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What Expug is doing in 2015 (TAC n more)

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garyb
Triglot
Senior Member
ScotlandRegistered users can see my Skype Name
Joined 3842 days ago

1468 posts - 2412 votes 
Speaks: English*, Italian, French
Studies: Spanish

 
 Message 201 of 364
17 June 2015 at 10:52am | IP Logged 
Expugnator wrote:
Today's Italian lesson was incredibly short, only 14 'verses'. They introduced some bureaucratic language like the 'ivi' adverb. As for 'il cui', is it the only way to render 'whose' in Italian, even in the spoken language? Ex. le personne il cui reddito è superiore alla media.


In my experience "di cui" is much more common and less formal, and will be more familiar from French as it works like "dont". So your sentence would be "le persone di cui il reddito è superiore alla media.", just like "les personnes dont les revenus...", "the people of whom the earnings...". I like the elegance of "il cui", and it's probably more logical to Spanish speakers, but it's less common.

There's also "del quale" etc.: "le persone delle quali il reddito", the logic is like "desquelles" in French; in most cases it's equivalent although a bit more formal. However, in the past I've been corrected for using di cui when del quale would be "more correct", but I've not really understood why. Maybe some Italians reading this could shed more light? For example I've been told that *"il gruppo di cui il concerto..." is incorrect and should be "il gruppo del quale il concerto...", but with no more explanation than that the latter sounds more right.

Along similar lines, there's "a cui", "in cui" etc. which are more common than the French-like equivalents "al quale", "nel quale", but again I'm unsure if/when only one of the options is correct.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 202 of 364
18 June 2015 at 1:10am | IP Logged 
Thank you garyb, 'di cui' sounds more familiar even with my little exposure to Italian.

In Portuguese we have 'cujo' which sounds totally bookish nowadays, to the extent that, when writing not so
formally, in the media for example in not so 'technical' articles, people rephrase sentences to avoid using
them. I'd write 'pessoas que têm renda superior à média' or 'pessoas de renda superior à média' to avoid the
'cuja' here, but at least here 'cujo' refers back to the subject. When 'cujo' refers back to the object or the
predicate it sounds even worse. "Mariazinha é a menina que teve os pais mortos num incêndio' sounds
better than '...é a menina cujos pais morreram num incêndio'. 'Cujo' sounds almost like a proper name,
almost as if we are introducing someone else in the middle of a sentence.



Yesterday I started meditation in German proper, with a near-30' video. It started encouragingly but halfway
my comprehension dropped. Well, that's an important start. Meditation speech is usually very well enunciated
and slow, making it an input source comparable only to slow news, with the difference that it covers more
daily vocabulary like commands involving eyes, hands etc.

It really helps to have a little more time. I could read Russian slower today, paying more attention to the words
and their English equivalents. Same happened with Georgian L-R from citybooks. I finally paused at nearly
every sentence and tried to learn the new words there. Now I should work more on associating sound and
meaning. It doesn't help that the reading speed is so high - even when I decrease speed it still sounds like
unnaturally fast reading that has been slowed down, not like 'natural' reading with all the inflections, pauses,
intonations etc. But that's a good sign of progress. It really is only a couple of words I don't understand at
each Georgian sentence now. Only that sometimes those are key words that prevent me from getting the
meaning of the whole sentence.

It was the fastest and easiest day of Norwegian L-R. I'm over halfway through the book, so that's why. It was
also a good day of Mandarin reading.

Still getting lots at the loops and reset and negative timecounts of Karl & Co's episodes. Today I watched
14'30" to make sure the file was over so I may assume each episode takes overal 24'. I am starting to follow
complete scenes. Maybe it's time for some update.

I don't know what happened, maybe it is related to the heat and excessive humidity, but I felt burnout as I
noticed I was half an hour in advance to my usual study rhythm. I almost ended up being delayed to the usual
intervals.

I'm glad that now I'm taking the most out of my Georgian reading. My level has improved to the extent I can
focus on the missing words while still enjoying the story. I have the feeling I could follow it even reading
extensively, because I'm familiar with the most important, action words.

Btw, Glossika has Georgian. Wonder if it's worth spending 100$ on it (which is over 300R$).

It helps to read the table of contents of a book. You become familiarized with some themes and how they are
called in your target language beforehand. Just don't pay much attention as you read because that will work
like spoilers (yeah, there can be spoilers even in non-fiction books. How many people have leafed through a
book right into the most important parts and then lost interested of reading it?). Then I started L-R German,
finally. I'm more and more convinced that L-R is the way to go from high A2 to high B2. It doesn't help much
earlier (unless we're talking about transparent languages, but then you can already assume a B2
comprehension for a transparent language, your 3rd Romance language for example) because there is so
much new that you lose focus and can't associate meaning and time. It doesn't help much later either, when
you can already read effortlessly and you can understand native audio so you don't need to spend time on
read-over speech. The A2-B2 passage is where it fits best. I am going to perform some searches for German
audiobook (any commercial ones?) over the weekend and I'm looking forward to doing it with Russian. How
about CHinese? Well, at the current stage I'd have to look at Chinese Characters, Pinyin and Translation
while listening in order to take the most out of L-R, but that wouldn't be practical, not for longer texts such as
books. I'm going to try it with podcasts like Slow Chinese, which I will start in some months. Then at some
point I'll be able to understand the Chinese sounds on-the-go, so no need for pinyin anymore. I think I'm close
to that level of being able to transcribe effortlessly - that's how I actually learn something from Singaporean
soap-operas with no pinyin of course, but I will wait a little more because I'm already learning from those
double-subtitled soap-operas anyway.

Finished the 'easy' part of the Chinese tests from Goethe-Verlag. Quoting from myself in April 28th: "From my
list of studied languages only Advanced German, Advanced Russian, Advanced Estonian and Basic and
Advanced Chinese are missing". So, Advanced German is the next call. I started the habit of writing down on
the paper schedule which day I'm doing this or that, because it helps linking it later to the specific post at my
log to notice what I wrote about the material I finished and which ones I planned to work on next. I will also try
to do more tests a day for German so I can finish it earlier, maybe 5 a day instead of the usual 3. I took a look
and they have stuff I easily recognize, so it's mostly about activating. The Chinese one was taking me a good
20 minutes every day.

So I started GLOSS! I took my first Turkmen lesson. I downloaded the files as zip just to realize they
could be played normally, no blocking. It took me ages to figure out the main text, which is the most important
feature, is hidden as a button at the top bar. I ended up letting go of GLOSS all that time because I never
understood how it was supposed to work going directly to exercises. The exercises themselves don't even
make much sense to me. Now everything is clearer. The text is pretty useful, btw. Just too much for a 1-level.
You have to be at least A2 to benefit properly from this text. So, that's what I'd do with GLOSS for a language
I'd be learning seriously, start it on the verge to delving into native materials. The site is slow but today we've
had some network problems so this also adds to that.

Btw, it's funny how I 'study' Turkmen. I pay attention to how sentences are built but I try not to focus on
individual words in terms of vocabulary, not to hinder my future progress in Turkish or Uzbek, as I don't plan
to learn Turkmen seriously now. It's worked so far.

I did a very interesting Italian lesson on learning to drive. The terms in French are very close to the
Portuguese ones: point mort/ponto-morto and embrayage/embreagem, but I think I already said this here,
maybe after an advanced French lesson.

I finished my fable! Written entirely in Norwegian, though I think I should add Google Translator as a co-writer.
I left it for correction on italki, and if I don't get corrections I
will replicate it at lang-8. I think my previous post, the challenge, was too long to be corrected by the typical
italkier, and that I'd have better luck al lang-8 where I once got a very long Georgian text corrected. Anyway,
here it is, hope you guys like it!


Den late fuglen

Det var en gang en fugl som kom alltid for sent til skolen. Mora si forsøkte å få ham til å komme i gang, enten
ved å gå å plukke frokost tidligere eller ved å kaste ham ut av reiret noen grener nedover. Det hjalp ikke. Han
skulle alltid funne en måtte å sove litt lenger eller spise og bade langsomere med hensikt.

En dag flytte han mellom trærne på vei til skolen. Klokka var halv ti, søskenene hans var allerede i skolen og
tok en eksam. Fra en middel-hengende gren kom en nifs-kledd fe som så ut som en troll. Eller var det en troll
så liten som en fe? Den lille fuglen var forbauset.

- Hallo, liten fugl. Hvorfor flyr du i så en hast?
- Jeg? Hva...hvem er du?
- Jeg kom her for å hjelpe deg. Hva skjer, gutt?
- Jeg må til skolen. Jeg har snart en eksam.
- Hvorfor haste? Kom, jeg har noe viktig å vise deg.
- Men jeg blir sent...jeg...

Plutselig var den lille fuglen midt i gamle trestammer dypt inne i skogen.

- Snu hit - sa feen.
- Hva...? Men det er bare en speil.

Feen var flau.

- Å? Vent lite. Det må slås på. Se her igjen.

Fuglen ble tatt av skjermen. Der var han og familien sin. Men han husket ikke disse scenene. - Hva? Altså,
han så gamler ut. - Hva driver du med, fae...jeg vil si, feen?

- Dette her er en portal til fremtiden. Jeg vil vise deg hva som kommer til å skje hvis du fortsetter å oppføre
deg som en lat fugl.

Fuglen så på skjermen. Der lå han i redet og gråtet at alle søskene hans fikk diplom men ikke han selv. Han
forsov og kom for sent til de avsluttende eksamene.

Scene 2 viste at han lå på gulvet mens det kom mange dyr kom med en helt ny mobiltelefon in hånden. På
den dritte scene så man at fuglen kom i en tom kirke på en bakrus.

- Fint! Jeg ser at latenskapet mitt skal førte til to tragedier i mitt liv, selv til å få meg til å glipp sjansen til å bli
den første kjøperen av en ny Eplekake telefon modell. Jeg legger merke også til at denne samme
latenskapet skal redde meg at ekteskapet. Allikevel, jeg synes det er for seriøs å gå glipp av sjansen å utføre
gode kjøper. Fra nå av skal jeg være mer forsiktig og ansvartig for å ikke forsove eller la det hende igjen.

- Gratulerer, fugl! Du har lært leksjonen godt.

Og så fra morgenen av kom kan ikke sent til avtalen lenger.

================
Now I need to continue my output rotation with other languages. I did some Chinese and Norwegian.
Georgian needs resuming, though I'm more comfortable with waiting for an episode of Kuxnya first for
reactivation. I virtually gave up on the output challenge. I should have signed up for Norwegian, but then I
don't really think I need to activate 'that much' Norwegian now because I'm seeing progress with input. The
idea with the output was for it to work as a reinforcement of the most common words and collocations for
languages where I know less vocabulary.

Not much done in terms of languages, and I did have time. Next option would be the aforementioned Kuxnya
episode but it's hard to tune in for video when I'm already working overtime. Better luck next time, it's getting
better at last.

EDIT: fixed mispasting again.

Edited by Expugnator on 18 June 2015 at 3:42am

1 person has voted this message useful



Elenia
Diglot
Senior Member
United Kingdom
lilyonlife.blog
Joined 2491 days ago

239 posts - 327 votes 
Speaks: English*, French
Studies: German, Swedish, Esperanto

 
 Message 203 of 364
18 June 2015 at 9:26pm | IP Logged 
Cute fairytale, with a 'Christmas Carol' theme. I managed to understand a fair amount of
it, which was fun. As always, good luck moving forward. Even on the days when you don't
do 'much' you are still an inspiration to me!
2 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 204 of 364
19 June 2015 at 12:16am | IP Logged 
@Elenia, thank you! I've already editted some mistakes when I posted them at lang-8, but overall I'm glad it makes some sense.

I posted the fable at lang8 but it seems corrections aren't much popular in Norwegian there either. Now I have to come up with something new to write, anyway. Let's see how the day will come along. The morning started ok, I had network issues but read in French while they were being solved, and I'm fnishing tasks at the desired time so far. I only regret being busy with browsing stuff while I was watching 'Karl & CO', I missed an opportunity to evaluate my current listening skills which seemed to be under improvement. The Georgian L-R went pretty ok. I wish there were more stories than the 6 available, that will probably account for some 40 pages.

In today's Modern Chinese a Practical Grammar I learned one way of expressing how to express possession/relationship formally, 属于 (I was already familiar with 之). It is really fascinating to understand those grammar differences between spoken and written language and to finally start to make sense out of some written texts that still sound obscure when compared to some textbook texts that are nothing but transcribed spoken language.

Maybe the fastest day at reading Georgian again. I still don't know what is keeping me away from my basic reading fluency, though. Maybe it's some typical Georgian verbs describing feelings that I haven't mastered yet, not even in terms of recognition.

I've finished reading what is supposed to be the first novel written in Papiamento, Sombra di Recuerdo, by Quito Nicolaas. This is also the last book I've bought in Curaçao and Aruba. They lasted long, as I bought them in September 2013. I'm afraid there isn't much left in terms of literature other than some translated novels for teenagers and I'm looking forward to seeing more literature appear, as I follow some FB pages. This specific novel has a rather non-linear, complex plot like some French dramas but in terms of linguistical efectiveness it is perfect for a learner (apart, maybe, from the etimological Arubian orthography instead of the elegant Curaçaoan one). The situations involve daily life, greeting relatives, going to bars, walking on the street. In short, the perfect book for learning vocabulary. I don't know about my active skills but in terms of receptive skills I'm at least C1. I keep watching a video daily and I noticed my comprehension increased yet another leap this year, similarly to what happened to French after I was already at a basic fluency. From tomorrow on, I would like to resume reading news items, though I expect to find newspapers with longer texts instead of what looks like just press notes. Funny how I had trouble with short written news in the beginning and now I watch news videos almost effortlessly. If only I could pick Papiamento as a language for writing on italki...There are native speakers, but I didn't have success contacting them.

The Portuguese translation of the German book I'm L-Ring seems to be abridged. I mean, the same arguments are developped but the paragraphs are somewhat summarized, sometimes 40% shorter. That's not bad at all, as it will force me to pay more attention to the German sentence as a whole, as it's already happening and being useful. A success. The reading speed allows me the necessary time to figure out the syntactical relationships and so to process sentences I otherwise would just glance at while thinking 'I have no idea where does it start or end, or how this relates to that'.

Wanderlust: Modern Greek, Syriac, Czech. I'm longing for a new language again. Last one was Italian in January, though Italian wasn't entirely new. Turkish and Turkmen don't count, as I'm just dabbling, not delving fully into. I want my next language to be Assimilful and duolingoful, and Modern Greek will probably qualify by then. Czech probably won't, but then I'm supposed to reach basic reading fluency in Russian prior to that.

Probably the best day of watching German. Few words looked up, enough to keep playing almost all the time. And I was answering German test from Goethe-Verlag in the meantime. I managed 5 today. Hope it lasts. These 5 take much less time than 3 Chinese ones, obviously. These tests are very important to make me familiarized with some collocations.

Russian reading was particularly easy as well. And then Futurama in German + German subtitles also had its easiest day with few word-lookups. It took me only 23 minutes to watch 21'36" minutes of video while looking words up.

I'm enjoying the lessons from GLOSS, though I still find them too advanced. I wonder if I should take them for Chinese? My idea was to do some podcast after finishing my textbooks, and with GLOSS I would add another 'textbookish' item. There are 751 Chinese lessons, at 1 lesson a day that means it will take me several years. Then 539 for Russian. This is almost like SRS, a neverending task. How do you guys parse your GLOSS lessons? Anyway, I will probably do the Uzbek when time comes, but I hope to find good textbooks as a warm-up.

So I watched @Elenia, thank you! I've already editted some mistakes when I posted them at lang-8, but overall I'm glad it makes some sense.

I posted the fable at lang8 but it seems corrections aren't much popular in Norwegian there either. Now I have to come up with something new to write, anyway. Let's see how the day will come along. The morning started ok, I had network issues but read in French while they were being solved, and I'm fnishing tasks at the desired time so far. I only regret being busy with browsing stuff while I was watching 'Karl & CO', I missed an opportunity to evaluate my current listening skills which seemed to be under improvement. The Georgian L-R went pretty ok. I wish there were more stories than the 6 available, that will probably account for some 40 pages.

In today's Modern Chinese a Practical Grammar I learned one way of expressing how to express possession/relationship formally, 属于 (I was already familiar with 之). It is really fascinating to understand those grammar differences between spoken and written language and to finally start to make sense out of some written texts that still sound obscure when compared to some textbook texts that are nothing but transcribed spoken language.

Maybe the fastest day at reading Georgian again. I still don't know what is keeping me away from my basic reading fluency, though. Maybe it's some typical Georgian verbs describing feelings that I haven't mastered yet, not even in terms of recognition.

I've finished reading what is supposed to be the first novel written in Papiamento, Sombra di Recuerdo, by Quito Nicolaas. This is also the last book I've bought in Curaçao and Aruba. They lasted long, as I bought them in September 2013. I'm afraid there isn't much left in terms of literature other than some translated novels for teenagers and I'm looking forward to seeing more literature appear, as I follow some FB pages. This specific novel has a rather non-linear, complex plot like some French dramas but in terms of linguistical efectiveness it is perfect for a learner (apart, maybe, from the etimological Arubian orthography instead of the elegant Curaçaoan one). The situations involve daily life, greeting relatives, going to bars, walking on the street. In short, the perfect book for learning vocabulary. I don't know about my active skills but in terms of receptive skills I'm at least C1. I keep watching a video daily and I noticed my comprehension increased yet another leap this year, similarly to what happened to French after I was already at a basic fluency. From tomorrow on, I would like to resume reading news items, though I expect to find newspapers with longer texts instead of what looks like just press notes. Funny how I had trouble with short written news in the beginning and now I watch news videos almost effortlessly. If only I could pick Papiamento as a language for writing on italki...There are native speakers, but I didn't have success contacting them.

The Portuguese translation of the German book I'm L-Ring seems to be abridged. I mean, the same arguments are developped but the paragraphs are somewhat summarized, sometimes 40% shorter. That's not bad at all, as it will force me to pay more attention to the German sentence as a whole, as it's already happening and being useful. A success. The reading speed allows me the necessary time to figure out the syntactical relationships and so to process sentences I otherwise would just glance at while thinking 'I have no idea where does it start or end, or how this relates to that'.

Wanderlust: Modern Greek, Syriac, Czech. I'm longing for a new language again. Last one was Italian in January, though Italian wasn't entirely new. Turkish and Turkmen don't count, as I'm just dabbling, not delving fully into. I want my next language to be Assimilful and duolingoful, and Modern Greek will probably qualify by then. Czech probably won't, but then I'm supposed to reach basic reading fluency in Russian prior to that.

Probably the best day of watching German. Few words looked up, enough to keep playing almost all the time. And I was answering German test from Goethe-Verlag in the meantime. I managed 5 today. Hope it lasts. These 5 take much less time than 3 Chinese ones, obviously. These tests are very important to make me familiarized with some collocations.

Russian reading was particularly easy as well. And then Futurama in German + German subtitles also had its easiest day with few word-lookups. It took me only 23 minutes to watch 21'36" minutes of video while looking words up.

I'm enjoying the lessons from GLOSS, though I still find them too advanced. I wonder if I should take them for Chinese? My idea was to do some podcast after finishing my textbooks, and with GLOSS I would add another 'textbookish' item. There are 751 Chinese lessons, at 1 lesson a day that means it will take me several years. Then 539 for Russian. This is almost like SRS, a neverending task. How do you guys parse your GLOSS lessons? Anyway, I will probably do the Uzbek when time comes, but I hope to find good textbooks as a warm-up.

So I watched Кухня/სამზარეულო! I'm not only happy that I finally managed to watch another episode, but I'm happy with my progress in between! It seems I can already understand dubbed Georgian pretty well to get by! And there are a lot of dubbed series out there, which means I have a lot to practice with the hope of one day understanding native series. Those dubbed series are mostly dubbed from Russian, which means I will have to try and find subtitles somewhere. Afaik, the subtitles for Кухня exist only because people at polydog did them, there usually aren't any for Russian series. But I should keep the hope - maybe I won't even need subtitles at all and will understand the Georgian on its own. That's the next step, for sure. There is a lot of recursion in contemporary series and I think, btw, that I can already understand Russian subtitles as well. The only reason I still throw the Russian subtitles at GT for the English is that it takes me longer to process the Russian and so I' have to pause-and-play all the time.

Здесь пора написать что-то по какой-то иностранный язык. Мои знания русского языка пока ничего. Я очень люблю смотреть сериалов, но еще не умею говорить по-русский. Надеюсь, что скоро смогу долго разговаривать. Сейчас много работы. Я все еще на работе. Слава Богу, что завтра пятница. Интересно, празднуют-ли также Русские пятницу?

C'est tout ce que je peux essayer d'écrire en russe en ce moment. Au moins, c'est un début. Au sujet du français, ça fait longtemps que je n'écris plus de longs textes sur lang-8. À vrai dire, je traverse une période sceptique vis-à-vis ces sites de corrections linguistiques. Mais vous me connaissez déjà bien, je continue quand même. Je ne perds jamais la foi, au moins pas en définitive.

დარწმუნებული ვარ, თუ ერთი უცხო ენა კარგად ლაპარაკი გინდა, აუცილებელია რომ ბევრჯერ ვარჯიშობ. მე თვითონ ასე არ ვქნა. მაინც არც თუ ხშირად რომ დამჭირდებოდა. ზოგჯერ არ ვიცი, რაზე დავწერო; ზოგჯერ კი ვერ წარმომიდგენია, როგორ უნდა დავწერო რამე ქართულად. მაინც და მაინც, ქართული ენა ძალიან საინტერესო და მინდა წერის გაგრძელება.
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osoymar
Tetraglot
Pro Member
United States
Joined 3371 days ago

190 posts - 344 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Portuguese, Japanese
Studies: Spanish, French
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 205 of 364
19 June 2015 at 8:12pm | IP Logged 
Quote:
À vrai dire, je traverse une période sceptique vis-à-vis ces sites de corrections
linguistiques.


Particularly when you get three different corrections with three different approaches to
correction, and you realize that two of them left major typos untouched. A dedicated
tutor would definitely be more capable of understanding your writing style and giving you
concrete feedback, but to quote a furniture ad from my youth, "free is a very good
price."
1 person has voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 206 of 364
19 June 2015 at 11:28pm | IP Logged 
@osoymar, it's not even just a matter of money or not. Working on a tutor for a specific language would mean spending too much time on that specific language, which I don't really have in mind because I don't have specific plans for any of my languages. I'm not going to live in-country and I'm not planning on using any for professional purposes, so I'm not in the urge for refining writing skills above the other ones.

Today's Estonian lesson was about calling for a plumber. It started a bit confusing but then I knew, like, 90% of the dialogue. Maybe it's time for some native material. Even 1 page a day might be beneficial. I don't mind spending some euros on an Estonian ebook translation of a book I'd be crazy about reading.

I started reading news in Papiamentu, now that the novel is over. I tried the newspaper 'Extra' but it requires paid subscription for each full text. So I tried 'La Prensa'. The news are still too short for entering into a 'flow', but that will do for a while. There's also 'Vigilante Korsou' which now seems to have longer stories than the previous ones. It is good practice, and it is remarkable how easier it become compared two 2013-14.

I'm really enjoying L-Ring German. Most of my comprehension problems in German can be solved with spending time enough on each phrase to reflect on its word order. It's hard to do that while you are reading silently. Listening to the audiobook gives you the time and puts you on the mood to do that. So far most of the times I've been able to read the German and look up the Portuguese whehn in doubt without having to pause and thus keeping the listening flow.

I watched Kuxnya again. This time I got more annoyed by the meaningless sentences I got from Google Translator. Maybe I should start pausing for those and going for the Russian, word by word. Even though I had more time than usual, I decided not to go for any output because I got some burnout, which is probably related to my mind adjusting to doing the same usual tasks about one hour earlier, which means I will have already absorbed much more information earlier than I've bee used to the previous weeks. I got the Georgian paragraph I wrote yesterday corrected, and it showed I'm on the right track.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Expugnator
Hexaglot
Senior Member
Brazil
Joined 3801 days ago

3335 posts - 4349 votes 
Speaks: Portuguese*, Norwegian, French, English, Italian, Papiamento
Studies: Mandarin, Georgian, Russian

 
 Message 207 of 364
23 June 2015 at 12:35am | IP Logged 
Once again there's a lot to say about the weekend. I should have posted yesterday whn I had plenty of time.

On Saturday, I went to the first local polyglot meeting organized at Jimmy Mello's school (the previous ones, which I couldn't attend, were on public places). It was a quick meeting and I wouldn't miss my samba class. So I arrived there on time (2 pm) and stayed until 3:15 pm where more people arrived. So I didn't have much time to speak other languages but I spoke English, Spanish, Esperanto, Papiamento and Italian. I believe I was the one with most languages there, as people got really impressed.

Due to the meeting I didn't watch a lot of German on Saturday, only one episode of Pastewka. I think 4 hours a weekend is too much of a stretch. I had the time, chronologically, for that, on Sunday, but I watched so many different series for over 3 hours and some 20 minutes, that I don't think I needed to watch more in order to benefit from it. I watched Tatortreiniger, the highly-acclaimed comedy series. I liked it. I also resumed watching 'Defiance' and 'Suits' and I noticed some progress, even though there would be a lot to explore had I gone for intensive watching. I also watched one cartoon from Adventure Time. I think it was enough practice for the weekend. I didn't manage to watch any Norwegian because I was already tired of so much German. I think the ones I wanted to watch from NRK don't have subtitles, anyway, so it's no difference from what I'm already watching during the week (Karl & Co). But then on the Russian side I read 8 pages on Saturday and 9 on Sunday. That's my highest number for a weekend ever. I reached the half of the book, finally. I read everything in Russian first and then Portuguese. I am slowly starting to get the hang of the story, though at one point I couldn't tell if one of the main characters had died or not at the end of part I.So, my Russian still leaves a lot to desire.

In terms of material gathering, I'm happy to anounce I don't foresee any problems with gathering German audiobooks in the future, though not necessarily the ones I'd like to read/listen to. Is anyone familiar with Andreas Eschbach? daegga? Not the least with Russian - I got Douglas Adams' books and I'm looking forward to finishing the 'Divergent' trilogy so I can L-read the former. I forgot to search for Georgian audiobooks, but after a quick search I found Nodar Dumbadze (which is available in Russian too as a support text I can paste at GT), Paulo Coelho (the original is in my native language), Gabriel García Marquez and some Georgian classics which I'd have more trouble with. Now I need to know if those audiobooks are sent though email or just downloaded. Oh, I also got the first episode of GoT dubbed in French. The episodes are going to be released dubbed rather later, so I have to keep calm and "enjoy" the spoilers people give all the time at work.

I decided to give up on 'Happy Journey Across China'. I still can't watch it through CCTV site, and the ones I'm due to watch are missing from the Confucious site. It's bringing me so much trouble. I need another resource. I though of GLOSS but doing a GLOSS lesson early in the morning and then a Turkmen one later would be boring. I will think about what to do. Preferably double subtitles but not from Singapore and not on Youtube (because I'm already watching Singaporean dramas on Youtube later on).

Started one French film with subtitles, called L'Étudiante. That will give me some rest.

It doesn't hurt to discuss some Papiamento sentences here. This one is interesting:

Wishi, Marchena, Santa Helena, Veeris i besindario lo ta di dos barionan kaminda lo introdusí e konsepto nobo i moderno aki.

The word 'kaminda' might from 'caminho/camino' = the way you take, path, but it's used as a relative pronoun, meaning 'where'.The same happens with 'manera' = the way you do things, which is used as . The particle 'lo' marks the future.

The Curaçaoan newspapers have different sorts of news, some dealing more with daily life, such as the one I read today, about new mailboxes for the people who lived in the neighborhoods cited. This way one can learn a wide range of vocabulary, more than the typical 'news vocabulary' you get from larger press units in other languages.

It was a stressful day with some problems, meetings and so I lost the concentration to keep studying and got delayed a lot plus a mild headache (I almost never have a headache). So I went only until Bednaya Nastya. No reading Russian, no GLOSS Turkmen, no Italian, no Futurama, no output. Tomorrow is supposed to be a bit calmer. Maybe a couple of minutes at home will allow me to finish some tasks.
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daegga
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Austria
lang-8.com/553301
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1076 posts - 1789 votes 
Speaks: German*, EnglishC2, Swedish, Norwegian
Studies: Danish, French, Finnish, Icelandic

 
 Message 208 of 364
23 June 2015 at 2:19am | IP Logged 
Quote:
Andreas Eschbach? daegga?


Nope, too modern for me, I haven't read German books in years ;) (ok, that's not true,
but I only read out of copyright stuff in German).

But there is a film version of "Das Jesus Video". It's German and modern, so it's awful
of course (I can't remember any details).

But speaking of reading books in German ... check out the translated (from English,
written by a Swede) book "Das Buch von San Michele" (The Story of San Michele) by Axel
Munthe. One of the few books I enjoyed reading in German.

Edited by daegga on 23 June 2015 at 2:25am



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