Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Super-fast vocabulary learning techniques

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
255 messages over 32 pages: << Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 19 ... 31 32 Next >>
audiolang
Diglot
Senior Member
Romania
Joined 6156 days ago

108 posts - 109 votes 
2 sounds
Speaks: Romanian*, English

 
 Message 145 of 255
30 September 2007 at 10:24pm | IP Logged 
yes patoso
1 person has voted this message useful



leosmith
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6386 days ago

2365 posts - 3804 votes 
Speaks: English*
Studies: Tagalog

 
 Message 146 of 255
01 October 2007 at 2:34am | IP Logged 
patoso wrote:
Is it possible to learn 1000 words a day?

There are memory competitions where people actually do this (sorry - I don't have a link). It sort of depends on how you define "learn"; they are merely required to reproduce the words verbally, I think. They probably forget them completely by the next day. It's unlikely someone could do the review required to maintain that pace.
1 person has voted this message useful





Iversen
Super Polyglot
Moderator
Denmark
berejst.dk
Joined 6539 days ago

9078 posts - 16473 votes 
Speaks: Danish*, French, English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Swedish, Esperanto, Romanian, Catalan
Studies: Afrikaans, Greek, Norwegian, Russian, Serbian, Icelandic, Latin, Irish, Lowland Scots, Indonesian, Polish, Croatian
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 147 of 255
01 October 2007 at 3:33am | IP Logged 
I have described in the beginning of this thread how I make word lists. I won't repeat the details here, but I end up with a folded sheet of paper, i.e. 4 halfpages, each divided into 3x3 columns. Such a halfpage contains roughly 100 words, and with a language where I'm not a total novice I can work my way through these words in between one and one and a half hour. Which in principle means that I could do 1000 words in one day. In practice it won't work, because the effect of doing the lists diminishes after a few hours. I would be totally splattered out before I got halfways through the required 10-15 hours.

When I do these lists I do a check-up a day or two later, less to control the recall rate than to fixate the words in my memory. But I would be disappointed with less than say 80-90% recall rate. However without use these words will glide back into my passive vocabulary, so it is still essential to read and listen to as much genuine material as possible, - both to adjust one's sense of the meanings of the words in real situations and to remind oneself of the whole purpose of learning all those words.

1 person has voted this message useful



Platiquemos
Hexaglot
Language Program Publisher
Senior Member
Panama
platiquemos-letstalk
Joined 6998 days ago

126 posts - 141 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Spanish, Dutch, Swedish, Finnish

 
 Message 148 of 255
08 October 2007 at 1:44pm | IP Logged 
I haven´t read carefully the posts on this thread. However, I believe structure (the awful for grammar) is far more inportant than vocabulary--with the exception of irregular verbs.
Vocabulary is easy. You can look it up, ask somebody, etc. No matter how many words you know, though, without structure you won't be understood--nor understand the other.
Yes, vocabulary is important. But vocabulary alone won´t get you anywhere. For the first levels of proficiency (ACTFL advanced, or FSI 2) structure is key.
Many programs for sale specialize in vocabulary--to my mind a great mistake.
The FSI Basic Course, on which Platiquemos is based, stresses structure--but still has some 3,000 words of vocabulary.
As ever, curmugeonly yours,
DonC
1 person has voted this message useful



Linguamor
Decaglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6454 days ago

469 posts - 599 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, French, Norwegian, Portuguese, Dutch

 
 Message 149 of 255
09 October 2007 at 6:37am | IP Logged 
Platiquemos wrote:

No matter how many words you know, though, without structure you won't be understood--nor understand the other.


Research has shown that misunderstanding and failure to communicate is more often the result of incorrect use of vocabulary than incorrect grammar. Structure is essential, but vocabulary is equally essential for proficiency.

2 persons have voted this message useful



audiolang
Diglot
Senior Member
Romania
Joined 6156 days ago

108 posts - 109 votes 
2 sounds
Speaks: Romanian*, English

 
 Message 150 of 255
09 October 2007 at 6:56am | IP Logged 
True Linguamor.Language is consisted of these two elements like yin and yang .
Some people have more Yin, others have more Yang in mind

Edited by audiolang on 09 October 2007 at 6:57am

1 person has voted this message useful



Platiquemos
Hexaglot
Language Program Publisher
Senior Member
Panama
platiquemos-letstalk
Joined 6998 days ago

126 posts - 141 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Spanish, Dutch, Swedish, Finnish

 
 Message 151 of 255
09 October 2007 at 8:35am | IP Logged 
Well, Linguamor, I guess I stand corrected. My opinions are based on experience, not research. Yes, both vocabulary and structure are important. I just believe that vocaabulary is easier to obtain--if nothing else, with good structure and a modicum of grammar you can at least talk around a word you don´t know--and in my experience, your interlocutor will figure out what you're trying to say and supply the word. This is just my opinion, of course.
1 person has voted this message useful



Linguamor
Decaglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6454 days ago

469 posts - 599 votes 
Speaks: English*, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, French, Norwegian, Portuguese, Dutch

 
 Message 152 of 255
09 October 2007 at 5:35pm | IP Logged 
Platiquemos wrote:
I just believe that vocaabulary is easier to obtain--if nothing else, with good structure and a modicum of grammar you can at least talk around a word you don´t know--and in my experience, your interlocutor will figure out what you're trying to say and supply the word.


I guess I see what you're saying - if you know the structure and have a basic vocabulary, you can somehow get your meaning across.

In my opinion, learning a language means learning how to express what you want to express in the way that native speakers express it. This means learning to use the vocabulary the way native speakers use it. How is this easier than learning the structure?


     


1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 255 messages over 32 pages: << Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.4375 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2024 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.