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Polyliteracy - Ten Year Reading Plan

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patuco
Diglot
Moderator
Gibraltar
Joined 6741 days ago

3795 posts - 4268 votes 
Speaks: Spanish, English*
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 49 of 77
07 October 2007 at 3:46am | IP Logged 
luke wrote:
At the moment, Esperanto, English, and Spanish are getting more focus...

How come? Would you forget your own native language? ;-)
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luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6931 days ago

3133 posts - 4351 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 50 of 77
07 October 2007 at 7:01am | IP Logged 
patuco wrote:
luke wrote:
At the moment, Esperanto, English, and Spanish are
getting more focus...

How come? Would you forget your own native language? ;-)

Shakespeare uses language beautifully and in an unusual manner. To understand him
requires some effort on my part. The Federalist Papers, a set of letters to the
citizens of New York exhorting acceptance of the U.S. Constitution employ a writing
style that takes some effort to understand. I'm comprehending them pretty well now,
and continue to listen to them to develop a better foundation in that important body
of works. 17th Century philosophers have been easier to understand, but took a few
hours to get used to.

So, if I am reading any difficult literature, that requires a dictionary, I might
consider that "studying English". I'd imagine the experience is somewhat like a
Spanish speaker reading Don Quijote de la Mancha.

For the beginning hobbyist language learner, my recommendation would be to start with
the classical works in your native tongue. They may be challenging, but if you give
up after 100 hours, your life will be enriched by your study. Getting up to speed on
language that is a few hundred years old isn't that difficult, but will introduce
some words that are no longer in common use, some that have changed meaning, and
archaic grammatical structures that can get one into the whole "language learning"
mode.

Second recommendation would be then to learn Esperanto if one has any interest in it
at all. It's as easy as they come, and speakers perhaps tend to be more open and
forgiving than a random speaker of a national language. This will give one an idea
of what it takes to develop fluency in a foreign language.

With those two items under your belt, move on to whatever language interests you the
most.

I'm assuming that the hobbyist wants a high level of fluency, but doesn't have a
specific need such as a family member who speaks a language they need to know, or
they've moved to a country where they need a foreign language.

For instance, in the U.S. learning Spanish because it seems fun or useful is not
uncommon. However, the challenges of language learning may cause fledgling students
to abort the project once they realize that it isn't easy, and that many immigrants
would rather practice their English. Or maybe for some, just having Pimsleur I under
their belt makes them happier.

There you have it.

Edited by luke on 30 May 2008 at 3:59pm

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luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6931 days ago

3133 posts - 4351 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 51 of 77
12 October 2007 at 10:12pm | IP Logged 
I'm ready to officially start Assimil New French with Ease. Although I've listened up to about lesson at my one a day rate, I'm ready to start talking and follow the instructions a bit closer. The instructions do say to be creative, and I'll continue to do that, but I'll follow the listen, understand, and repeat method. Should I write out the lesson? The instructions never say to do that, but I could see that being helpful for focusing on the details. Right now I'm tired and think today isn't the day to start writing the lesson.
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Sim
Diglot
Groupie
Canada
thehelper.net/forums
Joined 6016 days ago

45 posts - 48 votes
Speaks: French*, English
Studies: Spanish

 
 Message 52 of 77
15 October 2007 at 8:02pm | IP Logged 
Learning Spanish through Assimil as well as German taught me that it was a very good learning tool indeed ;)

Well, even if you're at only one lesson a day, if you have time to invest you could write them down. Otherwise, you might want, if you are dedicated enough, to do 2 lessons a day.

If you write them down though, you might want to write down the vocabulary words and such, even if it's written that you should not.

Edited by Sim on 15 October 2007 at 8:03pm

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luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6931 days ago

3133 posts - 4351 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 53 of 77
15 October 2007 at 8:46pm | IP Logged 
Sim wrote:
Learning Spanish through Assimil as well as German taught me that it was a very good learning tool indeed ;)

Well, even if you're at only one lesson a day, if you have time to invest you could write them down.


Did you use French as the base for learning Spanish? I think the Assimil French courses for English speakers (New French with Ease and Using French) are well done.

Today I am on lesson 4. Perhaps I should take the time right now to write out the first 4 lessons.

... later

I wrote out lesson 1. That was good for focusing on details such as gender and accents. I also repeated each sentence while looking away from the book, which has been mentioned as an Assimil technique. That seems helpful too.

Edited by luke on 15 October 2007 at 9:28pm

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moisa
Triglot
Newbie
Brazil
Joined 6401 days ago

23 posts - 23 votes
Speaks: Portuguese*, EnglishC1, Spanish
Studies: French

 
 Message 54 of 77
19 October 2007 at 9:52am | IP Logged 
Hi everyone. I would like some advice for where to go now. I finished Pimsleur French course and have been using BBC´s Ma France for while, but I need something to learn writing and grammar as well. I feel like something more complete.
thanks.
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luke
Diglot
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6931 days ago

3133 posts - 4351 votes 
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: Esperanto, French

 
 Message 55 of 77
30 May 2008 at 3:50pm | IP Logged 
It has been a while since I've updated this log, and I did let French languish for
several months. I began picking it up again about 2 weeks ago.

My current approach:
1) Listen to and read 7 Assimil French with Ease lessons. Highlight important
points, etc in the book. This study day may take an hour or so. I haven't timed it.
Basically I am preparing for the upcoming week with this step. As I do the
highlighting, I have the audio for the lesson I am working in a continual loop so I
can begin to understand it.

2) Using the highlighting and marks in step 1 makes a micro review (1 minute or less)
of the 7 lessons possible. I do that micro review a few times a week.

3) I had already edited the audio and I have recordings that are just the dialog.
I.E. there are no "lesson onze" nor exercises in the recordings I am using. This
makes a weeks worth of audio only about 7 minutes long, which is perfect. The first
week, I listened to these twice a day. This second week, I listened to lessons 1-13.
My plan here is to review the last two weeks audio each day in my car. I repeat with
the audio, trying to pronounce correctly, etc. This takes only about 12 -15 minutes
of commute time per day.

That's it for Assimil technique right now. During another loop through the lessons I
may focus more on individual lessons, rather than doing about 14 per day. At the
rate I'm going, the book will take about 4 months. I imagine looping through it at
several times. I may slip in the Using French book first using this high level
approach. At some point I'll need to focus on details, but that time is not now.

I bought DVDs of the 52 episodes for French in Action for $80 from
http://completeseries.tv. I like them a lot
better than the free stuff on learner.org. I also picked up the textbook, study
guide, and workbook for part 1. The study guide appears helpful, as it
has an episode guide and cultural information that are meant to be read before
watching the video. The problem with FiA is dedicating 1/2 hour per day to it. That
may be difficult going forward. For a couple days though, I've used a schedule like
this, but my loved one is out of town:

AM:episode 2, PM episode 3
AM episode 3, PM episode 4

That's actually an hour per day. I also have been listening to the text workup
portion of the audio lessons, which are designed to be used after watching the video
and don't need support from a book. This makes them good for commute time. This is
about 1/2 of the audio per lesson. The other 1/2 of the audio apparently is highly
dependent upon the workbook, which I've barely cracked.

Reading some Farley postings on FiA got me to thinking about supporting the above
with Learn French In Your Car, which I have on tape. I was thinking of doing a
couple minutes a day of these to break up the pace.

The challenge is dedicating this much time to French. If I drop some portions of my
study, and I think that is likely, the FiA seems most likely to go, since it requires
dedicated TV time, for which I seldom have time.

I'm coming to believe in Professor A.'s notion of letting the language take root
over a number of years. That seems doable with an Assimil type course. If life
changes and I can give more time to the TV, then FiA may get a bigger role. Then
again, I could target one episode a week for the time being.

Clearly I plan to repeat the course over and over, learning more over time, rather
than perfecting a lesson before moving on. I very much prefer a global to learning
and I think paying to much attention to details slows me down in getting the
foundation which I find so helpful.

Edited by luke on 30 May 2008 at 3:57pm

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reineke
Senior Member
United States
https://learnalangua
Joined 6173 days ago

851 posts - 1008 votes 
Studies: German

 
 Message 56 of 77
03 June 2008 at 9:44pm | IP Logged 
Hey, luke, have a little fun with the language however fossilized it may be. You must have some DVDs lying around with a French language track. No I don't mean "French in action" :) Pop them in and wake the monster. Most people nowadays want to skip all the courses and just have fun. You're sort of the opposite. Don't overdo it with that assimil course of yours :)


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