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Listening-Reading system

 Language Learning Forum : Learning Techniques, Methods & Strategies (Topic Closed Topic Closed) Post Reply
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Zhuangzi
Nonaglot
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Canada
lingq.com
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 Message 289 of 489
25 August 2007 at 11:02am | IP Logged 
After a lot more experimenting I now think that listening to L2 while reading L1 is a rather unimportant, occasional and perhaps transitional thing to do.

The three dominant activities for me are

1) listening to L2 on its own
2) reading L2 while saving words and phrases
3) reading L2 without looking up words
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FSI
Senior Member
United States
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 Message 290 of 489
27 August 2007 at 7:35pm | IP Logged 
Eve wrote:
My favorite language related activity right now is watching Spanish movies with subtitles, preferably in Spanish. But whenever I get DVD's from Netflix they only have options for English subtitles. Strange. Telenovelas usually have closed captions in Spanish so I have one that I watch every nite. And with DVR it's very convenient. I noticed that my listening skills improved a lot and sometimes I don't even need to read the captions to understand the language. So, in my opinion it's a very useful tool for language learner.


This is another variation of listen-reading :^) Your L2 audio, of course, is the audio from the film or novela. The L1 text is the subtitle in your teaching language, and the L2 text is the subtitle in your target language.

I believe this method to be the core of how adults may most quickly learn languages. It comes in many forms, but the central tenets - maximizing comprehensible input by taking advantage of the dual modalities of aural and visual input - are common regardless of variation. The differences lie in the forms in which one receives the L2 audio, the L1 text, and the L2 text.
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Asiafeverr
Diglot
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Hong Kong
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 Message 291 of 489
13 September 2007 at 10:46am | IP Logged 
Just wanted to make something clear to me:

Do I have to read the whole book at once, listen to the whole audio at once, etc. or do I break it up in chapters and apply the method to 1 chapter at a time? Applying the method to 1 book at a time seems strange and applying it to 1 chapter at a time seems more logical because you would remember what just happened but I just wanted to confirm.
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jeff_lindqvist
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 Message 292 of 489
13 September 2007 at 12:20pm | IP Logged 
I've asked about that too (some 10-20 pages back). It should be OK to read what you can remember instead of wading through 500 pages (Iversen's post about Anna Karenina still echoes in my mind).
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FSI
Senior Member
United States
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550 posts - 590 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 293 of 489
13 September 2007 at 12:39pm | IP Logged 
It depends on you. I vastly prefer going through an entire book at a time, several times, until I've finished it. By finished it, I mean having read it several times fluidly in the target language, having listened to it several times in the target language, and having orally shadowed it several times in the language.

It's a difference in approach between a piecemeal and a globalistic take. I feel I get far more out of it by sweeping the entire book at a time, particularly due to the concept of distributed practice - one learns and retains things best when the learning is spaced over a larger span of time than when it's clustered over a smaller portion.

For example, if you repeat a chapter ten times over the course of a month (by visiting it each time you sweep through the book, for example), you will retain it for far longer than if you repeat the chapter ten times in a week. A natural way of increasing the spaces between repetitions is simply to read the entire book at a time.

Working through the material one chapter at a time may give you a sense of faster learning (as you're simply retreading the same territory in much shorter intervals), but for long-term retention, and *learning* (as opposed to cramming), the repetitions work best when your brain has a chance to forget, and remember, and forget, and remember, and eventually perfectly remember them in successively deeper layers.

It was my strategy when using FSI, and it works wonderfully in listen-reading as well. What is learned quickly is quickly forgotten. What is learned over time is far more likely to immesh itself into the brain for longer periods of time. That's why habits are so hard to make (and break) - you need to do them over and over again over weeks and months (or stop doing them completely for weeks and months) to reroute your neural circuitry.

Edited by FSI on 13 September 2007 at 12:45pm

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Asiafeverr
Diglot
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Hong Kong
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 Message 294 of 489
13 September 2007 at 12:51pm | IP Logged 
Thanks a lot FSI, that's what I was looking for :)
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mjcdchess
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United States
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Speaks: English*, Spanish

 
 Message 295 of 489
18 September 2007 at 8:40pm | IP Logged 
I have been delighted to try this method with Spanish. It makes the study interesting and that is a plus for me. Spanish Language materials are all over the place where I live. Getting audio materials for Chinese that you can also get a good english translation for has proved more difficult.

I think it will achieve excellent results


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MarcoDiAngelo
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Yugoslavia
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 Message 296 of 489
10 October 2007 at 1:30pm | IP Logged 
So, did anyone actually tried "Listening-Reading"? Any experiences?


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