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Uses for a notebook in language learning

  Tags: Scriptorium | Writing
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25 messages over 4 pages: 13 4  Next >>
hrhenry
Octoglot
Senior Member
United States
languagehopper.blogs
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Speaks: English*, SpanishC2, ItalianC2, Norwegian, Catalan, Galician, Turkish, Portuguese
Studies: Polish, Indonesian, Ojibwe

 
 Message 9 of 25
27 June 2014 at 4:44pm | IP Logged 
If the notebook is good quality and something you'd like to keep, why not create a book of your own, original writing in your TL? It could be poems, essays or simply thought of the day.

I did that with Spanish as a teenager and recently found those old notebooks decades later as a jaded adult. It brought back fond memories and put a smile on my face.

R.
==

Edited by hrhenry on 27 June 2014 at 5:50pm

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BaronBill
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United States
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 Message 10 of 25
28 June 2014 at 7:41pm | IP Logged 
My notebooks are the central component to my language learning. That is the very first thing I buy when starting a new language. Everything else revolves around the notebook.

What do I keep in my notebook?
* Vocab words
* Grammar tidbits
* Useful phrases
* Sentence patterns
* Grammar constructions
* Conjugation tables
* Original sentences
* Doodles
* Translation exercises
* Anything related to the language at hand

My notebook goes with me anywhere I go. I review it constantly. It is a compendium of everything I have learned from other sources (books, audio, websites, etc) all in one easy to reference location. I would be lost without my notebook.

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Stelle
Bilingual Triglot
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Canada
tobefluent.com
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Speaks: French*, English*, Spanish
Studies: Tagalog

 
 Message 11 of 25
28 June 2014 at 7:55pm | IP Logged 
I use a notebook for dialogues from the various sources that I'm using. I write the Tagalog version on the left hand
page and the English translation on the right hand page. I have a playlist with the audio from different sources, and
I can review, read, shadow, etc the dialogues in the order that I've learned them.
2 persons have voted this message useful



soclydeza85
Senior Member
United States
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Studies: German, French

 
 Message 12 of 25
30 June 2014 at 3:28pm | IP Logged 
BaronBill wrote:
My notebooks are the central component to my language learning. That is the very first thing I buy when starting a new language. Everything else revolves around the notebook.

What do I keep in my notebook?
* Vocab words
* Grammar tidbits
* Useful phrases
* Sentence patterns
* Grammar constructions
* Conjugation tables
* Original sentences
* Doodles
* Translation exercises
* Anything related to the language at hand

My notebook goes with me anywhere I go. I review it constantly. It is a compendium of everything I have learned from other sources (books, audio, websites, etc) all in one easy to reference location. I would be lost without my notebook.


I'm the same way; my notebooks are pivotal to my learning, I carry them with me everywhere. I don't feel like I've "officially" started a new language until I've bought a notebook and labeled the cover accordingly (I know, his should be under the Language Geek thread).

My personal uses:
-Notes from grammar books (classroom style)
-Assimil work (notes, vocab, translations)
-Vocab lists (I write my lists over and over again to get them to sink in)
-Anything from my tutoring sessions
-Notes from movies/shows (words/phrases, anything for future translation)
-Exercises from workbooks
-Random entries (sometimes I'll just write a paragraph on something that happened during the day)
-Random stuff: if it can be written, I write it.

There's no limit to what you can do with them; but I would suggest using a physical notebook and not something on the computer. The physical act a writing things down will help them internalize. Thannks for making this thread, I actually got some good ideas from reading everyones' posts.



Edited by soclydeza85 on 30 June 2014 at 3:29pm

3 persons have voted this message useful





Iversen
Super Polyglot
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Denmark
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 Message 13 of 25
01 July 2014 at 1:22pm | IP Logged 
I make text copies, translations and retranslations on simple white paper with a margen left to the right for new words. I fold each sheet once to make it more handy, and I mostly transfer the new words to wordlists - which also are on white paper. And when I have made the wordlists and reviewed them I throw those piles of white paper away.

If I want to keep something - typically condensed grammar - I transfer it to thick green paper. Writing something on white paper is a signal that it will be thrown away soon. And paper notesbooks are too pretty and expensive for that.

But this discussion about (paper)notebooks against sheets of paper removes the focus from the central question: why write things down by hand (or keyboard) when you just can do copy paste on your computer? The answer is that you need to be slowed down to really notice the details, and then there may also be some kinetic component to the process - but for me it is not important. The reduction in speed is, and also the different ways I can work with the texts: jotting down unknown words, adding comments and maybe grammatical markers, doing hyperliteral translations and reconstructing the original from a translation etc. etc. Even writing a simple copy can be useful, but according to my experience only when I'm are working with comprehensible texts where the main point is to absorb the style and some expressions from the text.

Copy paste doesn't allow time for any of those things. You end up with a copy, but you didn't learn anything during the fraction of a second it took to make it.

Edited by Iversen on 01 July 2014 at 1:36pm

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BOLIO
Senior Member
United States
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Studies: Spanish

 
 Message 14 of 25
01 July 2014 at 10:07pm | IP Logged 
I love my notebook and wish I would have started it sooner. I am almost finished with ASSIMIL Spanish with Ease (Doing the entire book in Scriptorium). This notebook is almost full and I am on to the next one.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
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 Message 15 of 25
02 July 2014 at 1:06am | IP Logged 
You can try playing with the vocab too. No need to write down every sentence you make, just the cool/fun ones from native sources.

I myself don't use notebooks much, but I've written some custom annotations to poems for example.

Edited by Serpent on 02 July 2014 at 1:12am

1 person has voted this message useful



kujichagulia
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Japan
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Speaks: English*
Studies: Japanese, Portuguese

 
 Message 16 of 25
02 July 2014 at 2:51am | IP Logged 
There are a lot of good ideas for using a language notebook here. All of you gave great ideas for what to put into a notebook, but there is not a lot of detail about how you use the notebook to review. Do you just take some time to re-read your notes, or do you do something more elaborate? For example, make sentences orally or written with the vocab/grammar/sentence structures? Have a conversation with yourself using the new structures? Re-write notes? Collect vocabulary and put them into an SRS or make flashcards? Write an essay using newly-learned terms? Or simply re-read the pages until you are sick of them?

I think Stelle mentioned how she uses the dialogs she writes in her notebook(s), which is excellent. I'd like to hear from a lot of you as well about this point.


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