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Phrases from "Den som draeber" (Danish)

 Language Learning Forum : Skandinavisk & Nordisk Post Reply
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RadinaM
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 Message 9 of 16
20 August 2014 at 5:52pm | IP Logged 
@Iverson, thanks again! Though it may seem as too much of phrase nit-picking for my actual level of knowledge, my experience is that I tend to assimilate whole phrases much better than individual words, especially with visual input. Sometimes I can precisely remember the movie or a TV show from which I actually picked up a particular phrase I just used in conversation. It happens mostly when I speak English (since I've been exposed to it longer), and to a lesser extent for other languages. It's one of the most satisfying feelings, after keeping a phrase in the back of my mind waiting for a right moment to use it, when the right occasion finally comes, and I can say to myself: "Now I got you..." ;)
Which brings me to...

@montmorency

Actually, I came to know about this series from a post on this forum, so it may as well be yours... :)
Crime stories are one of my guilty pleasures since I used to swallow down Arthur Conan Doyle's and Agatha Christie's novels as a child. Didn't get too much of them through school and college, and I guess watching crime and forensic shows today is a natural evolution. I've already seen "Forbrydelsen" and "Bron Broen" (but there I never know where the Danish stops and Swedish begins ;), and I also just started watching "Matador" which is a different genre, but it is supposed to give a good picture of history of Danish society in XX century. I'll gladly watch "Kvinden i buret" as soon as I can get my hands on it, thanks for the tip!

PS: Subtitles are really easy to find, try http://www.subtitleseeker.com/ :)


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montmorency
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 Message 10 of 16
20 August 2014 at 6:22pm | IP Logged 
I'm glad I was able to act as a kind of champion for "Den Som Dræber", if indeed it was
my post you saw. :-)

And thanks for reminding me of Matador, which I think was also mentioned on here a while
back.


Thanks for the subtitles tip. I've had mixed results from various places in the past, but
I'll give it a go.


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RadinaM
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 Message 11 of 16
20 August 2014 at 7:41pm | IP Logged 
Yeah, you can never take the subs quality for granted, but it's fun to take them apart and make them better. If you have time and inclination, of course.

Ok, I just had a bit of fun with this:

- I har hygget jer, hvad?

My take on the translation would be:

You (two) (seem to) have enjoyed yourself, eh?


My lesson for today:

hygge sig, vb.
have a good time
feel comfortable
have fun
enjoy the occasion
enjoy oneself

hvad?, interjection (udråbsord ;)
eh? didn't you? right?

same as:
ikke sandt?
not so? isn't that true?
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Iversen
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 Message 12 of 16
21 August 2014 at 2:13am | IP Logged 
The most common meaning of the interjective "hvad??" is actually 'what??' - you have got an information/seen something and can't believe your own ears or eyes, so now you ask what the .. it is. Actually, if you reacted with "what" to something in a conversation, your conversation partner might interpret it as an invitation to repeat and maybe elaborate on the crucial piece of information.

An interessant thing is than in my youth (in the sixties) people said "/va/" (with an open a) - nowadays the normal pronunciation is "vað" (with a flat a and a soft d). As an interrogative pronoun it is always pronounced with a flat a, and we only pronounce the /ð/ if we have lots of time. Mostly we just say /va/ (like French "va").

"ikke sandt?" would be 'isn't that true?' rather than 'not so?' - you always expect an affirmative answer.

Edited by Iversen on 21 August 2014 at 2:14am

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RadinaM
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 Message 13 of 16
21 August 2014 at 5:50pm | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
The most common meaning of the interjective "hvad??" is actually 'what??' - you have got an information/seen something and can't believe your own ears or eyes, so now you ask what the .. it is. Actually, if you reacted with "what" to something in a conversation, your conversation partner might interpret it as an invitation to repeat and maybe elaborate on the crucial piece of information.

Point taken about the most common meaning of "hvad?" as interjection. However, in the above sentence, the translation would be correct, ikke sandt? :)

Quote:
As an interrogative pronoun it is always pronounced with a flat a, and we only pronounce the /ð/ if we have lots of time.

Hard fact to miss: judging by the difference between what is written and what is actually pronounced, you Danes must be one of the busiest people in the world... :D

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Iversen
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 Message 14 of 16
22 August 2014 at 3:20pm | IP Logged 
The reason I call some uses of "hvad??" interjective is that you don't really except any answer, you just express your amazement. And that's what interjections are used for - expressing a sentiment in a blunt way without much grammatical embellishment. But you can still retain the interpretion of it as an interrogative pronoun, so I just wrote "interjective", I didn't flatly declare that it had become an interjection.

The translations "eh?", "didn't you?" and "right?" are not wrong, but less common. For exemple you might say "hvad" with a slightly confounded expression if you didn't quite hear something. The speaker would then mostly get the hint and repeat it. "Eh" (or more likely: "øh") could be used in the same way.

The translation "right" is different because it doesn't express surprise. And in some cases "right" would actually be the most reasonable translation, as in: "Og du troede bare du kunne komme her og sætte dig i min bedste stol, hvad?" (or some other kind of preposterous behaviour). It basically means "and now I'm stating my version of something preposterous thought I think you have, and you are just supposed to confirm my suspicion". The tone here would normally be fairly sarcastic.


I don't know whether we Danes are very busy. Maybe we are just lazy bums.

I'm also not sure whether I already have quoted the following sentence here, but in the old times Jutish people were said to be particularly parsimoneous with their language. So they could for instance say "a æ å æ ø i æ å" (jeg er på øen i åen - where 'æ' no. 2 and 3. are a prepositioned article like English "the", while no. 1 means "am"). This sentence means "I'm on the island in the river".

Edited by Iversen on 22 August 2014 at 3:29pm

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RadinaM
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 Message 15 of 16
24 August 2014 at 8:54pm | IP Logged 
@Iverson, precious insights, as usual. Got curious to hear that old Jutish, but couldn't find much. Possibly the closest I got was around minute 3:40 in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrRWg53pgqw. :)

Another phrase with udråbsord ikke from the series, but with the different question:

Du regner vel med at du skal have sagen tilbage, ikke?

I know the translation goes something on the lines of "You (for sure?) expect to...", but I couldn't find satisfying words for the regner vel med part, in none of online and offline dictionaries. In exchange I did stumble on a different, but very useful, phrase:

jeg må vel ikke tale lidt med dig?
could I speak to you for a moment?

As a cherry on the top of our previous conversation, while searching for the meaning of roddræbende kemikalier, I realized that even a Danish person may tumble over how certain words are pronounced. Read more in this blog post, very appropriately called Den som dræber ordet : http://kommakommunikation.blogspot.com.es/2011/03/den-som-dr ber-ordet.html

I will definitely be coming back to that blog, thank universe for Google Translate... ;)

Edited by RadinaM on 24 August 2014 at 8:58pm

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Iversen
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 Message 16 of 16
24 August 2014 at 10:12pm | IP Logged 
du regner vel med at få sagen tilbage = you probably count on getting the papers back


A couple of Youtube videos in Jutish dialects: Jeppe Aakjær (read by Benny Jeppesen) and his best known song "Skuld gammel Venskab Rejn Forgo (you may know the melody from "Auld lang syne").

I don't know whether the link functions outside Denmark, but there is a dialect quiz named "Sprogblomster" on Radio Midtvestjylland. The participants (from left) come from North Jutland, Western Jutland, Southern Jutland, Bornholm, Lolland and Samsø, which lies between Jutland and Zeeland. Another quiz: open the main page of the same station, choose "Net-TV" and write "Æ" in the search field ("Søg"). All participants here are from Jutland, but the quiz master speaks Standard Danish (like the quiz master) - else "ka' de der køwnhavner ikk forstå det". Howwver the judge speaks a Jutish dialect (for instance he says "en ord")

Edited by Iversen on 24 August 2014 at 10:27pm



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