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Is this text translated correctly?

 Language Learning Forum : Skandinavisk & Nordisk Post Reply
nathdep
Diglot
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 Message 1 of 7
08 March 2014 at 10:03pm | IP Logged 
I know a person that claims he speaks Norwegian but I'm a bit suspicious that he just put the saying into
google translate. Can you check to see if it was?



Du har gjort ditt trekk , tungen har trippet ut i avgrunnen av mørket du kaller en munn , og bringer hat og
vondt . Du har såret den jeg elsker , du har brakt tårer fra ansiktet hennes , og dette er grunnen til at jeg hyle
opp Yggdrasil : ikke mer ! Du vil møte vreden til Tyr som dine urettferdige handlinger er brakt før ham .
Lenket til veggene i Helheim ville være din skjebne , men dette er skjebnen til en felles Oathbreaker , jeg ber
om at alle Far har sett denne grusomheten , og vil forsee din skjebne som as Thor spikre deg til Yggdrasil det
selv som verdens drage brenner kjøtt og ravnene fryder oss over det . kan ditt sanne farger tvinge de rundt
deg til å vokse et hat for deg , kan du aldri sove over handlingene du har begått . Kan maten du skyve ned så
grådig slå til aske og sot i munnen . kan dine forfedre som ser over deg i skam sende de døde for å minne
deg om denne skjebnen , kan du tilbringe resten av ditt sløsing livet vite det hviler på dine skuldre . Som
Torden Bjørn Jeg står foran gudene slik at de vet at dette er min kommando , og du kan falle hjelpeløs mot
det!

Edited by Fasulye on 11 March 2014 at 4:46pm

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DavidStyles
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 Message 2 of 7
08 March 2014 at 10:51pm | IP Logged 
A better speaker of Norwegian than I will surely weigh in shortly, but meanwhile and for sport's sake, I'll observe:

Not 100% sure it's GT, but it certainly has mistakes either way.

It's interesting that he left "Thor" as "Thor" and "Oathbreaker" as "Oathbreaker", rather than rendering them into Norwegian.

Normally it's easy to tell GT renditions of things since GT sucks with word order, but Norwegian word order is often pretty close to English.

Suspicious is that plugging this NO into GT returns near-perfect EN, and plugging that EN into GT gives almost this exact NO. That doesn't often happen with human translations, especially with a text this length, so many opportunities to choose different words - even with something with fairly simple language like this.

I'm interested to know if the use of "til" here is correct - it seems weird to me, but then, again, I don't know that much NO. Some constructions seem odd, like "dette er grunnen til at..." instead of simply saying "hvorfor". I mean, it's an incantation, not a lawsuit. But then, to each their own.
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DinaAlia
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 Message 3 of 7
08 March 2014 at 11:09pm | IP Logged 
Well, the grammar sucks, so that's indicative of GT; the syntax is just off, so that could be as well. The thing
about spaces on both sides of the commas is typically helpful when asking GT for help. Verdict: this is the work of
Google.

For the record, we call the thunder god Tor and the other word is edbryter – exactly the same word, in other words.
Who is Torden Bjørn, though? Tordenskiold? Is there a character called Thunder Bear that I haven't heard of?
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DavidStyles
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 Message 4 of 7
08 March 2014 at 11:25pm | IP Logged 
Alia brought to my attention that they also left "forsee" as English. Why was it left as "forsee"? Because in English it's "foresee", and GT didn't know what they meant by "forsee". Even a human looking up words in a dictionary would find the translation because they'd look for "forsee", find "foresee", and the appropriate translation from there.

Assuming they have a better Norsk dictionary than mine, which, I note sadly, doesn't have "foresee" (but is also really tiny, truly "pocket-size").
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DinaAlia
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 Message 5 of 7
08 March 2014 at 11:46pm | IP Logged 
Oh, I get it! It's Thunder Bearer!

Yeah, that paragraph certainly was not translated by someone who understands Norwegian.

Also, it's Allfar, or Allfader, not "alle Far". That doesn't even make sense as a fragment.
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Lizzern
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 Message 6 of 7
09 March 2014 at 12:45am | IP Logged 
That doesn't sound like it was written by a native Norwegian speaker at all... There are so many things about it that scream "this came from English!", way more than any native speaker would allow to slip past them if they were checking it for mistakes.

Liz
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Iversen
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 Message 7 of 7
09 March 2014 at 11:53pm | IP Logged 
KI also think this is a machine translation. DavidStyles' reference to the lacking translation of a falsely spelled word is close to a proof of this - Google translate knows "foresee", but not "forsee".

There are other uses of English patterns like "felles Oathbreaker" - where the missed translation of oathbreaker is accentuated by the translation of "common" to "felles", where something like "simpel" would have been better. And an "oathbreaker" is somebody who breaks an oath - an "edbryter" as indicated by DinaAlia, with 87.000 hits on a simple Google search. But apparently the word hasn't appeared in a bilingual text ("meneder" certainly has, but that's something different, namely a person who lies under oath). Anyway, it is a clear sign that the phrase originally was formulated in English, not in Norwegian.

And on top of that the mythological references are somewhat confused. Loke (or Loki in Old Norse) was chained to three rocks in a cave under a snake that constantly dripped venom - but that cave was not in not in Hel(heim). And as far as I know nobody was ever spiked to the world tree Yggdrasil, but Odin hanged himself in it for a while to get wiser.

Edited by Iversen on 10 March 2014 at 11:01am



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