Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

PMs TAC 2015 crazy? French course mission

 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
451 messages over 57 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 49 ... 56 57 Next >>
1e4e6
Octoglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 2596 days ago

1013 posts - 1587 votes 
Speaks: English*, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Norwegian, Dutch, Swedish, Italian
Studies: German, Danish, Russian, Catalan

 
 Message 385 of 451
29 May 2015 at 8:27pm | IP Logged 
Actually it is not so simple. If anyone has the chance to test out life in their
favoured country, it would be ideal, if you have time and money, to spend some free
time there, especially a month or a few. If you can get a part time job for a year
there, even better.

If I did that right now, that is to say, move to Spain, Argentina, Italy, Netherlands,
or Norway for 6 months or a year, spending money on the airfare and accommodation in
this state, I would not be surprised at all if I ended up homeless at the end of the
trip. The financial situation is, to be nice, very poor right now, which explains why
if I took even one week holiday to a different continent I would be in seriously deep
shit. The last time that I actually went on holiday was September 2012, to give a
perspective. But if you have money, you should try it. I ususally take a holiday at
least once a year, even when I was younger, three times a year was normal. Now it is
0.

It is true, also, that most of the people whom I know are either unemployed or in low
payed jobs. Ironically, the people whom I know who make more money or are in a better
financial state, are those from the supposedly "f*cked up" financially countries. Some
of my acquaintances from Spain, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Ireland not only have
better financial situations, but also seem less stressed and enjoy life more than the
people who end up on government assistance in the UK and USA. There surely are some
idiots in the USA though who think that the poor people deserve their plight. They
also probably believe that people should speak English and nothing else. Unfortunately
their view seems to be gaining in popularity.

In my hometown, Manchester, each time I went to the city centre to have to buy my food
or whatever, I used to go sometimes to the Arndale Centre, if anyone knows it. Right
down Market Street, and I always saw homeless, some who would talk amongst themselves
about how they were screwed by living in the UK and how they were just middle class or
working class people who crashed economically in the past years. I started off from
being from a working class background, but now it seems like working class is a
finanancial step up. So exactly what my class is, not sure. Borderline government
assistance class?

As I said, my family were doing reasonably okay in the 1990s. In the latter half of
the 2000s and increasingly more in the 2010s we have been destroyed financially. When
I talk with my friends from Argentina, Spain, Italy (and in their respective
languages!), they do not seem to have this problem. In fact, they seem happier...
1 person has voted this message useful



PeterMollenburg
Senior Member
AustraliaRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3782 days ago

821 posts - 1273 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: FrenchB1

 
 Message 386 of 451
31 May 2015 at 3:51am | IP Logged 
iguanamon wrote:
PM, garyb, How many times have you seen people talk to death
learning a language on HTLAL? "Which course should I use? Is TY better than Assimil?
How do I learn vocabulary?". You know what the response usually is. Well, people can
talk to death moving to another country and sorting out their lives too. I see it all
the time here in the Virgin Islands. People come down on holiday, or find out I live
in the VI and ask me, "how can I do what you do?". I always say "buy a ticket" or
"just make the move". It may sound simplistic but so many folks fail to do that
because they want to have everything down pat and arranged first, before making the
move
. This almost always results in paralysis by analysis. Good, that means there
are fewer people moving here!

I've had people go through the list with me- "Is it safe?", "Where's a safe place to
live?", "How can I make a living?", etc. , etc. etc. These days I have little patience
to answer them. I tell them, "it's as safe as you want it to be, use your wits like
you would anywhere else". "You can make a living by doing two simple things here- show
up and do what you say you're going to do". Of course, there has to be a need for
what you do in the first place, but if there is, that advice will serve you well.

I tell folks, if you do want to live here then come down for an extended period- at
least four weeks but don't be on vacation. Don't be a tourist. Try to live like a
local. In the VI that means not having air conditioning and not eating out in
restaurants all the time. Get a condo with a kitchen and shop for groceries like we
do. Better yet, find the local farmers' market. Go to the hardware store, drive around
the interior of the island to get a feel for the neighborhoods. Talk to local people.
Volunteer locally. Talk to people who do what you do, or what you want to do, for a
living. See if it's right for you. See if you like living here as opposed to
being on vacation here.

Then if you do all this and you've investigated your opportunities to make a living,
just move and start your life. It will be tough at first, no doubt about it. You'll
have to have some savings to rely upon at first. If you have made progress after six
months, odds are you will continue to do so. If not, analyze your situation. Correct
any mistakes and keep trying, or, go back home. It can be done. You can make
the move. I did it ten years ago and I don't regret it. Life is short. Pub talk is
cheap. I wish I had made the move 20 years ago, but I was paralyzed by analyzing. It
wasn't until I "just did it" that it happened.

I have seen single people make the move successfully and whole families too. People's
situations don't seem to matter as much as their attitudes. To change your latitude,
change your attitude.

If anyone is interested, I can provide a link that can help with attitude, life (and
even language learning too) zenhabits.

P.S. PM- I think this may be inspirational for you at this point in your life
zenhabits- My Story


FR

Salut iguanamon,

J'ai lu ce que tu m'as dit. En fait, je l'ai beaucoup réfléchi. C'est pourquoi que je
n'ai pas encore répondu. Je crois que tu as raison. Je crois que la réalité n'est pas
exactement le béton et que les choses peuvent changer avec nos esprits même. C'est
peut-être une question de perspective. J'ai enregistré ton lien, merci. Je le lirai
bientôt et répondre au sujet de là. Je ne sais pas ce que je vais faire exactement et
où je serai dans cinq ans. Mais une chose est certaine- que je vais continuer à
étudier le français. Avec ça ce sera au moins plus facile de travailler dans un pays
francophone. Merci pour avoir partagé ton opinion. C'est la réalité de la plupart des
gens qui veut habiter dans un ature pays, je suis d'accord. Peut-être que j'en suis un
de ces gens. Peut-être pas. On verra.

Savez aussi que j'ai essayé d'habiter aux Pays-Bas il y a 4 ans ma femme et moi. Elle
a voulu retourner en Australie. Moi, pas exactement. Mais c'est notre mariage, alors
on a du retourner. Maintenant elle veut retourner en Europe (moi aussi), mais elle a
raison quand elle me dit qu'on ne va pas le faire sans un emploi AVANT que nous nous y
installer, est notre avenir et famille est important aussi. Dans une situation
parfaite on vivraient la moitié du temps ici et la moitié en Europe. Ce n'est pas
exactement facile tu vois.

PM
-------------------
EN

I read what you said. I believe you are right. I believe that reality is not exactly
concrete and that things can change with our minds even. It's perhaps a question of
perspective. I recorded your link, thank you. I will read it soon and reply. I don't
know what I'm going to do exactly and where I will be in five years. But one thing is
certain- I'm going to continue studing French. With that at least it will be easier to
work in a Francophone country. Thanks for sharing your opinion. It's reality for the
majority of people who want to live in another country. I agree. Perhaps I am one of
those people. Maybe not. We will see.

Do know that I also tried to live in the Netherlands four years ago my wife and I. She
wanted to return to Australia. Me, not exactly. But it's our marriage, so we had to
return. Now she wants to return to Europe (me too), but she is right when she tells me
that we're not going to do it without a job BEFORE we settle down there, and our
future and family are important too- In a perfect situation we would spend half our
time here and half in Europe. It's not exactly easy you see.

1 person has voted this message useful



PeterMollenburg
Senior Member
AustraliaRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3782 days ago

821 posts - 1273 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: FrenchB1

 
 Message 387 of 451
31 May 2015 at 3:53am | IP Logged 
Le mois de mai :

85 heures, 29 minutes des études de français.

Pas mal hein, le meilleur mois cette année en fait.



Edited by PeterMollenburg on 31 May 2015 at 3:53am

1 person has voted this message useful



Jeffers
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 3215 days ago

2151 posts - 3960 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Hindi, Ancient Greek, French, Sanskrit, German

 
 Message 388 of 451
31 May 2015 at 1:31pm | IP Logged 
I've got another couple of ideas for you to think about, PM. You've talked about the difficulty of getting into another country, but that applies mainly to wealthier countries. Have you considered going to work as a nurse in a poor Francophone country? I imagine they would have more demand there. The hitch there is that wives and children are often unhappy in those situations. Another possibility would be to find a summer placement somewhere in a charity hospital in a Francophone country, so do the same thing but short term.

My second idea is to look into working at an international school in some Francophone country. In that case, it wouldn't necessarily have to be a poor country. They usually have a medical centre, so they need nurses. The hitch there is that they usually expect both people in a couple to work at the school, which may or may not be a problem for you. But the advantages are that they usually provide housing and your children would be educated at a good school for free (or for a discount). It's worth a look anyway.

I agree that if you're going to a European country you need to have work arranged before you go. I'm not sure about Austrialians, but they wouldn't let an American in without something lined up.
2 persons have voted this message useful



PeterMollenburg
Senior Member
AustraliaRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3782 days ago

821 posts - 1273 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: FrenchB1

 
 Message 389 of 451
31 May 2015 at 1:59pm | IP Logged 
Jeffers wrote:
I've got another couple of ideas for you to think about, PM. You've
talked about the difficulty of getting into another country, but that applies mainly
to wealthier countries. Have you considered going to work as a nurse in a poor
Francophone country? I imagine they would have more demand there. The hitch there is
that wives and children are often unhappy in those situations. Another possibility
would be to find a summer placement somewhere in a charity hospital in a Francophone
country, so do the same thing but short term.

My second idea is to look into working at an international school in some Francophone
country. In that case, it wouldn't necessarily have to be a poor country. They
usually have a medical centre, so they need nurses. The hitch there is that they
usually expect both people in a couple to work at the school, which may or may not be
a problem for you. But the advantages are that they usually provide housing and your
children would be educated at a good school for free (or for a discount). It's worth
a look anyway.

I agree that if you're going to a European country you need to have work arranged
before you go. I'm not sure about Austrialians, but they wouldn't let an American in
without something lined up.


Thanks for your input Jeffers, good things to consider for sure. I realise, you know,
that all in all it seems like i'm very much a person that can't be satisfied, and as I
get older this is becoming more apparent as my expectations and standards generally
rise in light of my disappointment with the state of many things in the world
(enforced/very STRONGLY encouraged vaccination programs for example). Such things
count me out of many 3rd world style health care/aid work avenues which I would not
leave my family to do, but still a worthwhile suggestion. I don't agree with many of
the practices (certainly not all by a long shot- these ppl need help, I don't think
they need bullshit science). It's very intersting when you look into the spread of HIV
throughout parts of Africa and mass vaccination programs that took place in the very
same areas in the years prior. I don't mean to land you in a hot spot here or to yet
again bring up this sore point, i'm just providing an example of why many people
willingly try to assist me then I throw in a "yeah, but..." Perhaps I need to learn to
turn a blind eye despite my opinion or remain content with limited/no choices. This
can even impact my potential for work in a 1st world country (hasn't happened in my
own... yet) as nurses are increasingly simply expected to vaccinate themselves (and
their families). This is in part why I am at odds with the work I do. Pharmaceutical
companies have a huge amount of control over people when it boils down to it, and in
summary I do not for a second feel it's for the good of the people and I will not
support that any further than I have to depsite being a 'pusher' in the hospital I
work in. Okay so this is just one example. Perhaps there are countries in which I
could help with construction or sanitation works and attend to a few wounds etc-
perhaps there are in fact many programs that don't compromise my moral standards...
but I can't see myself leaving my family for that. Still I should remain open to it,
and despite my seemingly strong reaction Jeffers I wholeheartedly appreciate your
response.

On a positive note I would not be under the same scrutiny in Europe as most non-
Europeans as I hold an EU passport (NL). Unfortunately tho, my nursing qualifications
are not immediately recognized throughout the EU and that is problematic. But as you
suggested there are other options and this is definitely worth considering as it had
only recently been suggested to me by someone else as well, so I think that's good
enough reason to investigate further.

Thank you Jeffers, sincerely.

PM
1 person has voted this message useful



Mohave
Senior Member
United States
justpaste.it/Mohave1
Joined 2313 days ago

291 posts - 444 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: French

 
 Message 390 of 451
31 May 2015 at 2:39pm | IP Logged 
PeterMollenburg wrote:
Le mois de mai :

85 heures, 29 minutes des études de français.

Pas mal hein, le meilleur mois cette année en fait.



Very impressive! How you do this month-after-month is impressive indeed! Have you given any more
thought to taking the B2 exam later this year?
1 person has voted this message useful



PeterMollenburg
Senior Member
AustraliaRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3782 days ago

821 posts - 1273 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: FrenchB1

 
 Message 391 of 451
31 May 2015 at 3:09pm | IP Logged 
Mohave wrote:
PeterMollenburg wrote:
Le mois de mai :

85 heures, 29 minutes des études de français.

Pas mal hein, le meilleur mois cette année en fait.



Very impressive! How you do this month-after-month is impressive indeed! Have you
given any more
thought to taking the B2 exam later this year?


Hey Mohave,

Thanks for the praise Mohave :)

I have given the B2 exam more thought... I'm likely to sit it in November, although I
could delay until March. I'm not sure what's best... passing it either way, or passing
it well. I guess that's what I expect, but I may not even pass it at all, who knows. I
do a lot of volume (hours) but I don't know about my methods. Many people think my
methods are a bit idiotic (doing so many courses, doing a LOT of same level courses).
I feel very strong in what I do know so far, but I don't feel upper intermediate by
anyone's standards. I think my level would be best described as a very solid B1 even
if I feel I could pass a B2 exam, perhaps just. I can barely use the subjunctive (I've
not really used it much in my courses) and don't have a good grasp on more complex
grammatical structures- not to mention I simply should be speaking much more but I'm
not. And native TV still baffles me for the most part probably because I'm using so
many lower level courses. Well if anything with 10,000 flashcards my vocab is slowly
but surely increasing and that's gotta help for something. And my pronunciation and
automaticity still feels very good. Speaking wise, meetups are a pain to get to as I
usually work in the evenings, and I currently am simply not enthused at all with skype
style conversational exchanges. Either way I'll sit the exam and see how I go, just
not sure if later this year or early next. Thanks for asking Mohave :)
2 persons have voted this message useful



smallwhite
Pentaglot
Senior Member
Australia
Joined 3614 days ago

537 posts - 1045 votes 
Speaks: Cantonese*, English, Mandarin, French, Spanish

 
 Message 392 of 451
31 May 2015 at 4:42pm | IP Logged 
PeterMollenburg wrote:
On a side note, can I ask your thoughts on reading vs courses? I began using courses
HEAVILY and then moved to a mixture of half intensive (course) study and half
extensive (reading/ subtitle reading in L2/ watching with L2 as main audio)... I have
read that you need extensive coverage to readlly come across enough words enough
times, but if doing only intensive courseswork with SRS as well you're not too likely
to need that extensive coverage by reading are you not?


All of the courses I've seen are just elaborated phrasebooks, so they serve a completely different purpose than reading, and I don't know how to compare the two. I've done very few courses and I've never done "intensive courseswork with SRS" so I cannot say or predict how it'd work out. Reading has various benefits, but if the purpose is to memorise vocabulary, to get repeated exposure to an already-learned word, I find SRS much more efficient.

My experience is that I do well although I don't read much. However, I listen to the radio and my grammar & vocabulary are strong, so I guess either radio+grammar+vocab make up for the lack of reading, or radio+grammar+vocab are more important that reading.


2 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 451 messages over 57 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.3594 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2020 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.