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monox D. I-Fly’s Arabic and Japanese Log

  Tags: Arabic | Japanese
 Language Learning Forum : Language Learning Log Post Reply
151 messages over 19 pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 1 ... 18 19 Next >>
Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 2601 days ago

476 posts - 71 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 1 of 151
14 March 2015 at 2:50pm | IP Logged 
Make a log so that I can join the Rare Language Team. In that team I want to focus on Arabic because I have learnt about that when I was an elementary students. However, only a very few things I can remember:
1. The scripts. I can still read them but still got confused about distinguishing when to stop, when to continue, etc.
2. Subject Pronouns. It was sung in the religious school I was studying in: Huwa Humaa Hum. Hiya Humaa Hunna. Anta Antumaa Antum. Anti Antumaa Antunna. Anaa Nahnu.
3. Basic Verbs according Subject Pronouns. It was also sung in the religious school I was studying in: Fa'ala Fa'alaa Fa'aluu. Fa'alat Fa'alataa Fa'alna. Fa'alta Fa'altumaa Fa'altum. Fa'alti Fa'altumaa Fa'altunna. Fa'altu Fa'alnaa.
4. Several basic nouns and verbs.
5. Name of the days.
6. Name of numbers (up to seven, because name of the days are taken after them).
7. Some question words (Man, Maa, Kaifa).
8. Some conjunctions (Wa, Min, Bi).

Targets:
1. To be able to understand some full sentence.
2. To understand the pattern of diversed vowels from the same three consonants and what they mean.
3. To know how to read Arabic without vowels (I was taught that, but forget completely).
4. To know how to determine what vowel must be used in a word.

My progress with Japanese will also be added here.
I have been learning Japanese autodidactly since I was a 4th grader (about 15 years ago) and can only read Katakana, about half of Hiragana, very few Kanji, and understand several hundreds (?) meaning of words. Still don't know how to translate a full sentence without guessing first.
I was interested in Japanese because I love watching Digimon shows. Almost everytime a new Digimon appears, there are some data written in Japan regarding its names, type, and attacks. I wrote down all the names, memorized them, and tried to decipher what each character means. All of the names are written in Katakana, that's why I can read and write all Katakana before even learning Hiragana.

Edited by Monox D. I-Fly on 15 March 2015 at 5:47pm



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 2601 days ago

476 posts - 71 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 2 of 151
21 March 2015 at 2:29am | IP Logged 
Initially I planned to post here once a month or each time I complete one personal tasks. However, I asked some questions in the "Question About Target Language" boards and got some links there. In order to keep those links from being sunk away, I posted those threads containing the links here:
Arabic
Japanese



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 2601 days ago

476 posts - 71 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 3 of 151
31 March 2015 at 9:38am | IP Logged 
My mother gave me a task to write the Latin script of Arabic text in her dua book. Because there it has Indonesian translation, I took this chance to try to learn new vocabs. Some new vocabs I got:
Syarri = Evil
Kasala = Laziness (I remember this one because "kasala" sounds similar to "kesel", which in Javanese means "tired". Being tired makes us lazy, doesn't it?)
Waswas = Whisper (Both start with W so it's easy to remember)



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 2601 days ago

476 posts - 71 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 4 of 151
10 April 2015 at 1:48am | IP Logged 
Once a month, in my office we get an Islamic magazine as a compensation for 15,000 IDR monthly charity. In the most middle part of the magazine there's an Arabic sect and I always take notes of them. Here are some of them as well as how I remember:

Ka-sun = Trophy
"Ka-sun" sounds similar to "Katsu" (Japanese for "Win"). Trophy is given to the winner.

Khidzaa'un = Soccer shoes
"Khidzaa'" sounds similar to "Idak" (Javanese for "Step on"). Imagine being stepped on by a pair of soccer shoes.

Shofaarotun = Whistle
Shofaarotun -> Shofaaroh -> Shvaro -> Suworo (Javanese for "Sound"). Whistles produce sound.

Right now I am taking a freelance job given by my co-worker to edit a students' worksheet book of Koran and Hadith subject. Of course there are some Arabic lessons inside. Hope that they will increase my vocabularies as well as improving my grammar knowledge.



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 2601 days ago

476 posts - 71 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 5 of 151
10 May 2015 at 12:22pm | IP Logged 
It has been a monthe since the last time I posted here. There wasn't much improvement in my part, only a few new vocabs from my freelance job. Now I am scheduling my language learning into 5 languages based on Javanese days. My schedule is as follow.

Legi: Indonesian (My own native language. As a book editor, I realize that there are still much to learn)
Pahing: Javanese (My own regional language so that I won't forget about it)
Pon: English (My grammar as well as my diction still have many mistakes)
Wage: Arabic (I am a Moslem and have been learning this language ever since I was a kid)
Kliwon: Japanese (I like anime and have been learning this language ever since I was a kid)



Woodsei
Bilingual Diglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
United States
justpaste.it/Woodsei
Joined 2263 days ago

614 posts - 166 votes 
Speaks: English*, Arabic (Egyptian)*
Studies: Russian, Japanese, Hungarian

 
 Message 6 of 151
11 May 2015 at 3:04am | IP Logged 
Hi Monox D. I-Fly,

Glad to see you're still at it.

Regarding Arabic:
Stopping, and going on, are just like in English, with commas and periods. You give a
short pause at the comma, and a definitive stop at the period. If you have access to
any audio that has text, try to spend some time listening to it, and eventually you'll
get a feel for how the general pronunciation, and the prosody (or melody) of the
language, how to read it, etc.

I hope you don't mind, but I wanted to point out a few points regarding your notes for
Arabic terms.

1. Ka-sun vs. Katsu:

Katsu has a short, clipped "a" sound, while with Ka-sun, it's a longer, drawn out Kaa.
It's also less like "uh" and more like "aaah." So, more along the lines of Kaa-sun.
Also it could be Kaa-sun, kaa-sin, and kaa-san, depending on it's grammatical position
in the sentence, but I don't want to confuse you. The neutral for the word, when it's
not grammatically modified, and also when it's used in colloquial spoken language, is
Kaas.

I liked that you tried to connect the Arabic imagery to the Japanese one, nice :) I do
that a lot unconsciously, too, across the languages that I speak and learn.

2. Shoufaaroton= Whistle

It's more like, soffaaraton. Starts with an "s" sound, not "sh," short "o" sound,
stress on the "f" sound. Again, the "ton/tin/tan" is dependent on grammatical
placement,
and the neutral is "soffaarah."

Hope that helped. Let me know if you need any help with Arabic, or English, and of
course, make sure to drop in at the Japanese team thread if you need anything. We miss
you there!

EDIT: I totally left out the fact that MSA has ka-sun (short "a", with an abrupt end)
as opposed to the colloquial long "a," so yes, in a sense, it does sound similar to
Katsu. You were spot on there. Apologies for the confusion. Ganbare!

Edited by Woodsei on 11 May 2015 at 6:22am

1 person has voted this message useful



Monox D. I-Fly
Senior Member
Indonesia
monoxdifly.iopc.us
Joined 2601 days ago

476 posts - 71 votes 
Speaks: Indonesian*

 
 Message 7 of 151
11 May 2015 at 6:07am | IP Logged 
Well, I said that the sounds were similar, not identical. Thank you for your concern, though. It does totally help. And it's okay to confuse me, in fact I am curious about when Kaa-sin or Kaa-san is used.

Arabic note:
Last night I read that in Arabic language, sun is feminine and moon is masculine, the opposite of other languages I knew. Now I am imagining a female version of Apollo and a male version of Diana.

Japanese note:
Learned more about nakeyoshi and ikeyoshi. The girl I talked about in another thread told me that the translation of "You are nice and beautiful girl" is "Anata wa yasashikute kirei na onna da". Now, is "You are beautiful and nice girl" "Anata wa kirei de yasashii onna da"?



Woodsei
Bilingual Diglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
United States
justpaste.it/Woodsei
Joined 2263 days ago

614 posts - 166 votes 
Speaks: English*, Arabic (Egyptian)*
Studies: Russian, Japanese, Hungarian

 
 Message 8 of 151
11 May 2015 at 6:40am | IP Logged 
Monox D. I-Fly wrote:
The girl I talked about in another thread told me that the
translation of "You are nice and beautiful girl" is "Anata wa yasashikute kirei na onna
da". Now, is "You are beautiful and nice girl" "Anata wa kirei de yasashii onna da"?


Yes.


1 person has voted this message useful



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