Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Misused English words in EU publications

 Language Learning Forum : General discussion Post Reply
37 messages over 5 pages: 1 2 3 4 5  Next >>
Doitsujin
Diglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 4407 days ago

1256 posts - 2363 votes 
Speaks: German*, English

 
 Message 1 of 37
19 May 2014 at 3:11pm | IP Logged 
I've just stumbled upon an interesting list of misused English words and translations (PDF) published by the EU Translation Directorate. (The list seems to be primarily intended for lawyer-linguists working for the EU, because trained linguists are not likely to mix up most of the words contained in this list.)

IMHO, this list might also be useful for English learners.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Cabaire
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 4686 days ago

725 posts - 1352 votes 

 
 Message 2 of 37
19 May 2014 at 5:42pm | IP Logged 
Well, I suppose, EU documents are written in a mixture of Legalese and Globish, and do not have to reflect necessarily the use of native Britons, but the language established, when second language learners use it. If this community agrees that there is a verb "transpose", it exits in this dialect, no matter, what some autochthones think about it.
1 person has voted this message useful



Doitsujin
Diglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 4407 days ago

1256 posts - 2363 votes 
Speaks: German*, English

 
 Message 3 of 37
19 May 2014 at 7:20pm | IP Logged 
Cabaire wrote:
If this community agrees that there is a verb "transpose", it exists in this dialect, no matter, what some autochthones think about it.

If EU lawyer-linguists used their kind of EU English only among themselves, there would be no need for an official EU false friends list. However, since their legalese is apparently also read by non-lawyer-linguists, they'd also need to add footnotes to explain their lingo, because I seriously doubt that even linguistically inclined native English speakers would fully understand paragraphs such as the following:

Quote:
The Commission shall, on the basis of the information provided by the Member States, publish on its website the details of the provisions approved by each Member State which transpose Chapter 3 of Title XI of Directive 2006/112/EC.

1 person has voted this message useful



Henkkles
Triglot
Senior Member
Finland
Joined 3340 days ago

544 posts - 1141 votes 
Speaks: Finnish*, English, Swedish
Studies: Russian

 
 Message 4 of 37
19 May 2014 at 7:25pm | IP Logged 
Most people who study music would know what transpose means... in the given context. I know the verb to mean that when you take a song and make the key into D instead of the C you've transposed it a full tone upwards.
1 person has voted this message useful



Doitsujin
Diglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 4407 days ago

1256 posts - 2363 votes 
Speaks: German*, English

 
 Message 5 of 37
19 May 2014 at 7:45pm | IP Logged 
Henkkles wrote:
Most people who study music would know what transpose means...

Even most non-musicians know what transpose means, however, according to the EU false friends list, some EU lawyer-translators apparently think that transpose is a synonym for enact.

Edited by Doitsujin on 19 May 2014 at 7:48pm

1 person has voted this message useful



Medulin
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Croatia
Joined 3755 days ago

1199 posts - 2192 votes 
Speaks: Croatian*, English, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Norwegian, Hindi, Nepali

 
 Message 6 of 37
20 May 2014 at 10:10am | IP Logged 
Continental EU English (cEU) is an epitome of non-idiomatic English,
many times, not only wrong words are used, but non-idiomatic expressions as well:


1.
cEU English: We recommended you to take these steps.
L1 English: We recommended (that) you take these steps.

2.
cEU English: It is not allowed to smoke in enclosed public places.
L1 English: You are not allowed to smoke in enclosed public places.
or Smoking in enclosed public places is not allowed. or: No smoking in enclosed public places!


3.
cEU English: Quite better.
L1 English: Quite a bit better. or Quite a lot better.

4.
cEU English: Look at the sky. It will rain.
L1 English: Look at the sky. It's going to rain.

5
cEU English: Please speak slowlier.
L1 English: Please speak slower. or Please speak more slowly.


They should hire more English teachers and language experts from the UK and Ireland, instead of
relying on non-native ''experts'' and Google translate fans.

Just because L2 speakers use and understand things like: '' We recommend you to try the cake; It is not
allowed to smoke here; Quite better.; Look at the sky, it will rain; Please speak slowlier'', it does not make
them idiomatic English. EU legislators and Wikipedia staff should hire native speakers of English before
submitting materials of doubtful idiomatic quality made by L2 users of English (you don't see anything
wrong with things like ''please speak slowlier'').



Edited by Medulin on 20 May 2014 at 10:23am

3 persons have voted this message useful



1e4e6
Octoglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 3377 days ago

1013 posts - 1588 votes 
Speaks: English*, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Norwegian, Dutch, Swedish, Italian
Studies: German, Danish, Russian, Catalan

 
 Message 7 of 37
20 May 2014 at 10:22am | IP Logged 
"Quite a bit better" sounds strange, "quite" and "better" and any combination thereof to
me sounds quite odd in general.

"It shall rain" or "It will rain" sounds fine to me. The future simple expresses sureity.
"It is going to rain" simply sounds more informal.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Medulin
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Croatia
Joined 3755 days ago

1199 posts - 2192 votes 
Speaks: Croatian*, English, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Norwegian, Hindi, Nepali

 
 Message 8 of 37
20 May 2014 at 10:29am | IP Logged 
1e4e6 wrote:


"It shall rain" or "It will rain" sounds fine to me. The future simple expresses sureity.
"It is going to rain" simply sounds more informal.


You missed the point.

I was referring to the WILL future being used (by L2 speakers) in situations where GOING TO is used by
native speakers: Look at the sky... it will rain.

The opposite is also true. When we hear a ding dong sound, we say: I'll get the door.
But, I've heard non-native speakers say: I'm gonna get the door.


Will and going to future are indeed interchangeable in 80% of cases (will sounding more formal),
but in 20% of cases only one will sound right. If you're about to fall, you shout: I'm gonna fall,
and not I will fall... L2 uses of English often get these 20% wrong.

Edited by Medulin on 20 May 2014 at 10:34am



4 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 37 messages over 5 pages: 2 3 4 5  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.3281 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2022 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.