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Scandinavian word of the day

 Language Learning Forum : Skandinavisk & Nordisk Post Reply
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Iversen
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 Message 25 of 50
06 February 2014 at 3:09pm | IP Logged 
I Danmark har vi morgenmad, der spises om morgenen. Og så er der brunch, som nogle spiser om formiddagen. Derefter en gang middagsmad, der er varm mad, eller .. (oh, I just realized that this thread is written in English, sorry)

In Denmark the eating occasions are labeled as follows:

in the morning: morgenmad
before noon: brunch
noon: middagsmad (hot) or frokost (not hot)
late afternoon: aftensmad (sometimes called middagsmad if it is hot)
late evening/night: natmad
And snacks in between the meals: "mellemmåltider"

6 minutes about "dyrlægens natmad" here (dyrlæge: veterinarian)

Edited by Iversen on 06 February 2014 at 4:39pm

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Solfrid Cristin
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 Message 26 of 50
07 February 2014 at 11:52am | IP Logged 
Aquila123 wrote:
Norwegian names of the meals:

frokost or morgenmat - breakfast

formiddagsmat or lønsj - lunch

middag - dinner

kveldsmat - supper

nattmat - a meal during the night

niste or nistemat - food to take with you and eat on journeys

By the way: The word "nattmat" has a rather high frequency.




I have not heard morgenmat used ever, and formiddagsmat not since I was a little girl (and even then only by a woman who was born around 1900, and would use lunch 9 times out of 10).

Nattmat is something I would not hear used more than once every second year or so. Typically if you have a party that reaches into the early hours of the morning, and you serve the main meal around 8, and a hot soup at 2 o'clock in the morning.
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Iversen
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 Message 27 of 50
07 February 2014 at 11:58am | IP Logged 
With the food prices in Norway in mind I find it totally natural that you haven't heard the names of half the meals since time immemorial - I also have to stop eating when I'm on holiday in Norway. But given the liquour prices up there I don't understand how you can have parties without taking up a mortgage in your house.

Edited by Iversen on 07 February 2014 at 11:58am

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prz_
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 Message 28 of 50
07 February 2014 at 12:40pm | IP Logged 
If you stop, what poor Poles (like me) should say? :D

EDIT: I guess that Ylvis should write a new version of their song - "What does poor Pole say?".

Edited by prz_ on 07 February 2014 at 1:56pm

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Aquila123
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 Message 29 of 50
07 February 2014 at 1:43pm | IP Logged 
Taking up mortgage is exactly what Norwegians do, directly or indirectly, resulting in the Norwegian population sinking steadily more into unmanageable dept. Everything is criminally expensive here' and people's income is not capable of providing both home and living. When I use the word "criminally" I mean it litterally.

The population manages to keep a high living standard by borrowing steadily more money, but this trend will result in total collapse in the Norwegian society before not very soon.

By the way, Norwegian:

lån (n) - loan or mortgage
pengelån (n) - mortgage, used when you will specify only.
utlån (n) - something lent out, including money, books, things
innlån (n) - a bank term denoting a bank borrowing money from somewhere
låne - to borrow and also to land
låne bort / låne ut, bortlåne / utlåne - lend, used only to specify
låne inn / innlåne - borrow, used seldome and only to specify
penge (msg), penger (mpl) - money, most often used in plural

In Norwegian, and surely also in Danish and Swedish, you can make compositions rather freely, as the need materializes, so you could hear many other combinations too with the word "lån", made just for the actual need.



Edited by Aquila123 on 08 February 2014 at 3:35pm

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prz_
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 Message 30 of 50
07 February 2014 at 1:59pm | IP Logged 
På svenska också "(ett) lån".
Borrow - låna.
Money - pengar.
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Iversen
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 Message 31 of 50
07 February 2014 at 2:15pm | IP Logged 
In Danish:

udlåne (verb) = låne ud = 'lend' in English
udlån (substantive)

...
indlån (substantive)

låne (verb) = 'borrow' in English
lån (substantiv)

"Indlån" and "udlån" are almost exclusively used about banks, "lån" can be established by private people, and you can also "låne" books at the library. Instead of *indlåne (which is rare bordering on non existant) we use the expression "sætte penge i banken". However we can "låne fra" anybody - at least in theory.

Penge is always singular (except jokingly about foreign coins or bills when we can't remember the correct word)

Edited by Iversen on 07 February 2014 at 2:22pm

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daegga
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 Message 32 of 50
07 March 2014 at 3:22pm | IP Logged 
korp - en - ar
Swedish word for raven.
isl. hrafn
da. ravn (edited from rafn, this was older Danish or even Old Danish)
no. ravn
You can see the pattern.

Swedish wikipedia tells us:
Quote:

Arten har ett utpräglat, djupt, skorrande, dovt lockläte; korrp, som ofta
upprepas 3-4 gånger, vilket är diagnostiskt och kan urskiljas från andra kråkfåglar
även av en mer ovan fågelskådare.


This would explain the difference in vocabulary.

Edited by daegga on 07 March 2014 at 3:33pm



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