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Hi from Germany

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GreenFairy
Triglot
Newbie
Germany
Joined 2003 days ago

5 posts - 6 votes
Speaks: German*, English, DutchC1
Studies: French, Spanish, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 1 of 7
26 August 2014 at 12:39pm | IP Logged 
Hi everyone,

I'm happy that I found this forum, I already found a few inspiring topics and it's really good to motivate me even more.

I was always interested in learning languages and/or other countries and cultures.

My first foreign language was English. I studied English a few years at school and always had British & American friends to actively speak.

At school I also had to study Latin, that wasn't really a great choice for me, I never liked it...obviously I wasn't really good.

I always adored the sound of French and finally in my early twenties I was able to spend 8 weeks in Paris and taking a language class. Learning French was pretty "easy", maybe because I really enjoyed it. At the end of my time there, I was able to communicate with only French, read books, follow movies.
Unfortunately I went back to Germany and didn't stick to it and over the years I forgot nearly everything. I can understand and read most of it, but speaking is a problem. Actually I try to get back my French :)

A few years ago I had the chance to move to the Netherlands. I didn't speak one word of Dutch, but told all my co-workers there not to speak English & German to me from the first day. As German is my native language, Dutch was not difficult to learn and after the first month I was able to understand most of it and have conversations. After 3 month I was nearly fluent. Except in writing...I'm still bad at this...

I spent 4 years in the Netherlands and during that time I used English & Dutch every day. English with clients at work, Dutch with co-workers and friends. Sometimes I didn't speak, read or hear German for days and I was dreaming in all 3 languages which was a little scary.

Afrikaans was a consequence of being able to speak these 3 languages and having clients in South Africa. I am not really good at it, at least I can read and understand most of it.

Since a few weeks I started to learn Spanish by myself. I am just at the beginning, but I like it a lot.

Looking forward to my time here,
GreenFairy
1 person has voted this message useful



Josquin
Heptaglot
Senior Member
Germany
Joined 3104 days ago

2266 posts - 3992 votes 
Speaks: German*, English, French, Latin, Italian, Russian, Swedish
Studies: Japanese, Irish, Portuguese, Persian

 
 Message 2 of 7
26 August 2014 at 1:02pm | IP Logged 
Herzlich willkommen im Forum, GreenFairy! Ich bin mir sicher, dass Du hier viele interessante Diskussionen finden wirst.

Edited by Josquin on 26 August 2014 at 1:03pm

1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2967 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 3 of 7
26 August 2014 at 1:58pm | IP Logged 
Iedereen heeft moeite met Nederlands schrijven tegenwoordig. Ze veranderen de regels
continu en daarnaast hebben heel veel mensen gewoon geen zin / zijn te lui om de regels
te checken voor werkwoordsvervoegingen. Als ik een kwartje kreeg voor elke keer dat ik
een d/t fout zag was ik een heel rijk man.

En sommige dingen, dat is gewoon spreektaal of dialect :)
1 person has voted this message useful



iguanamon
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Virgin Islands
Speaks: Ladino
Joined 3522 days ago

2224 posts - 6708 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole

 
 Message 4 of 7
26 August 2014 at 2:05pm | IP Logged 
Welcome to the forum, GreenFairy. Your experience will inspire many here.
1 person has voted this message useful



GreenFairy
Triglot
Newbie
Germany
Joined 2003 days ago

5 posts - 6 votes
Speaks: German*, English, DutchC1
Studies: French, Spanish, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 5 of 7
27 August 2014 at 12:31pm | IP Logged 
Thanks to all of you! :)


@ tarvos:

Ja, dat is wel zo. Ze veranderen de regels continu...maar ik moest ook nooit schrijven...
Lezen gaat prima, spreken & begrijpen ook, en waarschijnlijk hab ik meer spreektaal geleerd. Ik weet gewoon nooit of het bij voorbeeld "d" of "dt" is en soms "maaken" of maken" :)
Maar iedereen kan me toch wel verstaan en ik vind het ook een leuke taal!


1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2967 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 6 of 7
27 August 2014 at 2:56pm | IP Logged 
D of dt is een makkelijke regel. Kijk of je er "hebben" voor kan zetten (of een vorm
daarvan). Kan dat niet, dan is het dt (mits het 2e/3e persoon is, anders is het sowieso
ik brand - ik-vorm kent geen t). Voorbeeld: het huis brandt. Kun je dat wel, dan geen t
(Ik heb mijn vingers verbrand).

De andere is een iets moeilijkere regel, maar ook logisch in principe. Meestal schrijf
je voor een lange klinker een medeklinker daarachter (maken), en voor een korte twee
medeklinkers (makken).

Het wordt ik maak omdat je een lettergreep nooit met twee dezelfde medeklinkers kan
eindigen (ik makk bestaat niet, dat moet ik mak zijn, korte klank, dus dan is het maak
als lange klank).


2 persons have voted this message useful



GreenFairy
Triglot
Newbie
Germany
Joined 2003 days ago

5 posts - 6 votes
Speaks: German*, English, DutchC1
Studies: French, Spanish, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 7 of 7
30 August 2014 at 7:02am | IP Logged 
thanks a lot tarvos!

That's a really good explanation and very useful! With this in mind, it makes it a lot easier!
I never really studied the Dutch grammar and I have absolutely no idea how I managed to pass the NT2-exam
without it :)


It's similar to English or even German, I don't know the grammar....I just know how to use it somehow. When I
studied French it was similar, of course I had to learn the grammar at the language class which was fine, but very
soon I started to not think about the grammar anymore and use the language "because it sounds right".
But- I always told my conversation partners to correct me immediately and most of them did and of course still
do.

I also started to speak and use the new language from the first day and my new challenge is learning Spanish the
same way ....we'll see. But of course I still study the grammar in Spanish.....


1 person has voted this message useful



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