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Modern Greek Resources

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Speakeasy
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 2565 days ago

502 posts - 1090 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 1 of 5
05 May 2020 at 11:56pm | IP Logged 
FOR REPOSTING TO THE “A LANGUAGE LEARNERS’ FORUM” (LLORG)
During the period from February 2020 through May 2020, I conducted a complete revision to the twenty-eight (28) lists of resources which I had posted on the LLORG during the previous three-year period. As revising these types of documents directly on the LLORG in the “Edit Mode” is fraught with difficulties, I removed their contents from the LLORG, stored them on my computer, and completed the revisions. During the revision process an event occurred which prevented me from reposting the contents to their original files and, as a contingency measure, I have posted them here on the HTLAL in the anticipation that either the Administrator or the Moderators of the LLORG will copy/paste them to the LLORG. - Speakeasy

1. INTRODUCTION

Greece
Greece, officially the Hellenic Republic, historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approximately 10.7 million as of 2018. Athens, the nation's capital, is its largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, Greece shares land borders with Albania to the northwest, North Macedonia and Bulgaria to the north, and Turkey to the northeast. The Aegean Sea lies to the east of the mainland, the Ionian Sea to the west, the Cretan Sea and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Greece has the longest coastline on the Mediterranean Basin and the 11th longest coastline in the world at 13,676 km in length, featuring many islands, of which 227 are inhabited. Eighty percent of Greece is mountainous, with Mount Olympus being the highest peak at 2,918 metres. The country consists of nine traditional geographic regions: Macedonia, Central Greece, the Peloponnese, Thessaly, Epirus, the Aegean Islands (including the Dodecanese and Cyclades), Thrace, Crete, and the Ionian Islands. – Source: Wikipedia

Languages of Greece
Standard Modern Greek, a derivative of Demotic Greek, is the only official language of the Hellenic Republic; it is spoken by some 99.5% of the population (though not necessarily as a first language). Several non-official dialects and distinct Hellenic languages are spoken, including (but not restricted to) the following: Cappadocian, Cypriot, Italiot, Maniot, Mariupolitan, Pharasiot, Pontic, Sarakatsanika, Silliot, Tsakonian, and Yevanic. Several minority languages are spoken, including: Albanian, Armenian, Georgian, Ladino, Romany, Russian, and Turkish. The most frequently-encountered non-regional languages are: English, French, German, and Italian. – Source: Wikipedia

Greek Language
Greek is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece, Cyprus, Albania and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea. It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning at least 3,500 years of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary, were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin, Cyrillic, Armenian, Coptic, Gothic, and many other writing systems. – Source: Wikipedia

Modern Greek Language
Modern Greek, generally referred to by speakers simply as Greek, refers collectively to the dialects of the Greek language spoken in the modern era, including the official standardized form of the languages sometimes referred to as Standard Modern Greek. The end of the Medieval Greek period and the beginning of Modern Greek is often symbolically assigned to the fall of the Byzantine Empire in 1453, even though that date marks no clear linguistic boundary and many characteristic features of the modern language arose centuries earlier, beginning around the fourth century AD. During most of the Modern Greek period, the language existed in a situation of diglossia, with regional spoken dialects existing side by side with learned, more archaic written forms, as with the vernacular and learned varieties (Dimotiki and Katharevousa) that co-existed in Greece throughout much of the 19th and 20th centuries. – Source: Wikipedia

Varieties of Modern Greek
The linguistic varieties of Modern Greek can be classified along two principal dimensions. First, there is a long tradition of sociolectal variation between the natural, popular spoken language on the one hand and archaizing, learned written forms on the other. Second, there is regional variation between dialects. The competition between the popular and the learned registers (see Diglossia), culminated in the struggle between Dimotiki (Demotic Greek) and Katharevousa during the 19th and 20th centuries. As for regional dialects, variation within the bulk of dialects of present-day Greece is not particularly strong, except for a number of outlying, highly divergent dialects spoken by isolated communities. Outlying varieties include: Tsakonian, Pontic Greek, Cappadocian Greek, Pharasiot Greek, Silliot Greek, Italiot Greek, Mariupolitan, Istanbul Greek, and many others. – Source: Wikipedia

Katharevousa
Katharevousa is a conservative form of the Modern Greek language conceived in the late 18th century as a compromise between Ancient Greek and the Demotic Greek of the time. Originally, it was widely used for both literary and official purposes, though seldom in daily language. In the 20th century, it was increasingly adopted for official and formal purposes, until minister of education Georgios Rallis made Demotic Greek the official language of Greece in 1976, and in 1982 Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou abolished the polytonic system of writing for both Demotic and Katharevousa. – Source: Wikipedia

Demotic Greek
Demotic Greek, or Dimotiki, is a term used in contrast with Katharevousa to describe the colloquial vernacular form of Modern Greek which had evolved naturally from Koine Greek and was spoken by the vast majority of Greeks in Greece during the time of diglossia in the modern Greek state from the time of its founding in 1821 until the resolution of the Greek language question in 1976. In this context Dimotiki describes the specific non-standardized vernacular forms of Greek used by the vast majority of Greeks throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. During this long period of diglossia Katharevousa and Dimotiki complemented and influenced each other, as is typical of diglossic situations. Dimotiki became standardized over time and it was this standardized from of Dimotiki which in 1976 was made the official language of Greece. This standardized from of Dimotiki is today known formally as Standard Modern Greek. The term demotic Greek (with a lowercased d) is also a term used generally to refer to any variety of the Greek language which has evolved naturally from Ancient Greek and is popularly spoken. – Source: Wikipedia

Modern Greek Study Group
Modern Greek Study Group

Selected Discussions
This is but a small selection of discussion threads in which the question of Modern Greek Resources was raised.

Modern Greek Language Review     

A path for Modern Greek? – LLORG – February 2016     

When should I start Assimil Greek? – LLORG – May 2016     

Anyone learning modern Greek? – LLORG – January 2017     

Suggestions for Modern Greek - LLORG - March 2019     

Assimil’s Modern Greek Course – HTLAL – April 2011     

Audio material Greek for beginners – HTLAL – December 2014     

Modern Greek Resources – HTLAL – March 2014     
     
Modern Greek - Assimil type source – HTLAL – June 2013     

Best Programs to Learn Modern Greek – HTLAL – June 2011     

IMPROVING THIS FILE?
Please feel at liberty to post your own recommendations and/or comments and I’ll see what I can do about incorporating them into the lists above.

SUBSEQUENT COMMENTS
Visitors to this file are encouraged to review the subsequent comments, posted below, as they include members’ suggestions concerning materials and form a running commentary on resources for the study of this language.

EDITED:
Completely revised: April 2020



Speakeasy
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 2565 days ago

502 posts - 1090 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 2 of 5
05 May 2020 at 11:57pm | IP Logged 
2. MODERN GREEK RESOURCES: LEGACY
It is quite understandable that students should want the very latest, up-to-date materials for study purposes. All the same, I suggest that serious students of Modern Greek consult the “legacy” materials presented below and that they consider incorporating them into their studies. Although these resources are frequently discounted for the presence of some now-obsolescent vocabulary and for the inclusion of both Demotic Greek and Katharevousa Greek, an astute language learner should be able to benefit from their study. I am of the opinion that the members of this forum are capable of discernment and that they can be trusted to use these materials wisely.

Modern Greek Courses, Supplements, etc.

Barron's Mastering Greek (1988); Barron's Educational Series     
This was a reprint of "FSI Greek Basic, Vol.I" of 1967. Barron’s Educational did not re-typeset the text of the original typewritten FSI course manual. Instead, the publisher used a low-cost copying process which yielded non-commercial-quality results. In addition, as the Barron’s course manual was about half-the-size of the original manual, the Greek script therein was very difficult to read (see subsequent discussion "FSI Basic Greek: Typesetting", below).

Cortina Conversational Greek (1959)     
Conventional presentation of the target language through situational dialogues. For self-instruction. The course books contain a transcript of the dialogues, a phonetic transcription, and an English translation. Emphasis on the Katharevousa variety of Greek. Accompanied by seven (7) hours of AUDIO recordings.

Demotic Greek, Parts I, II (1973 - 1983)     
Workbook for Demotic Greek (1973)     
Demotic Greek: AUDIO Recordings – Indiana University CeLT Archives (access restricted)     
By Peter Bien, Dimitri Gondicas et al.; published by University Press of New England. Taking into consideration the period when this course was introduced, the volume of the printed materials and the 21 AUDIO cassettes, it is highly likely that the audio-lingual method was used.

DLI Greek Basic (1963-1966) – Yojik website     
DLI Greek Basic (1963-1966) – Live Lingua website     
Comprehensive introduction to spoken and written Modern Greek. Designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency (Level 5 is native-speaker proficiency). All Greek material appears in Greek orthography. Volumes I-VII present the Demotic spoken form of the language. Volume IX introduces Katharevousa, the literary, written form (oral drills in Demotic are continued throughout the course). Audio lingual method. The 2,943 pages of PDF texts and 35 hours of AUDIO recordings are freely-available via the Yojik and LiveLingua websites.

FSI Greek Basic (1967) – Yojik website
FSI Greek Basic (1967) – Live Lingua website
Comprehensive introduction to spoken and written Modern Greek. Audio-lingual method. Supported by 21 hours of AUDIO recordings. Emphasized “kathomilumeni” Greek, i.e., that of the “standard” speech of educated Greeks (at that time). Additionally, the “dhimotiki” and “kathaverusa” forms are represented in the Basic Dialogues and Grammatical Notes. Barron's Educational published Vol.I of this course as "Barron's Mastering Greek" (see subsequent discussion "FSI Basic Greek: Typesetting", below).

Relevance of FSI Greek Basic
There has been much discussion of the continued relevance of the FSI Greek Basic course, both on the HTLAL and the LLORG. There has been a considerable amount of misconception. Rather than argue in favour of the use of these materials myself, I offer the the following:
In August 2007, in the HTLAL thread FSI Greek is outdated? Γρηγόρη wrote:
I am a fluent speaker of Greek and have used the FSI course over the years for review and practice. Despite the age of the course, it is basically sound. The authors explain at the beginning of the course that they will teach kathomiloumeni (standard spoken Greek), which is neither extreme Demotiki nor extreme Katharevousa, but the language used by most educated speakers in everyday situations. Since Katharevousa lost its official status, this form of Greek has become the language of Greece.

There are some times in FSI where the lesson will teach some katharevousa elements, but it is always clear that they are such, and the demotic elements are presented simultaneously. And these are worth learning, anyways, since one still encounters them from time to time in Greece, especially in writing, e.g. the older genitive ending - εως for nouns like πόλη. Sometimes the authors even have a little fun with it, such as one lesson where the American asks for directions to the butcher, fishmonger, greengrocer, etc., using all the katharevousa terms, and the Greek replies, "You mean the …" and gives the demotic terms. This, again, is helpful because, in Greece to this day, nearly every one of these types of shops will have the katharevousa term on its sign, but everyone refers to it by its demotic name in speech.

Somewhere in the second volume, FSI begins introducing more and more katharevousa for the purposes of reading newspapers, etc. At that point, you can decide whether or not you want to keep on going with it or switch to other materials. But again, that can all be very useful if you want to attain a high level of fluency in the language, since educated Greeks still pepper their speech with katharevousa elements.

The short of it is, at least the first volume of FSI and the first half of the second volume are perfectly viable programs and, to be honest, some of the only rigorous materials out there for self-study.
   
Linguaphone Greek (1950s-1960s)
The Linguaphone courses of this period, comprising 50 lessons, introduced the L2 via a standardized set of scenes drawn from daily life. Course book in Greek text only. Handbook contains partial translations, notes. Approx. four (4) hours of AUDIO recordings. CEFR A2-B1.
On 10 Nov 2019, LoFr wrote:
Hi there, I was wondering if anyone could help me. I have the 1950s Linguaphone Greek course, the one with 50 lessons. Does this have the same problem as the Cortina course? Or does it teach Standard Modern / Demotic Greek? …
On 10 Nov 2019, Daristani wrote:
The (older) 50-lesson Linguaphone Greek course uses the old triple-accent system, so would appear to reflect the older state of the language. The newer Linguaphone course has the single-accent system, so seems to be the modern version. (Per my understanding, the accent system isn't the only difference, but it seems to be the most immediately obvious characteristic to check. Other differences, as far as I understand, largely pertain to the vocabulary used, and I'm not in a position to make a comparison in that regard.)

Linguaphone Greek (circa 1983)
In the early 1970s, Linguaphone commissioned complete revisions to the majority of their courses; their were a few exceptions. It would appear that Linguaphone Greek was last revised circa 1983. Introduction to spoken and written Greek. Self-instruction. Course book in Greek text only. Handbook contains partial translations, notes. Two Exercise manuals. Approx. eight (8) hours of AUDIO recordings. CEFR A2-B1.
On 10 Nov 2019, LoFr wrote:
Hi there, I was wondering if anyone could help me. I have the 1950s Linguaphone Greek course, the one with 50 lessons. Does this have the same problem as the Cortina course? Or does it teach Standard Modern / Demotic Greek? …
On 10 Nov 2019, Daristani wrote:
The (older) 50-lesson Linguaphone Greek course uses the old triple-accent system, so would appear to reflect the older state of the language. The newer Linguaphone course has the single-accent system, so seems to be the modern version. (Per my understanding, the accent system isn't the only difference, but it seems to be the most immediately obvious characteristic to check. Other differences, as far as I understand, largely pertain to the vocabulary used, and I'm not in a position to make a comparison in that regard.)

Learning Greek Through Conversation (197x - 1988)
Modern Greek for Adults (1988)
Modern Greek for The English Speaker (1988)
Modern Greek (197x)
Modern Greek for Foreign Students (197?) – AUDIO Recordings - CeLT
By Theodore C. Papaloizos; published by Papaloizos Publications. Introduction to Modern Greek. Most likely for classroom use. Course manuals were accompanied by eight (8) AUDIO cassettes. The Indiana University CeLT Recorded Sound Archives website hosts recordings having a similar name. There are a several comments on the LLORG to a Greek course which may, or may not, make reference to this one. Can anyone identify these materials?

Manual of Modern Greek I: For University Students: Elementary to Intermediate, (1983), 308 pages
Manual of Modern Greek II: For Native Speakers Elementary to Intermediate, (1983), 268 pages
By Anne Farmakides; Yale University Press
This series seems to date from the late 1970s. Used a combined synchronic/diachronic approach leading to proficiency in spoken and literary demotic as well as simple purist Greek. For classroom use. Likely CEFR B1. No mention of audio recordings. Most Amazon customer reviews were quite positive. Nevertheless, the dissenting voices scored a few points.

Spoken Greek (1945) Books I, II, by Henry Kahane et al.; Henry Holt and Company
Spoken Greek (1975) Books I, II, by Henry Kahane et al.; Spoken Language Services    
Developed to meet the needs of U.S. Armed Forces personnel during WWII. Employed the nascent audio-lingual method. Sets of 78 rpm vinyl records accompanied the half-sized course books. Nascent audio-lingual method. Reprinted in 1975 by Spoken Language Services. Copies of the course manuals are becoming rare. Copies of the audio cassettes are becoming even rarer.

Ta néa ellīniká gia xénous (1988, 1990), 347 pages, by Smaro Vogiatzidou et al.; University Studio Press
Ta néa ellīniká gia xénous – AUDIO Recordings - CeLT
This course book in Modern Greek may, or may not, be associated with the audio recordings which are freely-available via the Indiana University CeLT Recorded Sound Archives website. Comments?

Modern Greek Grammars, Dictionaries, Readers, Literature, etc. (Legacy)
For reasons of expediency, irrespective of their dates of publication, “legacy” grammars, dictionaries, readers, etc., have been presented in the “contemporary” section of resources.

EDITED:
Completely revised: April 2020



Speakeasy
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 2565 days ago

502 posts - 1090 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 3 of 5
05 May 2020 at 11:58pm | IP Logged 
3. MODERN GREEK RESOURCES: CONTEMPORARY

Modern Greek Courses, Supplements, etc.

Akou Na Deis: Listening Comprehension in Greek: Levels 1, 2, 3 (1998,2008)
Listen Here - Akou Na Deis: Listening Comprehension in Greek: Levels 1, 2, 3 (1998,2008)
By Lelia Panteloglou, F. Arvanitaki; published by Deltos Books. Listening comprehension supplemental materials: graded dialogues, interviews, exercises, solutions. Each workbook includes an AUDIO CD. It may be that the “Akou Na Deis” videos are related to this series (see link above). Available directly from the publisher or via major online booksellers’ websites. No Amazon customer reviews. Favourable comments from a few HTLAL members.

Assimil Modern Greek: Current generation
Assimil Le grec (sans peine) (circa 2017), 624 pages, by Jean-Pierre Guglielmi
Available in FRENCH only. Publisher confirms that both the current and the previous generations of their Modern Greek courses present the Demotic variety of the language. Circa 100 progressively-difficult dialogues and short exercise sets with translations, accompanied by 2-3/4 hours of AUDIO recordings. CEFR A2-B1. Excellent reviews.

Assimil Modern Greek: Previous generation
Assimil Le nouvea grec sans peine (circa 1999), 616 pages, by Katerina Kedra Blayo
Assimil Griechisch ohne Mühe (circa 1999), 616 pages, by Katerina Kedra Blayo
Assimil Il nuovo greco sins sforza (circa 1999), 616 pages, by Katerina Kedra Blayo
Out-of-print. Was available in FRENCH, German, and Italian only. Publisher confirms that both the current and the previous generations of their Modern Greek courses present the Demotic variety of the language. Circa 100 progressively-difficult dialogues and short exercise sets with translations, accompanied by 2-3/4 hours of AUDIO recordings. CEFR A2-B1. Amazon customer reviews (French, German, Italian) predominately favourable. Dissenting comments bely inexperience in foreign language self-instruction.

Assimil Modern Greek: Selected Discussions (numerous others exist)
Assimil’s Modern Greek Course – HTLAL – April 2011
When should I start Assimil Greek? – LLORG – May 2016

BBC Greek Language and People (original 1983, new edition 2010) by David Hardy
BBC Greek Language and People - YouTube
Out-of-print. Familiarization courses: CEFR A0+. In the 1980’s, the BBC broadcast a series of televised language courses for the study of a number of popular languages: French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Spanish, and Russian. Course books and audio recordings (LP vinyl records, cassettes and, subsequently, CDs of approx.2-1/2 hours duration) were available for purchase. In the 2000’s, a number of the course books and audio recordings were revised; however, the videos were not updated. The series was quite popular. BBC Greek Language and People was well-received.

BBC Talk Greek (3rd ed., 2015), 144 pages, by Karen Rich
BBC Talk Greek – BBC Languages Online
Minimal communication needs: CEFR A0. Includes one (1) AUDIO CD.

Breakthrough Greek (1988) by Eleni Gambarotta, Jennifer Scamp; Palgrave Macmillan
Out-of-print. Self-instruction, book plus three (3) AUDIO cassettes. CEFR A1 (minus). Vintage, well-received at the time.

Colloquial Greek, 2nd ed. (2015) by Niki Watts; Routledge
Colloquial Greek: AUDIO Recordings – Routledge website
These introductory courses come in two types: (1) a very summary presentation of the target language suitable to meet the basic “transactional needs” of a short-term visitor to the region where the language predominates, having a level upon completion of CEFR A0, and (2) a more in-depth presentation of the language and its grammatical structure which, while designed to meet the needs of visitor, has the potential for CEFR A1+. Materials include approx. two (2) hours of AUDIO recordings. Amazon customer reviews for “Colloquial Greek” are quite positive.

Communicate in Greek Levels 1,2,3 (2010) by Kleanthis Arvanitakis, Frosso Arvanitakis
Communicate in Greek – Homepage
Communicate in Greek for Beginners (Book & CD): Example – amazon.co.uk
Collection of three progressive courses (beginner, intermediate, advanced). Classroom or self-instruction. Two workbooks per level (300-plus pages) and one AUDIO CD. Amazon customer reviews and comments on the LLORG have been quite positive.

Complete Greek (2014) by Aristarhos Matsukas; Teach Yourself Books
Staple CEFR A1 course for self-instruction. Includes two (2) AUDIO CDs.   Amazon custom reviews tend on the negative side. Complaints are related to the lack of synchronisation between the tracks on the audio CDs and their references in the course manual.

DLI GLOSS Greek
Supplemental materials for reading/aural/oral practice. Access is free.

Ellinika A - Greek 1 - Method for Learning Greek as a Foreign Language (2010, 2015)
Ellinika B - Greek 2 - Method for Learning Greek as a Foreign Language (2012, 2015)
By G. Simopoulos; published by Ekdoseis Pataki. Classroom use. Each level: 300 pages, plus two (2) AUDIO CDs. Combined, probably CEFR A2+. Only a few Amazon reviews: quite positive.

ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ ΤΩΡΑ 1+1 / Ellinka Tora 1+1 / Greek Now 1+1 (1992, 2002)
ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ ΤΩΡΑ 2+2 / Ellinka Tora 2+2 / Greek Now 2+2 (1992, 2006)
By Dimitra and Papacheimona; published by Nostos Editions. Classroom use. Each level: 300 pages plus two (2) AUDIO CDs. Combined, probably CEFR A2+. LLORG member William Camden commented positively on these materials in 2017. Amazon customer reviews: sparse but generally positive.

Filoglossia: Learning Greek as a Foreign Language - xanati
Online. Originally introduced as a multimedia course on CD-ROM discs (videos, interactive exercises, etc.); the website now offers the lessons directly. Comments on the internet have been quite positive.

Glossika Modern Greek
Not a course of study. Rather, a collection of some 3,000 sentences for repetition SRS fashion. Goal is greater automaticity in spoken communications.

Greek Basic Course (1993), 347 pages, by S. Obolensky et al.; Hippocrene Books
Style of Greek is “Kathomilumeni”. Subsequent to listing this item, Daristani confirmed that this publication was a reprint of FSI Greek Basic, Volume I (1967), in a somewhat smaller format.

Greek Today: A Course in the Modern Language and Culture (2004), 608 pages
Greek Today Workbook (2004), 208 pages
Greek Today - Dartmouth College
By Peter Bien et al.; published by Dartmouth College Press. Revised and expanded edition of Demotic Greek I (see “legacy” materials, above). Communicative approach. Classroom use. Course book includes one (1) AUDIO CD. Additional materials on website. CEFR B1. Amazon customer reviews: quite positive.

Griechisch mit System (5th ed., 2017), 288 pages, by Athanasios Anastasiadis et al.; Langenscheidt Verlag
Available in German only. Self-instruction. Includes three (3) AUDIO CDs. Amazon.DE reviews quite positive.

Hugo Greek in Three Months (1987) by Niki Watts; Hunter Publications / DK Publishing
Out-of-print. Self-instruction: dialogues, grammar. Four (4) hours AUDIO recordings. CEFR A2. Series very popular.

Just Listen 'N Learn Greek (1995), circa 200 pages, by Brian Hill; Passport Books
Out-of-print. Self-instruction: dialogues, exercises. Recordings NOT by voice-trained speakers. Three (3) hours of AUDIO recordings. CEFR A1 for one-level course, higher for two-level course. Amazon reviews: mixed to positive.

Klik sta Ellinika A1 - Click on Greek A1 (2014)
Klik sta Ellinika A2 - Click on Greek A2 (2017)     
Klik sta Ellinika B1 - Click on Greek B1 (2017)
Klik sta Ellinika B2 - Click on Greek B2 (2016)
By M. Karakyrgiou and V. Panagiotidou; published by Deltos. Materials in GREEK only: one textbook (circa 250 pages) plus two (2) AUDIO CDs per level. Classroom use. No reviews.

Krytos: Learn Greek
Online. Currently composed of 105 audio files (around 15 minutes each), student notes, collaborative learning tools, a Greek dictionary, and a Greek spell checker. Apparently, there might be a few technical problems with this website.
guyome wrote:
Just wanted to mention that the audio files of the lessons can be accessed legally without registration here: Learn Greek by Radio    

Language Transfer: Greek
Mentioned repeatedly in the “Modern Greek Study Group” and elsewhere.

Learn Greek Without A Teacher (1991), 349 pages, by Graciela Feller; (Mandeson Series) Mandeson
Aprenda Griego sin Profesor (2007), 318 pages, de Graciela Feller; (Mandeson Series) Diagoras
Available separately in English and in Spanish. Introductory course. Self-instruction. No mention of audio recordings. CEFR A2-B1. Few Amazon reviews, but all are positive.

Living Language Greek Complete (circa 2012), by Stamatina Mastorakou; Random House
Staple CEFR A1 series. Three course manuals plus nine (9) AUDIO CDs which, regrettably, contain an inordinate amount of English voice-overs. Customer Reviews and comments on both the HTLAL and the LLORG have been very positive.

Living Language Spoken World Greek (2009); Random House
The approach to teaching of the “Spoken World” series is identical to that adopted by this publisher’s “Ultimate” series, the only difference between the two being slightly less content in the former and in the inclusion of six (6) AUDIO CDs of recordings as opposed to the 8 audio CDs of the latter. Dialogues, narratives, exercises, notes on grammar and culture.   CEFR A2+ range. Reviews on the internet are sparse, but uniformly positive.

Méthode de grec moderne, Volumes 1,2 (1998, 2009, 2018) de Henri Tonnet et Georgios Galanes
Available in French only. Mentioned by member Expugnator as one of the resources he was planning to use. Possibly intended for classroom use. Includes AUDIO recordings. Amazon customer reviews: very positive.

Michel Thomas Total Greek Foundation Course (2009 or earlier)
Michel Thomas Perfect Greek Intermediate Course (2009 or earlier)
By Hara Garoufalia-Middle and Howard Middle; published by Hodder Education. Venerable “all audio” Michel Thomas Method. Instructor slowly guides two English-speaking students through the present tense and past tense conjugation of a small selection of high-frequency of verbs. CEFR A0+. Amazon customer reviews: very positive.

Modern Greek for Beginners (Greek123.com)
Online Greek course. Over 500 pages of material. Over 2,000 vocabulary words. Dictionary. Dialogues, readings. Live-action videos .

NFLC Greek –University of Maryland
Collection of graded exercise sets for supplemental practice (reading, aural, occasionally videos). Similar to DLI GLOSS. Access: US$ 5.00 monthly subscription.

Parlons grec moderne (2008) by Cyril Aslanov, 296 pages; Editions L’Harmattan
Available in FRENCH only. Apparently, this work is not so much a course on how to speak Modern Greek as it is a treatise on the language. No mention of audio recordings on the publisher’s website. One Amazon.FR view: 2 stars.

Pimsleur Greek I, II - Simon & Schuster
Well-known “all audio” course. CEFR A0+. Reviews are generally quite positive.

Power of Modern Greek Basic Course I (1986) by Strati Demertzis; Expressway
Power of Modern Greek Basic Course II (1986) by Strati Demertzis; Expressway
No information on this course. Might the “hidden treasure” that you’ve all been looking for!

Rosetta Stone Greek
The Rosetta Stone courses/application have not received very good reviews on the HTLAL and the LLORG. And yet, the company is still in business and many “genuine” customers continue to report their complete satisfaction with these products. Recently, member zenmonkey commented: “Apparently the new version is actually somewhere between not bad and good. But I’ve tried an old old version for German and Hebrew. I’d rather scoop my brains out with a butter knife that use that old method.”

Spoken Greek, 2nd ed. (1992), 208 pages, by Evris Tsakirides; University of Michigan Press
Introductory course in spoken Modern Greek. No mention of audio recordings. Only one Amazon customer review (2017): 1 star.   

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE ...

EDITED:
Completely revised: April 2020



Speakeasy
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 2565 days ago

502 posts - 1090 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 4 of 5
06 May 2020 at 12:00am | IP Logged 
3. MODERN GREEK RESOURCES: CONTEMPORARY (CONT’D)

Modern Greek Phrase Books, Language Guides, etc.
This list is not exhaustive, it is but a small sample of the numerous phrasebooks and language guides available for language students and travellers.

Berlitz Greek Phrase Book & Dictionary, (2012), 224 pages; Berlitz Publishing

Collins Easy Learning Greek Audio Course (2016), 48 pages, by Athena Economides; HarperCollins UK
Essential (phrasebook) communications. Includes three (3) AUDIO CDs.   Amazon customer reviews quite positive.

Collins Greek Phrasebook and Dictionary Gem Edition: Essential Phrases and Words, (4th ed., 2016), 256 pages,; HarperCollins UK

Greek Dictionary & Phrasebook, (2012), 238 pages; Hippocrene Books

Kauderwelsch Griechisch, by Karin Spitzing et al.; Reise Know-How Verlag
Kauderwelsch-Sprachführer Griechisch - Wort für Wort, (22nd ed., 2019), 192 pages
Kauderwelsch-Sprachführer Griechisch - Wort für Wort plus Wörterbuch, (2nd ed., 2019), 360 pages
Kauderwelsch-AusspracheTrainer Griechisch – AUDIO Recordings
Available in German only. Phrasebook, or Phrasebook plus Dictionary, supplemented by AUDIO recordings (extracts only). Sold separately.

Lonely Planet Greek Phrasebook & Dictionary, (7th ed., 2019), 256 pages, by Thanasis Spilias; Lonely Planet

Read and Speak Greek for Beginners (2nd ed., 2011), 112 pages, by Hara Garoufalia-Middl; McGraw-Hill
Phrasebook/familiarization. Slim course book and one (1) AUDIO CD. CEFR A0.

Rough Guide Greek Phrasebook, (2011), 240 pages; Rough Guides

Modern Greek Grammars, Script, Writing, etc.
This list is not exhaustive, it is but a small sample of the numerous grammars available for this language. For reasons of expediency, irrespective of their dates of publication, “legacy” grammars have been presented here, in the “contemporary” section of resources.

======= Grammars: General =======

Essential Modern Greek Grammar (1988) by Douglas Q. Adams; Dover Publications

Greek: A Comprehensive Grammar of the Modern Language, (2nd ed., 2012), 688 pages, by David Holton, Peter Mackridge, et al.; Routledge
Greek: An Essential Grammar (2015) by David Holton, Peter Mackridge, et al.; Routledge

Modern Greek Grammar Notes for Absolute Beginners (2015) by M. Poulopoulou; Hellenic Academic EBooks
Modern Greek Grammar Notes for Absolute Beginners (2015) by M. Poulopoulou; Hellenic Academic EBooks
A downloadable PDF document on the grammar of Modern Greek appropriate for students at the CEFR A1/A2 level. Contributed by zjones and Daristani.

Odos Grammatikis: your companion when learning modern Greek, (2014), xxx pages; Deltos
This book, apparently destined for students of Modern Greek, appears to be written in Greek, not in English.

======= Grammars: Script, Writing, etc. =======

Greek Alphabet Tutorial – langintro.com

Teach Yourself Read and write Greek script (2012) by Sheila Hunt and Dennis Couniacis; Teach Yourself Books

======= Grammars: Miscellany =======

About the Greek Language; Harry Foundalis

Mystika Orthografias, (2009), 243 pages, by Lelia Panteloglou; Deltos
Description of the phonetic system. Spelling rules with examples. Grammar exercises in each chapter. Answers to the exercises. This book, apparently destined for students of Modern Greek, appears to be written in Greek, not in English.

Modern Greek Dictionaries, etc.
This list is not exhaustive, it is but a small sample of the numerous dictionaries available for this language. For reasons of expediency, irrespective of their dates of publication, “legacy” dictionaries have been presented here, in the “contemporary” section of resources.

======= Dictionaries: General =======

ΛΕΞΙΚΌ - LEXICON Greek-English-Greek dictionary
Online dictionary

Collins Greek Dictionary: Essential Edition, (2019), 448 pages; HarperCollins UK

Etymological Dictionary of Greek (2 Vols.), (2016), 1808 pages, by Robert Beekes; Brill Academic Pub

Greek Key Words: The Basic 2,000 Word Vocabulary (2013) by Jerry Toner; Oleander Press

Learn Greek Now!: 10,000 Most Frequent Words (2018) by Konstantinos Petrianos; Amazon Digital Services

Oxford Greek-English Learner's Dictionary, (2009), 1024 pages, by D N Stavropoulos; Oxford University Press

Oxford New Greek Dictionary, The, (rev. 2008), 480 pages, by Oxford University Press; Berkley

Pocket Oxford Greek Dictionary, The (2000) by J.T. Pring; Oxford University Press

======= Dictionaries: Specialist =======

English Words from Latin and Greek Elements, (2nd ed., 1986), 290 pages, by Donald M. Myers et al.; University of Arizona Press

Modern Greek Readers, Literature, etc.
This list is not exhaustive, it is but a small sample of the numerous readers available for this language. For reasons of expediency, irrespective of their dates of publication, “legacy” readers have been presented here, in the “contemporary” section of resources.

Deltos Books: Greek Easy Readers
Publisher of courses, grammars, readers, et cetera for the study of Greek.

Lydia: A Summer in Greece: Easy Reader (Λυδία: Ένα καλοκαίρι στην Ελλάδα!)

Modern Greek Reader for Beginners, A (1974) by J.T. Pring; Hodder Arnold H&S

Modern Greek Reader, I: Language and Civilization: Elementary to Intermediate, (1983), 308 pages
Modern Greek Reader, I: Language and Civilization: Intermediate, (1983), 283 pages
Modern Greek Reader, II: Introduction to Literature Intermediate to Advanced, (1983), 248 pages
By Anne Farmakides; Yale University Press

Routledge Modern Greek Reader: Greek Folktales for Learning Modern Greek, (2015), 180 pages, by Maria Kaliambou; Routledge

Polyglot Planet (now LingoJump) : Greek Parallel Text Readers
Learn Greek: Parallel Text, et cetera; Polyglot Planet Publishing

Wikipedia in Greek - Βικιπαίδεια

CONCLUDED ON NEXT PAGE ...

EDITED:
Completely revised: April 2020

1 person has voted this message useful



Speakeasy
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 2565 days ago

502 posts - 1090 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 5 of 5
06 May 2020 at 12:00am | IP Logged 
3. MODERN GREEK RESOURCES: CONTEMPORARY (CONCL.)

Modern Greek Miscellany

Deltos Books
Publisher of courses, grammars, readers, et cetera for the study of Greek.

Greek Language in Canada - website
Includes lists of resources for the study of Greek, programs of study at numerous schools/colleges, etc.
On 4 Apr 2020, in the Modern Greek Study Group, embici wrote:
In case anyone is interested, there is a new website that lists resources for learning Geek. It's goal, as stated on the site is "to support Greek language education, to maintain Canada's linguistic & cultural resources and to foster intercultural awareness." https://greeklanguage.ca/en/
Greek Tutors : Just Learn

Hellenic American Union
The “Learning Resources” section includes: (a) a series of 80 lessons in Modern Greek via podcast, and (b) 10 video lessons to assists visitors learn Greek.

Hellenic Republic, General Secretariat for Media and Communication

Masaresi: Your Greek Shop
Online store offering Greek books, courses, et cetera.

Modern Greek Media
This list is not exhaustive, it is but a small sample of the multitude of Greek media resources. While I would like to respond positively to requests to add new items to this list, I cannot make such a commitment, there are simply too many media resources out there for me to make even an attempt at listing them all.

Aggelioforos

Citypress - News Blog - Ενημερωτικό & ειδησεογραφικό blog

Deutsche Welle - ΘΕΜΑΤΑ

Global Recordings Network: Greek language
Evangelism tools, church planting resources, Christian songs and audio bible study materials. Download free MP3
     
Greek Internet Radio (list provided by Multilingualbooks)

Greek Newspapers Online (list provided by Multilingualbooks)

Greek Newspapers - Onlinenewspapers.com

Voice of American (Greek)

Μαθαίνουμε στο Σπίτι (We learn at home) - YouTube
embici wrote:
A source of Greek content that some might find helpful is the following YouTube playlist by the Greek TV network, ERT. It is called Μαθαίνουμε στο Σπίτι (We learn at home). It includes videos of Greek school teachers teaching different subjects at all grade levels. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgeq7ezNgWe94VavlcE6H C0k8RVanZWPe


4. IMPROVING THIS FILE?
Please feel at liberty to post your own recommendations and/or comments and I’ll see what I can do about incorporating them into the lists above.

5. SUBSEQUENT COMMENTS
Visitors to this file are encouraged to review the subsequent comments, posted below, as they include members’ suggestions concerning materials and form a running commentary on resources for the study of this language.

EDITED:
Completely revised: April 2020





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