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Finnish: höllä

 Language Learning Forum : Skandinavisk & Nordisk Post Reply
AtgZ
Diglot
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Russian Federation
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Speaks: Russian*, English
Studies: German, Finnish, Hungarian, Tatar

 
 Message 1 of 8
21 September 2015 at 7:58pm | IP Logged 
I'm trying to figure the difference between löysä, löyhä and höllä. Could you guys
please help me?
Can you say

Höllä solmu
höllä kitaran kieli
höllästi kiinnitetty naula
höllä oven sarana
höllät vaatteet
höllä hammas
höllästi kiinni heinäsuopa?

Where does this word fit?
If it's possible to use this word but you have to use an adverb instead of an
adjective, this also counts as possible
Kiitoksia!



Serpent
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 Message 2 of 8
26 September 2015 at 10:51pm | IP Logged 
I've never heard höllä tbh. I generally use löysä in these contexts, often löysänä/löysällä.

höllästi kiinni(tetty) seems awkward to me, but who knows...

It seems like you worry too much about individual words and their equivalents.



utu
Diglot
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 Message 3 of 8
16 October 2015 at 6:02pm | IP Logged 
I guess the word höllä might be a bit dialectal. Myself, I would use it more as a verb (höllätä) and an adverb (höllästi) rather than as an adjectif, but almost all of the examples you listed sound just fine for me. Only "höllät vaatteet" sounds strange (löysät is correct), and I'm not quite sure what you mean by "höllästi kiinni heinäsuopa". Instead of höllä hammas I would also say "höllästi kiinni oleva hammas", e.g. Hammas on vain höllästi kiinni. But then again, I think both "höllä korkki" and "höllästi kiinni oleva korkki" are okay.

The difference between höllä and löyhä/löysä is very subtle, sometimes even non-existent. It depends of the context too, löyhä/löysä is more suitable for various cases but you can replace them with höllä quite often - especially as a verb it's very safe to use.

And I have to add that I'm also often interested in the small differences between some words in other languages, as well as in Finnish, though it might seem quite irrelevant to others.
2 persons have voted this message useful



Serpent
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 Message 4 of 8
17 October 2015 at 1:50am | IP Logged 
Thanks for the reply! I also care about the minor differences, especially in Finnish :D
Is höllä associated with any specific area?

The hay stack thing makes sense in my mind, although I'm not sure how I'd say it in Russian :D But basically in Russia hay stacks are culturally an important concept, and it's a common association with rural summer fun (for example using it as a hiding space, alone or with someone). It doesn't seem like you can change the wording of höllästi kiinni heinäsuova in a way that would make it immediately clear.



utu
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 Message 5 of 8
18 November 2015 at 11:35am | IP Logged 
I can't really name any specific area, but another word associated to this one came to mind: hölläkätinen which means permissive in English. This lead me thinking that perhaps höllä is slightly more positive than löysä in some contexts, or rather the verb höllätä compared to löysätä.

About the haystack: in theory, you can say höllästi kiinni oleva heinäsuova or höllä heinäsuova, but I can't really picture in my mind what that would be. Do you mean a haystack that is kind of loosen, not very thick?

Sorry that it took me so long to answer!





Hencke
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 Message 6 of 8
15 June 2016 at 3:10pm | IP Logged 
Something else that was not mentioned here yet afaics: To my mind "höllä" is a lot more informal than the alternatives. I'm not sure if it can be considered dialectal or slang as well, but something in that direction. You also don't come across it as often as the other words. I can't think of any recent occasion at all, except in the song:

... sano vaan jos hidastaa sä tahdot niin höllään kaasujalkaa meil on aamuun asti aikaa mä ajoin koko yön niin kuin roy orbison ...
1 person has voted this message useful



Rhian
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 Message 7 of 8
15 June 2016 at 5:14pm | IP Logged 
Just a reminder to everyone that the majority of
members have moved to www.forum.language-
learners.org after software problems here. You are
welcome to post here or there or on both but note
that you need to register on the new site (ie your
HTLAL name and password won't work there). Don't
worry - sign up is much simpler over on LLOrg!



Serpent
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serpent-849.livejour
Joined 4037 days ago

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 Message 8 of 8
18 June 2016 at 11:34pm | IP Logged 
Yep, I invited Hencke to the new forum in summer and he joined :)
utu wrote:
I can't really name any specific area, but another word associated to this one came to mind: hölläkätinen which means permissive in English. This lead me thinking that perhaps höllä is slightly more positive than löysä in some contexts, or rather the verb höllätä compared to löysätä.

About the haystack: in theory, you can say höllästi kiinni oleva heinäsuova or höllä heinäsuova, but I can't really picture in my mind what that would be. Do you mean a haystack that is kind of loosen, not very thick?

Sorry that it took me so long to answer!
Well, maybe a more messy one. I don't even really know what the OP meant in Russian, though. But then I've never played in a haystack so who knows...

Yeah it sounds dialectal to me too, but is it associated with any region?



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