Register  Login  Active Topics  Maps  

Ideal systematic training in polyglottery

 Language Learning Forum : Lessons in Polyglottery Post Reply
43 messages over 6 pages: 1 24 5 6  Next >>
Pip
Diglot
Groupie
South Africa
Joined 6289 days ago

48 posts - 55 votes 
Speaks: English*, Afrikaans
Studies: French

 
 Message 17 of 43
24 December 2007 at 6:27am | IP Logged 
Professor I have been reading all the threads about your proposal and I must say it sounds rather interesting, and I will definitely be interested in attending such a facility. As you said in your post with our help you will soon have an outline of a serious proposal, so if there is anything I could help with, let me know.
1 person has voted this message useful



KSaku39
Diglot
Newbie
United States
Joined 6673 days ago

30 posts - 31 votes
Speaks: English*, Spanish
Studies: French

 
 Message 18 of 43
07 January 2008 at 8:05pm | IP Logged 
Reposted

Hello Professor Arguelles,

I noticed that at your idealized polyglot school one hour each day is devoted to meditation and focus training. This is one aspect of your regimen I don't believe you've yet explained, and I would appreciate a brief description.

Thanks,

Kevin Sakuraba


Edited by KSaku39 on 07 January 2008 at 8:06pm

1 person has voted this message useful



Volte
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Switzerland
Joined 6282 days ago

4474 posts - 6726 votes 
Speaks: English*, Esperanto, German, Italian
Studies: French, Finnish, Mandarin, Japanese

 
 Message 19 of 43
12 January 2008 at 9:10pm | IP Logged 
This post is a restatement of some of the larger questions from my previous post which remain unanswered.

It looks to me as though the current language tracks all include relatively diverse languages, where cultural similarities will be of more help than etymological and grammatical ones. What are your thoughts on this observation?

What level are students required to reach in each language studied? How much does this vary from language to language, and between tracks? How much student selection will there be in which great books to read, especially at the higher levels? How important is the study of older forms of the languages and/or how they have changed over time in the proposed tracks, and how much does this importance vary between them?

To what extent is practical use of the languages taught a goal of the program? You have clearly stated that it is secondary to building a deep humanistic base, on which encyclopedic knowledge can be layered, based on the great literature (in the widest sense) of the major living civilizations, but I am still in the dark as to what level of achievement is expected. What levels of passive and active proficiency do you consider desirable for a student to have at the end of this program? What are the minimums you consider acceptable?

How do you propose to do evaluations, grading, and testing? Specifically, what are the main objectives and criteria?

Which integral topics are students expected to study on their own, especially within the first two years? Will study methods ever explicitly be discussed, and if so, to what extent?

Regards;
Volte

1 person has voted this message useful



ProfArguelles
Moderator
United States
foreignlanguageexper
Joined 7099 days ago

609 posts - 2102 votes 

 
 Message 20 of 43
13 January 2008 at 9:05pm | IP Logged 
Ms. Volte,

Thank you for streamlining your main points somewhat. I was very glad for the interest shown in your initial post and I will eventually attempt to cover all the points that you raised, but many of them relate to the actualization or realization of this dream (hopefully in some form in the very near future!), and right now I am still just struggling to articulate the ideal planning stages…

Alas, I will not have time this week to address any of your points, or to get to the role of meditation, as I had promised I would, or indeed to do any revising at all…

Next week and in future weeks, when I do get to these matters, please note again that it will be in the revised body of the working draft and not in the form of individual answers, in distinction to the way the other threads work.

1 person has voted this message useful



Kugel
Senior Member
United States
Joined 6381 days ago

497 posts - 555 votes 
Speaks: English*

 
 Message 21 of 43
27 January 2008 at 11:34pm | IP Logged 
If a student were to truly internalize all those great works; and in addition, know all those languages intimately, then I think some revolutionary new method of teaching would be needed. I think most people could not successfully accomplish all of that in a matter of 4 years under the current educational system.
1 person has voted this message useful



Volte
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Switzerland
Joined 6282 days ago

4474 posts - 6726 votes 
Speaks: English*, Esperanto, German, Italian
Studies: French, Finnish, Mandarin, Japanese

 
 Message 22 of 43
02 February 2008 at 10:46am | IP Logged 
Kugel wrote:
If a student were to truly internalize all those great works; and in addition, know all those languages intimately, then I think some revolutionary new method of teaching would be needed. I think most people could not successfully accomplish all of that in a matter of 4 years under the current educational system.


Read the first post of this thread carefully, or better yet, all of the posts on this sub-forum. Professor Arguelles is proposing to create an academy, where people study 9 or more hours a day, and proposing that the study consist not only of languages and great works, but also of focus and meditation techniques. This is very, very distant from the norms of the current educational system.

The revolutionary new method is simple: have intelligent students who are deeply interested in the topic, and something demanding to aim for. It is far from unknown for people to study at this depth when they are passionate about a topic.

The current higher education system is increasingly undemanding and watered down, requiring little more than attendance, occasional perfunctory study, and various amounts of what is often little more than shallow make-work. The proposed academy is, in large part, a reaction to that, in my opinion.

1 person has voted this message useful



Alkeides
Senior Member
Bhutan
Joined 5991 days ago

636 posts - 644 votes 

 
 Message 23 of 43
02 February 2008 at 11:59am | IP Logged 
I am also intrigued that it seems to consist mainly of self-study, the ideal way of learning anything. Increasing the hours of contact curriculum time in school does not lead to more learning taking place, most of the top students I know are highly motivated to seek knowledge themselves and often learn topics weeks if not months ahead of the school's pace.
1 person has voted this message useful



rob
Diglot
Senior Member
Japan
Joined 6008 days ago

287 posts - 288 votes 
2 sounds
Speaks: English*, Japanese
Studies: French, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese, Norwegian, Mandarin

 
 Message 24 of 43
02 February 2008 at 12:16pm | IP Logged 
Dear Professor Arguelles,

Further to your proposal for the PhD programme, I wondered if you are aware of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project at SOAS. I think that you will probably be aware of this due to your interest, but in the case that you are not, I thought I would bring it to your attention. You can access the web page here.

Of course, the UK education system works differently from the US one, but basically, it is a 3 year (minimum) course which takes place after a 1 year MA course. While this can be taken by a student with or without a first degree in linguistics, the content of the masters course will vary accordingly. Students are trained in fieldwork and language documentation, then given the funding and resources to construct a complete language course/guide for future generations.

This is somewhat of a side note, but while I have mentioned it, the UK system has a 3 year undergraduate, 1 year postgraduate and 3 year doctorate system. Your programme (undoubtedly in line with the US system) consists of a 4 year undergraduate, 2 year MA, 2 year MPhil and 4 year PhD. Do you see any advantage in 12 years of university over 7 years in the UK, whereby one could begin documenting a language sooner rather than learning bredth and depth of languages which one could do independly of the education system once trained in this way?

Edited by rob on 02 February 2008 at 12:26pm



1 person has voted this message useful



This discussion contains 43 messages over 6 pages: << Prev 1 24 5 6  Next >>


Post ReplyPost New Topic Printable version Printable version

You cannot post new topics in this forum - You cannot reply to topics in this forum - You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum - You cannot create polls in this forum - You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page was generated in 0.2969 seconds.


DHTML Menu By Milonic JavaScript
Copyright 2024 FX Micheloud - All rights reserved
No part of this website may be copied by any means without my written authorization.