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Cambodian / Khmer Resources -

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Speakeasy
Senior Member
Canada
Joined 2599 days ago

502 posts - 1091 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 1 of 1
06 May 2020 at 2:11am | IP Logged 
FOR REPOSTING TO THE “A LANGUAGE LEARNERS’ FORUM” (LLORG)
During the period from February 2020 through May 2020, I conducted a complete revision to the twenty-eight (28) lists of resources which I had posted on the LLORG during the previous three-year period. As revising these types of documents directly on the LLORG in the “Edit Mode” is fraught with difficulties, I removed their contents from the LLORG, stored them on my computer, and completed the revisions. During the revision process an event occurred which prevented me from reposting the contents to their original files and, as a contingency measure, I have posted them here on the HTLAL in the anticipation that either the Administrator or the Moderators of the LLORG will copy/paste them to the LLORG. - Speakeasy

1. INTRODUCTION

Cambodia
Cambodia, also Kampuchea, officially the Kingdom of Cambodia is a country located in the southern portion of the Indochina peninsula in Southeast Asia. It is 181,035 square kilometres (69,898 square miles) in area, bordered by Thailand to the northwest, Laos to the northeast, Vietnam to the east and the Gulf of Thailand to the southwest. The sovereign state of Cambodia has a population of over 15 million. The official religion is Theravada Buddhism, practised by approximately 95 percent of the population. Cambodia's minority groups include Vietnamese, Chinese, Chams and 30 hill tribes. The capital and largest city is Phnom Penh, the political, economic and cultural centre of Cambodia. The kingdom is an elective constitutional monarchy with a monarch, currently Norodom Sihamoni, chosen by the Royal Council of the Throne as head of state. The head of government is the Prime Minister. – Source: Wikipedia

Languages Spoken in Cambodia
The overwhelming majority of the Cambodian population, even those that are not native to the country, speak the language known as Khmer, the official language of the country. Ethnic Khmer living in Thailand, in Vietnam, and in Laos speak dialects of Khmer that are more or less intelligible to Khmer speakers from Cambodia. Minority languages present in Cambodia include Vietnamese, Cham (and other Austronesian languages), and the languages of the various hill tribes.

Khmer (Cambodian) Language
Khmer or Cambodian is the language of the Khmer people and the official language of Cambodia. With approximately 16 million speakers, it is the second most widely spoken Austroasiatic language (after Vietnamese). Khmer has been influenced considerably by Sanskrit and Pali, especially in the royal and religious registers, through Hinduism and Buddhism. The more colloquial registers have influenced, and have been influenced by, Thai, Lao, Vietnamese, and Cham, all of which, due to geographical proximity and long-term cultural contact, form a sprachbund in peninsular Southeast Asia. It is also the earliest recorded and earliest written language of the Mon–Khmer family, predating Mon and by a significant margin Vietnamese, due to Old Khmer being the language of the historical empires of Chenla, Angkor and, presumably, their earlier predecessor state, Funan. -- Source: Wikipedia
     
2. CAMBODIAN RESOURCES: LEGACY

Cambodian courses, supplements, etc.

Cambodian Intensive Basic Course (1988), 2175 pages, by William Patterson, Rath Chim, Robert Hedley; Dunwoody Press
Comprehensive/intensive course comprising an impressive 2,175 pages of instructional materials. Out-of-print. Printed copies rare on internet. In July 2008, there was a brief discussion of this course on the HTLAL: Dunwoody Intensive Basic Course

Cambodian-Khmer (reprint 2011), 444 pages, by John Haiman; John Benjamins Publishing Judging by the editor’s description on Amazon, this textbook would appear to date from a now-distant period.

DLI Cambodian/Khmer (1970); U.S. Armed Forces Defense Language Institute
There is evidence of a “DLI Basic Cambodian” course on the ERIC website; the PDFs are pending restoration and are not presently accessible. I have been unable to locate copies of the course manuals or of the associated audio recordings on any other websites.

FSI Cambodian/Khmer (1966, 1972)
The “FSI Basic Cambodian (1966)” and “FSI Cambodian Contemporary (1972)” courses are both available on the Yojik.eu website. Audio-lingual method.

Spoken Cambodian (Modern Spoken Cambodian) (1945, reprinted 1970), 480 pages, by Franklin E. Huffman; Yale University Press
Spoken Cambodian (Modern Spoken Cambodian) AUDIO Recordings
The latest edition of the course manual "Modern Spoken Cambodian" was published in 1970 by Yale University Press as a reprint of a basic introduction to the language which first appeared during WWII as part of a broad programme sponsored by the U.S. War Department. Comments on Amazon clearly indicate that the then-nascent audio-lingual method was used. NOTE CAREFULLY: Audio recordings which were prepared to accompany this book, are available for sale in mp3 format from Cornell University.
     
U.S. Peace-Corps Cambodian/Khmer - NONE

3. CAMBODIAN RESOURCES: CONTEMPORARY

Cambodian courses, supplements, etc.

Assimil Le Khmer (2013) by Michel Rethy Antelme et al.
Available in FRENCH only. The majority of the reviews on Amazon.FR are quite positive. One dissenting reviewer chose to assign “1 star” to this course and expressed their opinion that this course does not correctly treat the differences of sounds (vowels, consonants).

Cambodian for Beginners, (2nd ed. 2008), 300 pages, by Richard Gilbert; Paiboon Publishing
Likely CEFR A2. Course book and three (3) AUDIO CDs seem to be sold separately. Amazon customer reviews generally positive.

Colloquial Cambodian (2015) by Chhany Sak-Humphry; Routledge
Colloquial Cambodian AUDIO Recordings; Routledge website
There appear to be two separate generations of Routledge's "Colloquial Cambodian." The first generation, authored by David Smyth, was published in 1995 and went through a couple of revisions. A second generation course, authored by Chhany Sak-Humphry, was published in 2015, for which the MP3 AUDIO files are now freely available via Routledge's website. There are three very well-written customer reviews of the new version of this course on the Amazon.co.uk website.

Complete Cambodian/Khmer; Teach Yourself Books - NONE
     
DLI Khmer Headstart2 – NONE

DLI GLOSS Cambodian/Khmer files – NONE

Parlons Kouy: Une langue môn-khmer (2006), 298 pages, by Jacques Rongier; Editions L'Harmattan
Available in FRENCH only.   

University of Hawaii, Online Khmer (Cambodian)

Cambodian Phrasebooks, Language Guides, etc.
The items below represent a selection of the available phrasebooks and language guides for this language.

Cambodian Phrasebook (2nd ed., 2018), 132 pages, by Samantha Tame et al.; CreateSpace Independent Publishing

DLI Khmer Khmer Survival Kits
The DLIFLC website provides free access to phrasebook-style downloadable PDF and MP3 files.

English-Khmer Phrasebook with Useful Wordlist: (For Cambodians) (1980), 140 pages; Center for Applied Linguistics
NOTE: This phrasebook was written for Cambodians. Nevertheless, it might be of some use to students of Khmer.

Kauderwelsch Khmer; Reise Know-How
Kauderwelsch-Sprachführer Khmer - Wort für Wort
Kauderwelsch AusspracheTrainer Khmer AUDIO Recordings
Available in German only. Phrasebook and AUDIO recordings (extracts only). Sold separately.

Khmenglish Language Guide: Definitive Dictionary to Understand English Slang usage in Cambodia (2019) 65 pages, by Anton Martinovich; Independently published

Khmer-English/English-Khmer Dictionary & Phrasebook (2013), 354 pages, by Soksan Ngoun; Hippocrene Books

Lonely Planet Cambodia (Travel Guide) (11th ed., 2018), 384 page; Lonely Planet
NOTE: This is a Travel Guide, not a Phrasebook. Nevertheless, some students might find it interesting.

U.S. Army Special Forces 200-Hour Khmer Familiarization Course
Emphasis on basic communication needs. The “200 hours” refers to contact time in the classroom. Materials themselves evoke a language guide. In self-study, CEFR A0 upon completion.

Cambodian Grammars, etc.

Reserved

Cambodian Dictionaries, etc.

Cambodian-English Glossary (1981), 152 pages, by Franklin Huffman and Im Proum; Yale University Press
Designed to accompany the series of Cambodian readers prepared by Franklin E. Huffman and Im Proum, this work is now reissued as an aid not only to students of the Cambodian language but also to Cambodians residing in English-speaking countries.

Complete Medical Dictionary: English to Khmer, Khmer to English (2012), 348 pages, by William Hatch et al.; CreateSpace Independent Publishing

English-Khmer Dictionary (1978), 709 pages, by Franklin E. Huffman et al.; Yale University Press
Khmenglish Language Guide: Definitive Dictionary to Understand English Slang usage in Cambodia (2019) 65 pages, by Anton Martinovich; Independently published

Tuttle Practical Cambodian Dictionary (1995), 232 pages, by David Smyth et al.; Tuttle Publishing

Cambodian Readers, Literature, etc.

Cambodian System of Writing and Beginning Reader (1st of 3) (1970), 380 pages, by Franklin Huffman and Im Proum; Yale University Press
The reader contains 32 selections from some of the most important and best-known works of Cambodian literature in a variety of genres - historical prose, folktales, epic poetry, didactic verse, religious literature, the modern novel, poems and songs, and so forth.

Intermediate Cambodian Reader (2nd of 3) (1972), 502 pages, by Franklin Huffman and Im Proum; Yale University Press
This book is a sequel to the author’s Cambodian System of Writing and Beginning Reader, published by the Yale University Press in 1970. It is intended to develop the student’s ability to the point of reading unedited Cambodian texts with the aid of a dictionary.

Cambodian Literary Reader and Glossary (3rd of 3) (1977), 336 pages, by Franklin Huffman and Im Proum; Yale University Press
Cambodian Literary Reader and Glossary (3rd of 3) AUDIO Recordings    
The reader contains thirty-two selections from some of the most important and best-known works of Cambodian literature in a variety of genres – historical prose, folktales, epic poetry, didactic verse, religious literature, the modern novel, poems and songs, and so forth. NOTE CAREFULLY: AUDIO recordings which were prepared to accompany this book, are available for sale in mp3 format from Cornell University.

Cambodian-English Glossary (1981), 152 pages, by Franklin Huffman and Im Proum; Yale University Press
Designed to accompany the series of Cambodian readers prepared by Franklin E. Huffman and Im Proum, this work is now reissued as an aid not only to students of the Cambodian language but also to Cambodians residing in English-speaking countries.

Cambodian Miscellany

Learn Khmer Language: Resources - Cambopedia

Learn Khmer Now with Vanna

4. IMPROVING THIS FILE?
Please feel at liberty to post your own recommendations and/or comments and I’ll see what I can do about incorporating them into the lists above.

5. SUBSEQUENT COMMENTS
Visitors to this file are encouraged to review the subsequent comments, posted below, as they include members’ suggestions concerning materials and forms a running commentary on resources for the study of Khmer/Cambodian .


EDITED:
Completely revised: April, 2020




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