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Constructed Languages

  Tags: Conlang
 Language Learning Forum : General discussion Post Reply
25 messages over 4 pages: 13 4  Next >>
Radioclare
Triglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
timeofftakeoff.com
Joined 3181 days ago

689 posts - 1119 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Esperanto
Studies: Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian

 
 Message 9 of 25
13 September 2014 at 11:10pm | IP Logged 
I know someone who learned Slovio but it didn't seem to be very successful when he tried
using it in practice. He experimented with approaching people in it (in his Slavic home
country) and his experience was that they mostly just dismissed him and thought "That
isn't a Slavic language I speak". He was a bit frustrated, because he knew they could
actually have understood him if they'd had the patience to listen properly.

I have met some people who describe themselves as being Volap√ľkists but I have not met
anyone who can spontaneously string together more than a sentence of Volap√ľk, so I remain
extremely unconvinced that it works as a language.

My boyfriend and I have a (derogatory) word to describe people like one of those in the
first thread Chung linked to - "Espervangelists"!
2 persons have voted this message useful



hrhenry
Octoglot
Senior Member
United States
languagehopper.blogs
Joined 3728 days ago

1871 posts - 3641 votes 
Speaks: English*, SpanishC2, ItalianC2, Norwegian, Catalan, Galician, Turkish, Portuguese
Studies: Polish, Indonesian, Ojibwe

 
 Message 10 of 25
14 September 2014 at 2:20am | IP Logged 
Radioclare wrote:
He was a bit frustrated, because he knew they could
actually have understood him if they'd had the patience to listen properly.

What does that even mean, either in the context of a constructed language or a natural one?

R.
==
1 person has voted this message useful



Radioclare
Triglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
timeofftakeoff.com
Joined 3181 days ago

689 posts - 1119 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Esperanto
Studies: Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian

 
 Message 11 of 25
14 September 2014 at 8:11am | IP Logged 
hrhenry wrote:
Radioclare wrote:
He was a bit frustrated, because he knew they
could
actually have understood him if they'd had the patience to listen properly.

What does that even mean, either in the context of a constructed language or a natural
one?

R.
==


I think he meant that when he spoke to people they just automatically thought "This
person isn't speaking my language, therefore I can't understand him" and walked away,
whereas presumably if they had listened to him more attentively or for a longer
period of time, they would have thought "This might not be my language but actually I
can guess what that word, that word and that word mean, because they're very similar
in my language".
3 persons have voted this message useful





jeff_lindqvist
Diglot
Moderator
SwedenRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 5507 days ago

4250 posts - 5710 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English
Studies: German, Spanish, Russian, Dutch, Mandarin, Esperanto, Irish, French
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 12 of 25
14 September 2014 at 6:01pm | IP Logged 
rdearman wrote:
I wondered if anyone on the HTLAL forums had bothered to learn a constructed language, and if so which ones people learned?/.../
Also what is your opinion of constructed languages? Do you think they serve a purpose? Are they a waste of time? Should we encourage people to make them, learn them?


Esperanto is probably the most popular conlang on HTLAL (some members are highly proficient speakers), and also the only conlang I've had a proper look at. I may have written a few negative posts over the years, but now when I've spent some time immersing myself in Irish (another language which doesn't have that many speakers you're likely to bump into randomly), I'm not the right person to criticize those who want to live and breath Esperanto. Hey, I'm even going to Berlin to take an intensive weekend course!

Any language serves a purpose if there are speakers who make use of it, just as any language can be a waste of time if you'll never use it.

Edited by jeff_lindqvist on 15 September 2014 at 10:29pm

4 persons have voted this message useful



hrhenry
Octoglot
Senior Member
United States
languagehopper.blogs
Joined 3728 days ago

1871 posts - 3641 votes 
Speaks: English*, SpanishC2, ItalianC2, Norwegian, Catalan, Galician, Turkish, Portuguese
Studies: Polish, Indonesian, Ojibwe

 
 Message 13 of 25
14 September 2014 at 6:32pm | IP Logged 
Radioclare wrote:

I think he meant that when he spoke to people they just automatically thought "This
person isn't speaking my language, therefore I can't understand him" and walked away,

I get that, I suppose, but...

Personally, if I'm going to learn a language, constructed or natural, it's with the intent of being understood and communicating with other people. The onus is on me to make myself understood.

While I suppose he learned Slovio with that in mind, there's no guarantee that any random person on the street would listen or take the time to try to listen.

At least with Esperanto, you know that you're getting a community with the language and therefore someone to speak with and be understood. I don't think you could reasonably expect someone to start speaking Esperanto in the street to a Western European and have them understand you.

R.
==

Edited by hrhenry on 14 September 2014 at 6:33pm

1 person has voted this message useful



Medulin
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Croatia
Joined 3266 days ago

1199 posts - 2192 votes 
Speaks: Croatian*, English, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Norwegian, Hindi, Nepali

 
 Message 14 of 25
14 September 2014 at 6:34pm | IP Logged 
The only constructed language I like is Nynorsk.
3 persons have voted this message useful



Xenops
Senior Member
United States
thexenops.deviantart
Joined 2423 days ago

112 posts - 158 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Spanish, Japanese

 
 Message 15 of 25
15 September 2014 at 12:39am | IP Logged 
I saw the topic of this post and I thought "must...Post".

It is because of J.R.R. Tolkien and his "fake" Elvish languages that I grew to love languages in general, both natural and artificial. I did do a few snail-mail correspondence lessons in Esperanto some years ago, but because my linguistic knowledge was limited to Spanish, I found the "exotic" grammar confusing and halted the project. Probably if I attempted again I would have better success.

I also appreciate the construction of languages to aid in the "world building" of a speculative story. While Tolkien did the reverse and created a world for his tongues, speculative stories (i.e. science fiction, fantasy) have an added richness if there is a language specific for the fantastic culture. Other attributes to well-developed "worlds" include history, economics, agriculture, geography, government, rules of magic, etc. I put "Lord of the Rings" in the language, history and geography categories, "Hunger Games" in government, economics and agriculture categories and the manga "Attack on Titan (Shingeki no Kyojin)" in government and technology. The more developed your speculative story is in this catagories, the more "plausible" they seem, and the more enjoyable. :)

While I confess I'm more interested in constructing my own language rather than learning that of someone else, I definitely applaud the endeavor.
3 persons have voted this message useful



robarb
Nonaglot
Senior Member
United States
languagenpluson
Joined 3657 days ago

361 posts - 921 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese, English*, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Swedish, Esperanto, French
Studies: Mandarin, Danish, Russian, Norwegian, Cantonese, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Greek, Latin, Nepali, Modern Hebrew

 
 Message 16 of 25
15 September 2014 at 8:29pm | IP Logged 
Conlangs are almost useless if your goal is to be able to communicate with people. While a decent number of people
know Esperanto, almost all of them also know English. The kind of people who would not speak English also don't
tend to learn Esperanto.

Esperanto is also pretty bad for talking about people on the bus. You don't want to be overheard calling someone an
"idioto" or a "kreteno."

On the other hand, you can use Esperanto to meet people on the Internet or at conventions, so it can be a decent
social hobby. It's not hard to learn if you already have a European language, and probably has some benefits for
further language learning. I found it was worthwhile to learn Esperanto simply as a way to gain insight into the
Esperanto/international auxiliary language phenomenon, especially since I didn't have to invest that much time into
it.


1 person has voted this message useful



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