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Decline in Native Language?

  Tags: Native Language
 Language Learning Forum : General discussion Post Reply
23 messages over 3 pages: 13  Next >>


Iversen
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 Message 9 of 23
15 June 2015 at 9:53am | IP Logged 
I wonder whether those who report problems in their native language experience those problem when they try to say things in it which they know perfectly well to say in some other language - but their own language expresses those things in a different way, for instance because it lacks some crucial term.
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Via Diva
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 Message 10 of 23
15 June 2015 at 10:01am | IP Logged 
Iversen, or you just get used to express something in another language and when you have to say it in your native one you get confused.
Tell me about it...
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Ogrim
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 Message 11 of 23
15 June 2015 at 10:31am | IP Logged 
I've been living abroad for the last 20 years and in all those years, I have been using English, Spanish and French much more than my native language. However, I would not say that I have noticed a "decline", my Norwegian is still "fluent" and fully functional. However, when I visit Norway I do notice that I am out of date. There are idiomatic expressions, words and phrases that have come into the language over the years which I've missed out on because I wasn't in the country, and I hardly ever see Norwegian TV, and spend less and less time on Norwegian news websites due to their poor quality (as I see it). On the other hand, I use certain words and forms that sound old-fashioned to my younger relatives.

It does happen very occasionally that I hesitate for a second or two as to the right way of expressing something, e.g. what preposition to use in a given context. However, when I see how some of my friends and relatives write on social media, I think I still write a better and more correct Norwegian than most of them. Sorry if that sounds pretentious, but ever since I learned how to read and write I have been very conscious of writing correctly. Today it seems a lot of people really don't care,
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Arthaey
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 Message 12 of 23
15 June 2015 at 5:26pm | IP Logged 
Ogrim wrote:
I've been living abroad for the last 20 years ... I use certain words and forms that sound old-fashioned to my younger relatives.


Do you think this is even more than what naturally happens simply by being 20 years older than "kids these days"? Older folks always sound a little old-fashioned to their younger relatives, even without adding additional languages or living abroad to the mix, right? :)
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kanewai
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 Message 13 of 23
15 June 2015 at 9:43pm | IP Logged 
I've lived in non-English environments twice, once for 2 years and once for six months.
I don't think my English actually declined, but there were times when it took a few
minutes (and sometimes a few days) to switch back to speaking fluently. It's a strange
feeling, yeah?

The worst moment I had was when I was back in the States trying to order a bagel. The
girl at the counter asked me how I wanted it prepared, and I choked. I couldn't think
of any of the words for what you might do to a bagel, and all I did was stare at her
blankly.
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chaotic_thought
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 Message 14 of 23
15 June 2015 at 10:49pm | IP Logged 
kanewai wrote:
The worst moment I had was when I was back in the States trying to order a bagel. The
girl at the counter asked me how I wanted it prepared, and I choked. I couldn't think
of any of the words for what you might do to a bagel, and all I did was stare at her
blankly.


I'll take the bagel sunny-side-up. Seriously, what words are normally used to describe how a bagel is prepared??

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1e4e6
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 Message 15 of 23
15 June 2015 at 11:24pm | IP Logged 
When I was at a sandwich place in Manchester, I asked for jalapeños, and for some
reason that got me all into Spanish mode. You have to go along the queue quite wuickly
and announce your preferred ingredientes for your sandwich. Given that I was already
thinking in Spanish back then, I started saying jalapeños, lechuga, bistéc, tomate,
olivos, until I realised that I must have looked like a crazy fool because the other
customers started staring at me.

Edited by 1e4e6 on 15 June 2015 at 11:45pm

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kanewai
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 Message 16 of 23
16 June 2015 at 1:06am | IP Logged 
chaotic_thought wrote:
I'll take the bagel sunny-side-up. Seriously, what words are
normally used to describe how a bagel is prepared??


Buttered. Toasted. With cream cheese. Basic things, really, but all I could think was
"I just want a bagel."


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