out at least one word that hadn't - 피자=pizza :)


I remember I was very upset when I listened to that test dialogue after level 1, they were speaking so fast I could barely catch anything. That sparked my resolve to listen to natural Korean much more.

Quote:
Today I met up with some of my Korean relatives who aren't really fluent in Korean but are big fans of K-dramas. When I told them that I had watched Boys Over Flowers they said I should have chosen something else. They recommended the political drama Empire of Gold, the comedy A Gentleman's Dignity and the coming-of-age drama/comedy Reply 1997. I had heard of the latter show and was somewhat interested in watching it for its perspectives on the changes Korea underwent in the past couple of decades and the roots of modern South Korean pop culture, but I'm somewhat intimidated by the fact that it's set in Busan and features dialogue largely in the Gyeongsang dialect. While I won't be able to understand natural dialogue in any sort of dialect at this point, it's still probably better to leave the introductions to the dialects until later, when I've got some grip on at least the standard grammar.


Oh no, Boys Over Flowers was one of the worst dramas I've ever seen. I dropped it by episode 5 and the only reason I lasted even that long was because it was so famous. I have no idea how it got the big ratings that it did.

I haven't seen Empire of Gold but I've heard good things about it and it's on my to-watch list. I have seen Reply 1997 and while it's a good drama I agree that you better wait a while before watching it. By coincidence, I'm watching A Gentleman's Dignity right now and it's fun enough, I suppose. The characters do talk very fast sometimes, I even have to pause to read the subtitles.

I would recommend the following dramas to you:

Secret Garden - it was one of my first dramas and I enjoyed it very much
Two Weeks - if you want to check out a good action drama
It's Okay, It's Love - this one finished only recently and I thought it was very good.
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vonPeterhof
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Russian FederationRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3007 days ago

715 posts - 1527 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, EnglishC2, Japanese, German
Studies: Kazakh, Korean, Norwegian, Turkish

 
 Message 106 of 158
21 September 2014 at 4:06pm | IP Logged 
Thanks for the recommendations, Evita! I've actually decided to postpone watching K-dramas until after I'm done with the grammar lessons, but I'll definitely get to them once I dive into native materials. Right now the exposure I get to Korean outside the lessons is limited to songs by Kim Kwang-seok (of whom I only heard thanks to that song by Die Orsons).
1 person has voted this message useful



vonPeterhof
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Russian FederationRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3007 days ago

715 posts - 1527 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, EnglishC2, Japanese, German
Studies: Kazakh, Korean, Norwegian, Turkish

 
 Message 107 of 158
04 October 2014 at 3:43pm | IP Logged 
Welp, it's that time again, for the last time this year - I'm kicking off a new season of anime by reviewing the first episodes of two comedies by, for and about otaku. When I reread the post almost an hour after uploading I realized that I had accidentally misspelled もっと as もった in the penultimate sentence. What I find interesting is that, as of now, only one of the people correcting and commenting seems to have understood my intention and corrected the た to と. Most of the others didn't do anything to the sentence, probably because they didn't catch the typo. One person removed the word completely, which sounds sorta weird to me, since I tend to associate the construction "Xよりもっと" with the English construction "more than X", with もっと corresponding to "more" and より to "than". Well, if a native speaker feels that より is fine on its own then I guess I have to accept that it's not the same as saying "while watching this show I laughed than when I was watching that other show" in English.

Like I said in the preface to the post, I intend to take up fewer series this time. If I manage to, I intend to spend more time on reading Japanese and, eventually, Korean. If not, then business as usual ;)

In other activities, I've made another minor change to my daily routine - since the units in しごとの日本語 電話応対基礎編 are so short I decided that I should do one per day rather than per week. This hasn't worked out so well this week, since I had to finish up lots of stuff at work due to my week off coming up, so most of the evenings I was too tired to do all my scheduled activities (Anki, shadowing conversations, TTMIK, 電話応対) and had to drop one or two of them.

Last weekend I had travelled to Saint Petersburg, then to my birthplace of Gatchina and back to Moscow. Those travels gave me lots of time to read, so I finally got through Fate/Zero's prologue and started reading Act I. Unfortunately, that's still a bit less than the material covered by the first episode, and with this week being as busy as it was I didn't manage to read any of it since my return to Moscow. My reading tempo had increased near the end of the prologue, but it's still quite slow. I'm thinking of trying to rewatch the episodes I've seen and see if I still get as little out of them as the first time. If my comprehension gets noticeably better I might try to stick with the anime, if not I'll try to read the book after all.

While taking a break from the Fate/Zero anime I started checking out another work by Gen Urobuchi, 仮面ライダー鎧武 (Kamen Rider Gaim). While I've watched several Power Rangers series as a kid (as well as the seemingly much reviled American remake of Kamen Rider, Masked Rider), this is the first time I'm watching one of the original Japanese tokusatsu series. So far it feels like at least the Power Rangers series I've watched captured the feel of the genre pretty well (I don't remember Masked Rider well enough to comment on that one). The interesting thing I've noticed so far it that this particular series is gleefully aware of its own silliness and doesn't shy away from poking fun at all the cheese for the benefit of the casual viewer, but in a way that doesn't alienate or belittle the true fans of the genre. Since it's aimed at a slightly younger audience the language is much easier to follow than Fate/Zero, but from what I hear it does get pretty dark later on (they don't call Gen the (Uro)butcher for nothing), so I guess I've found a more accessible way to get my Urobuchi fix for now.

In other news, on Monday I had the pleasure of meeting one of this forum's celebrated contributors, Solfrid Cristin, who was visiting Moscow this week. I only managed to spare the time for a quick lunch in a department store near the Red Square, but we had an interesting chat about language learning and beyond. Since my Norwegian is badly out of practice I didn't even attempt to say anything in it and we never switched to Russian either, but she did seem very confident ordering the food and interacting with strangers in Russian. Definitely more confident than I was in Norwegian even after 3+ months in Oslo. Meeting other forum members in person is certainly an interesting experience; now I'm regretting the fact that I didn't make arrangements to go to the polyglot conference next weekend (especially since I did end up taking a week off now, and Serbia is one of the few countries where we Russians don't need a visa).

My plans for the week off mostly revolve around reviewing anime on lang-8, lunching at Japanese restaurants, attending another Japanese gathering at the MSU and going to Saint Petersburg for a birthday next weekend. Now it's time to watch some more new anime.
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vonPeterhof
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Russian FederationRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3007 days ago

715 posts - 1527 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, EnglishC2, Japanese, German
Studies: Kazakh, Korean, Norwegian, Turkish

 
 Message 108 of 158
05 October 2014 at 7:04pm | IP Logged 
Wrote the next entry, this time about two action/fantasy series. Apparently I keep using のですから where a simple ので would have sufficed - this is probably the fourth time I get this correction. However, I'm also (perhaps excessively) pleased with myself for having managed to work in a grammatical pattern I picked up from the Dictionary of Advanced Japanese Grammar, the "XといいYといい" I used in the first sentence of the second review.

The second show I reviewed here is a new adaptation of one of the scenarios from the Fate/Stay Night visual novel, to which Fate/Zero is the prequel. One of the commenters said that it's easier to follow than Zero, since the main character is a beginner mage learning how to use magic, so the viewers are eased into the material, whereas Zero either presupposes the knowledge or dumps it in long expository speeches. On the other hand, nearly everyone I hear from considers Zero to be a vastly superior work, with assessments of F/SN ranging from "a very interesting idea with inconsistently good execution" to "creepily misogynistic piece of trash". Oh well, since the first episode of F/SN's current adaptation has apparently already spoiled who's gonna die in Zero for me, might as well try watching them both.

Today I finished level 2 of TTMIK by listening to the test dialogue. This time I feel like I got a lot less than out of the first one: the only thing I got is that they kept saying something about learning Japanese (and, on one occasion, Chinese). Perhaps I should change my approach to making Anki cards - for the past several lessons I've rarely added more than one sentence per lesson. When adding the sentences I tend to prioritize new vocabulary over variety of uses of grammar points, and since they keep reusing the same words from lesson to lesson I don't feel the need to add many of their example sentences. This has probably resulted in insufficient exposure to the grammar points. Perhaps I should try adding more of the example sentences, or just download a shared deck based on TTMIK.
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Evita
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Latvia
learnlatvian.info
Joined 4787 days ago

734 posts - 1036 votes 
Speaks: Latvian*, English, German, Russian
Studies: Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 109 of 158
05 October 2014 at 8:21pm | IP Logged 
vonPeterhof wrote:
Perhaps I should try adding more of the example sentences, or just download a shared deck based on TTMIK.


You can try my sentence deck, it's based on TTMIK but there are also sentences from other resources because sadly TTMIK's coverage of grammar is not quite complete. I'd be happy to hear some feedback about the deck. Sometimes it seems that I spend more time working on it than actually studying Korean.
3 persons have voted this message useful



vonPeterhof
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Russian FederationRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3007 days ago

715 posts - 1527 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, EnglishC2, Japanese, German
Studies: Kazakh, Korean, Norwegian, Turkish

 
 Message 110 of 158
05 October 2014 at 10:37pm | IP Logged 
Wow, thanks, that looks great! I thought I noticed your name there last time I checked the Korean decks :) I'll definitely try it out. Right now the only change I would make is adding a Hanja field to the back, but I'm not sure how much demand there would be for that, especially since this isn't a vocab deck.

Edited by vonPeterhof on 05 October 2014 at 10:38pm

1 person has voted this message useful



Evita
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Latvia
learnlatvian.info
Joined 4787 days ago

734 posts - 1036 votes 
Speaks: Latvian*, English, German, Russian
Studies: Korean, Finnish

 
 Message 111 of 158
06 October 2014 at 8:58am | IP Logged 
Yeah, I don't think adding hanja to this deck makes sense, but I have a separate vocabulary deck and I might add it there.
1 person has voted this message useful



vonPeterhof
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Russian FederationRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3007 days ago

715 posts - 1527 votes 
Speaks: Russian*, EnglishC2, Japanese, German
Studies: Kazakh, Korean, Norwegian, Turkish

 
 Message 112 of 158
06 October 2014 at 7:55pm | IP Logged 
I guess that's just my Japanese habits - reading normal written Korean gives me kanji withdrawal, so I feel the need to "complete" it with hanja wherever possible :)

Today I went to a bookstore and got myself an Ilya Frank book in Korean - a fairy tale collection. I'm a bit cautious in using fairy tales - the language in them may be easy for native children, but I also think it tends to be somewhat different from normal spoken language (I wonder if there's a Korean equivalent to the Japanese Kamikata dialect that only old people and nobles in fiction use). However, since this is apparently the only Ilya Frank book for Korean available so far I'll take what I can get. I also bought copybooks for practising Armenian and Arabic handwriting - maybe learning to actually produce the characters manually will help me remember and distinguish them better. There was also another book I was considering buying - a rather massive Russian textbook of Hanmun, i.e. Classical Chinese as used in Korea. I do intend to take up Classical Chinese at some point, but until now I've been considering doing it either through Japanese or through modern Chinese (preferably with Cantonese readings rather than Mandarin ones). However, that book looks so good I'm starting to think about doing it through Korean, or maybe just using the book to read up about the specifics of Classical Chinese in Korea. Since the book isn't exactly cheap, I'll have to think about it a bit more :)

After the visit to the bookstore I finished writing the next entry, this time about three series.


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