Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

On Reading Easy Stuff

  Tags: Reading
 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
44 messages over 6 pages: 1 2 3 46  Next >>
Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
Joined 5111 days ago

9753 posts - 15777 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Danish, Romanian, Polish, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Slovenian, Catalan, Czech, Galician, Dutch, Swedish

 
 Message 33 of 44
09 October 2014 at 8:09pm | IP Logged 
I guess it's a case of "is the glass half-full or half-empty?" :) For me extensive reading is what takes care of the hardest parts.

It probably also depends on the personality. Some people seem to categorize everything they come across, so it makes sense if they'd rather have a proper definition asap. And the tolerance for ambiguity (or lack thereof) can also contribute, of course.
1 person has voted this message useful



Lemberg1963
Bilingual Diglot
Groupie
United States
zamishka.blogspot.coRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 2753 days ago

41 posts - 82 votes 
Speaks: English*, Ukrainian*
Studies: French, German, Spanish, Polish

 
 Message 34 of 44
10 October 2014 at 3:50am | IP Logged 
I recommend manga scanlations as the stepping stone between learner textbooks and literature. It's colloquial language so the vocabulary is both useful and easy, and there's so much of it out there that you're likely to find something that interests you. There's also contextual images for your Anki cards, which is excellent for retention.
1 person has voted this message useful



Icaria909
Senior Member
United States
Joined 4105 days ago

201 posts - 346 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Spanish

 
 Message 35 of 44
10 October 2014 at 11:09pm | IP Logged 
I really like this method. Truth be told, I have not focused on reading nearly as much as I
should. However,I must disagree with your assertion that books translated into our L2 can
serve to be valuable learning tools.

Unless the writing is very clear and straightforward, the translations into your L2 can
become very strange. I work at a book store and I was helping a friend find children's
books that can be found in both English and Spanish (they were a gift for his cousin, who
speaks only Spanish). Some of the easiest books were well translated, but the longer or
more poetic the original English book, the more bizarre the Spanish translation. I find the
choices many translators make in regards to the Harry Potter series to be equally
problematic.

I would argue we would all be better off finding easier reading materials from the cultures
using our L2. I recognize the difficulty of this for those brave souls tackling languages
with fewer resources, but whenever possible, I know I would prefer to use a book that was
originally written in my L2.
2 persons have voted this message useful



patrickwilken
Senior Member
Germany
radiant-flux.net
Joined 3047 days ago

1546 posts - 3200 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 36 of 44
11 October 2014 at 12:48am | IP Logged 
Icaria909 wrote:

I would argue we would all be better off finding easier reading materials from the cultures
using our L2. I recognize the difficulty of this for those brave souls tackling languages
with fewer resources, but whenever possible, I know I would prefer to use a book that was
originally written in my L2.


Perhaps this is something idiosyncratic for Spanish translations? I can only really judge books in my L1, but I have never had any trouble with English translations of books from Spanish, Japanese, German etc. Perhaps they lose something in the translation, but the translations read well in my L1.

I have been using a lot of translations in my L2 (German) and have asked native speakers if they read well, and they say they read just like normal German. I have nothing against reading books originally written in my L2, but I see this as a preference, not as some sort of strong rule.

So long as a translation reads well in your L2, it shouldn't matter if it a translation or a native text from a learning point of view.

Edited by patrickwilken on 11 October 2014 at 12:50am

3 persons have voted this message useful



Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
Joined 5111 days ago

9753 posts - 15777 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Danish, Romanian, Polish, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Slovenian, Catalan, Czech, Galician, Dutch, Swedish

 
 Message 37 of 44
11 October 2014 at 4:25am | IP Logged 
Twilight might be better in translation than in the original...
3 persons have voted this message useful



eyðimörk
Triglot
Senior Member
France
goo.gl/aT4FY7
Joined 2613 days ago

490 posts - 1157 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English, French
Studies: Breton, Italian

 
 Message 38 of 44
11 October 2014 at 9:35am | IP Logged 
Icaria909 wrote:
I really like this method. Truth be told, I have not focused on reading nearly as much as I should. However,I must disagree with your assertion that books translated into our L2 can serve to be valuable learning tools.

While I agree that translations can be poorly executed, and I certainly (very very very strongly) prefer to read native materials for the same reasons you mentioned, I don't think that we should completely discredit translations just because there are bad ones. In every media, there are products that are less useful for learners (e.g. subtitles that don't match the spoken word, sound recorded with an accent, language courses with old orthographies and outdated grammar, etc).

If translations worry you (like they do me), you might spend some time researching the quality of a translation before using it if you're not yet to the level where you can tell on your own. That is how I came to read Harry Potter in Breton, even going as far as reading it side-by-side with the English original in the beginning. Everyone who had written about the translation quality were raving about it, and unlike the French translation (which it is of course compared to frequently) it was supposed to be very true to the original (which you want if you're doing a side-by-side reading). As it turns out, in addition to being very close to the English (albeit not necessarily linguistically since Breton and English are rather different) it was peppered with Breton idioms. Characters didn't just drop their jaw, they "had their mouths open to nine o'clock" etc.

If you don't know if a source is decent because not all sources are, get a recommendation instead of giving up on the entire medium.
4 persons have voted this message useful



rdearman
Senior Member
United Kingdom
rdearman.orgRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3750 days ago

881 posts - 1812 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Italian, French, Mandarin

 
 Message 39 of 44
11 October 2014 at 11:42am | IP Logged 
Serpent wrote:
Twilight might be better in translation than in the original...


The only way to make that book better is to burn it.

:)
1 person has voted this message useful



Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
Joined 5111 days ago

9753 posts - 15777 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Danish, Romanian, Polish, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Slovenian, Catalan, Czech, Galician, Dutch, Swedish

 
 Message 40 of 44
11 October 2014 at 2:36pm | IP Logged 
I'm speaking purely of the language quality here. At least then it would make sense why the SC'ers didn't actually hate it.


2 persons have voted this message useful



This discussion contains 44 messages over 6 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 46  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.3594 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2020 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.