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How to study?

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies Post Reply
48 messages over 6 pages: 1 2 3 4 5


jeff_lindqvist
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 Message 41 of 48
20 June 2007 at 2:58am | IP Logged 
For the final exam in Russian we should read a couple of short stories, translate them into good Swedish, and then at the day of the exam we were given extracts to translate from memory (=we were prepared, but we didn't know exactly what would show up). Anyway, for some of the texts I read a "proper" Swedish translation side by side, but as Iversen says, it wasn't until I translated the text myself (loosely inspired by the Swedish that I had read) it really stuck.
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ibanezmonster
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 Message 42 of 48
25 July 2007 at 8:13pm | IP Logged 
Hi..... i'm new here....
i just read this thread and i have to say something...
besides the last two posts, there hasn't been anyone mentioning using books or internet web pages to study. It seems like mostly language programs and flash cards are talked about.

I've been studying Spanish for years now (well, off and on i guess) but the fastest rate of learning the language was when I was reading books in Spanish (some manga). Even better is reading novels (make sure characters speech is up-to-date) with a corresponding English translation. This was after I took 3 years of Spanish in high school, and to be honest, school does not teach you enough. Language learning programs can only go so far, too.... I'd like to know why reading foreign books isn't hardly discussed (or am i missing something?)

I don't plan on posting here much (so i don't take up time that could be spent studying, hehe) but I wanted to get involved in this topic.....


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FSI
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 Message 43 of 48
25 July 2007 at 8:32pm | IP Logged 
I also find reading novels (plus accompanying translations, and an audiobook of the novel in the target language) to be the fastest way to achieve results in study.

Since discovering the efficiency of this method, I have left my other methods of study, and am making much progress because of it.

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Wings
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 Message 44 of 48
26 July 2007 at 5:13am | IP Logged 
Now this next suggestion wouldn’t be advisable to use on its own but as more of a “Multi Track Attack” method (Faber. B, 1991, pp60-73).   Barry Faber, would suggest to first read the first few chapters of a grammar book, and then to pick a news paper article read the first paragraph and with a highlighter mark the words you don’t know and look them up in a dictionary. He does admit that you may not find all the words you’re looking for, but you are picking up words that are in every day usage. He suggests you write the words on a business card- up to 20 at a time- and review them in your spare time (Faber. B, 1991). This is one meathod I have started using on my multi track attack of discovery.
One thing that I have noticed about everybody’s suggestions is that everybody learns using a few different methods at the same time. This apparently is the best way to learn. This apparently is the best way to learn.
“The point is supported by a research study carried out several decades ago, which concluded that students retain 10 percent of what they read, 26 percent of what they hear, 30 percent of what they see, 50 percent of what they see and hear, 70 percent of what they say, and 90 percent of what they say as they do something” (Stice., 1987).
Depending on what type of learner you are will dictate what approach will suit you best, whether it’s mostly reading, or mostly listening or speaking ECT…….. The only way you find your preference - if you will – is to try the “Multi Track Attack” and to work mostly the tools, such as: an audio course that suit your preference without of course forgetting the rest. Anybody agree?


Edited by Wings on 26 July 2007 at 7:00am

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ibanezmonster
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Studies: Japanese

 
 Message 45 of 48
26 July 2007 at 8:16am | IP Logged 
i just saw the audio book thread..... nice. ;)



“The point is supported by a research study carried out several decades ago, which concluded that students retain 10 percent of what they read, 26 percent of what they hear, 30 percent of what they see, 50 percent of what they see and hear, 70 percent of what they say, and 90 percent of what they say as they do something” (Stice., 1987).
Depending on what type of learner you are will dictate what approach will suit you best, whether it’s mostly reading, or mostly listening or speaking ECT…….. The only way you find your preference - if you will – is to try the “Multi Track Attack” and to work mostly the tools, such as: an audio course that suit your preference without of course forgetting the rest. Anybody agree?

i agree... though i also wonder how how they distinguish "seeing" from "reading".
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Wings
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 Message 46 of 48
26 July 2007 at 8:23am | IP Logged 
Seeing is, Seeing imagery in your mind’s eye, like when using mnemonics. Or associating a picture or drawing with an idea. There’s lots.

Edited by Wings on 26 July 2007 at 8:25am

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ibanezmonster
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Studies: Japanese

 
 Message 47 of 48
26 July 2007 at 8:54am | IP Logged 
ahhhhh i see, cool. It is easier to remember words that are more concrete rather than abstract, so i see what you mean.

if anyone is reading this who studies Japanese, i've figured out a great way to study just now.
Go to one of those links with the Japanese text and use RikaiChan to look up words, and then of course look at the English translation (if there is one) and listen to the audio. With a QUICK dictionary like this one and an English translation, you can understand anything in the Japanese text quickly, which is the whole goal. Perfect, i just don't know what to say, this has to be the best method of studying i've discovered. Thanks again for the links.
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FSI
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 Message 48 of 48
26 July 2007 at 2:04pm | IP Logged 
ibanezmonster, your method for Japanese sounds very interesting. However, I wonder - how do you learn which words/characters associate with what you're hearing?

When listen-reading to a language with a Latin script, it is relatively simple to match what you read in the L2 to what you hear in the L2.

But when L-Ring non-Latin alphabet languages, how do you suggest one learns to sync the written L2 to the spoken L2?


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