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berabero89
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 2805 days ago

101 posts - 137 votes 
Speaks: English, Amharic*
Studies: Spanish, Japanese, French

 
 Message 1 of 14
14 August 2015 at 7:53am | IP Logged 
I've recently began to study Old English. I saw that Dr. Arguelles had recommended
Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Primer, but I didn't realize it was a grammar and not really a
course. Currently, I have the Cambridge Old English Reader, Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Reader,
and the primer. My question is: do I have enough to learn the language? I am attempting
to learn the conjugation and declension paradigms, but it's not working very well. It
seems like my only other option is to jump into the Cambridge reader, but without
grammatical explanations, it seems like I'll have huge gaps in my knowledge.

Are there free, comprehensive courses that others here know of? Any advice?

Thank you
1 person has voted this message useful





Iversen
Super Polyglot
Moderator
Denmark
berejst.dk
Joined 4866 days ago

9078 posts - 16470 votes 
Speaks: Danish*, French, English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Swedish, Esperanto, Romanian, Catalan
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 Message 2 of 14
14 August 2015 at 11:41am | IP Logged 
There are a few videos on the internet, like the battle of Brunenberg (or something like that). Not much, but probably just enough to get the 'tone' ringing in your ears. And apart from that I have found the Anglosaxon chronicles much easier to deal with than Beowulf. Boring, but comprehensible..

Edited by Iversen on 14 August 2015 at 11:42am

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Elexi
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 3728 days ago

937 posts - 1835 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: French, German, Latin

 
 Message 3 of 14
14 August 2015 at 11:44am | IP Logged 
This is where Arguelles' recommendations can sometimes be slightly unhelpful.
Unlike lesser mortals he can learn from a primer (which in British English, at least,
often means a grammar to be used with a teacher - e.g. Kennedy's Latin Primer). Most
of us cannot achieve such a feat :-)

When I had a foray into OE, I used Pollington to get going, with Sweet as a reference.
I found it a useful introducion.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/First-Steps-Old-English-Language/dp/ 1898281386/ref=sr_1_1?
ie=UTF8&qid=1439544684&sr=8-1&keywords=Old+English

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Old-English-Poems-Prose-Lessons/dp/1
898281467/ref=pd_sim_14_2?
ie=UTF8&refRID=1SCY5MSPJHSYFHAPNXV3


Edited by Elexi on 14 August 2015 at 11:47am

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akkadboy
Triglot
Senior Member
France
Joined 3571 days ago

264 posts - 497 votes 
Speaks: French*, English, Yiddish
Studies: Latin, Ancient Egyptian, Welsh

 
 Message 4 of 14
14 August 2015 at 12:44pm | IP Logged 
I seem to recall that there's a Teach Yourself Old English (actually there might be two, one from the 60's maybe, and a more recent one).
1 person has voted this message useful



Elexi
Senior Member
United Kingdom
Joined 3728 days ago

937 posts - 1835 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: French, German, Latin

 
 Message 5 of 14
14 August 2015 at 12:45pm | IP Logged 
I have the new one TY (impulse buy, never used it) and it looks quite good and getting a
person started in OE.
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Mork the Fiddle
Senior Member
United States
Joined 2132 days ago

86 posts - 158 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Norwegian, Latin, Ancient Greek

 
 Message 6 of 14
14 August 2015 at 8:12pm | IP Logged 
As a grammar and an introduction, I used Peter Baker's Introduction to Old English, which I found serviceable. There is a free online version of the book Introduction to Old English, but which I have not used myself. Peter Baker created a Magic Sheet, which is a one-page, color-coded summary of declensions and conjugations. I found it quite helpful, and you might find it useful for learning the paradigms, too.

Murray McGillivray of The University of Calgary also has an online Introductory Course, which is another resource I discovered only too late.

I took a look or two at Beowulf, but chose to work on the shorter lyrical poems first: "The Wanderer," "Deor" and so on, and to read some of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as Iversen suggests above. There is a parallel text version of Beowulf by Benjamin Slade. Useful, just beware Slade has copyrighted his site.

For what it is worth, I have more than a dozen bookmarks to sites about Old English on the web from a dozen or more years ago, but almost all of the links are now dead.
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Iversen
Super Polyglot
Moderator
Denmark
berejst.dk
Joined 4866 days ago

9078 posts - 16470 votes 
Speaks: Danish*, French, English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Swedish, Esperanto, Romanian, Catalan
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 Message 7 of 14
16 August 2015 at 5:51pm | IP Logged 
I actually have the old TY by Leslie Blakeley from 1964 in a reprint from 78, and it is a sleek little thing with just 193 pages, but it covers a lot of ground and also contain some good prose texts with translations. But I suppose it would be hard to find in the shops these days..
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Mork the Fiddle
Senior Member
United States
Joined 2132 days ago

86 posts - 158 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Norwegian, Latin, Ancient Greek

 
 Message 8 of 14
16 August 2015 at 7:22pm | IP Logged 
Iversen wrote:
I actually have the old TY by Leslie Blakeley from 1964 in a reprint from 78, and it is a sleek little thing with just 193 pages, but it covers a lot of ground and also contain some good prose texts with translations. But I suppose it would be hard to find in the shops these days..
I must say that in a lifetime of haunting used book stores, I have never run across anything about Old English, except of course Beowulf in one guise or another. Nowadays I would check with abebooks, where I have frequent luck.


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