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Which Scandinavian language do you learn?

 Language Learning Forum : Skandinavisk & Nordisk Post Reply
Poll Question: Which Nordic language are you learning?
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
42 [38.53%]
17 [15.60%]
38 [34.86%]
10 [9.17%]
2 [1.83%]
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42 messages over 6 pages: 1 2 3 46  Next >>
Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
Joined 4791 days ago

9753 posts - 15776 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Danish, Romanian, Polish, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Slovenian, Catalan, Czech, Galician, Dutch, Swedish

 
 Message 33 of 42
01 March 2014 at 3:19am | IP Logged 
But doesn't it feel unnatural exactly because the differences are very small, yet you can't rely on your own judgement and need to use dictionaries? At least it's similar to my issues with Belarusian.

And the link is great regardless of whether it applies here. (sad how it makes me think of Russia and Ukraine in the same terms as Croatia and Serbia...)
1 person has voted this message useful



Lizzern
Diglot
Senior Member
Norway
Joined 4103 days ago

791 posts - 1053 votes 
Speaks: Norwegian*, English
Studies: Japanese

 
 Message 34 of 42
01 March 2014 at 11:24am | IP Logged 
Serpent wrote:
But doesn't it feel unnatural exactly because the differences are very small, yet you can't rely on your own judgement and need to use dictionaries? At least it's similar to my issues with Belarusian.


I never felt like I would've been alright 90% of the time if I'd just written it in dialect. Far from it. (And I've seen people write our dialect - it's noticeably different from nynorsk.) But sometimes we'd do that - like if we couldn't find it in the dictionary, or couldn't figure out how to translate an idiom from bokmål - and just accept the very real risk of getting the red pen treatment after. Even after checking everything with a dictionary, it wasn't a pretty sight... There are so many words that are different in nynorsk that it felt kind of like trying to write a dialect from somewhere else (or... from nowhere, I still don't know anyone who uses those words except in writing). So it didn't really help that some words and bits of grammar were the same. People who learned it as their first written language might feel differently, but the majority of us were just awkward about it and didn't feel like it was familiar at all, despite some similarities. If this is supposedly my language it shouldn't feel so awkward...

Liz
1 person has voted this message useful



Serpent
Octoglot
Senior Member
Russian Federation
serpent-849.livejour
Joined 4791 days ago

9753 posts - 15776 votes 
4 sounds
Speaks: Russian*, English, FinnishC1, Latin, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Danish, Romanian, Polish, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Slovenian, Catalan, Czech, Galician, Dutch, Swedish

 
 Message 35 of 42
01 March 2014 at 4:24pm | IP Logged 
Well but the small differences can manifest themselves in various ways. For example, some Belarusian words have entirely different roots (often from Polish), but most are just slightly different from the Russian equivalents. I'd call the languages 90% similar despite the fact that there are very few words that are written AND pronounced the same way.
1 person has voted this message useful



Medulin
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Croatia
Joined 2862 days ago

1199 posts - 2192 votes 
Speaks: Croatian*, English, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Norwegian, Hindi, Nepali

 
 Message 36 of 42
02 March 2014 at 12:50am | IP Logged 
Lizzern wrote:
Serpent wrote:
But doesn't it feel unnatural exactly because the differences are very small, yet you can't rely on your own judgement and need to use dictionaries? At least it's similar to my issues with Belarusian.


I never felt like I would've been alright 90% of the time if I'd just written it in dialect. Far from it. (And I've seen people write our dialect - it's noticeably different from nynorsk.) But sometimes we'd do that - like if we couldn't find it in the dictionary, or couldn't figure out how to translate an idiom from bokmål - and just accept the very real risk of getting the red pen treatment after. Even after checking everything with a dictionary, it wasn't a pretty sight... There are so many words that are different in nynorsk that it felt kind of like trying to write a dialect from somewhere else (or... from nowhere, I still don't know anyone who uses those words except in writing). So it didn't really help that some words and bits of grammar were the same. People who learned it as their first written language might feel differently, but the majority of us were just awkward about it and didn't feel like it was familiar at all, despite some similarities. If this is supposedly my language it shouldn't feel so awkward...

Liz
Rogaland is a lost case for Nynorsk anyway.
The language council doesn't consider it ''Nynorsk core'' area anymore.
Nynorsk-people don't care about Rogaland city people either,
you could write and speak Riskmaal if you please.


Overall, in Stavanger there is the most obvious example of diglossia in whole Norway,
the differences between the Stavanger dialect and moderate Bokmaal
are like the differences between Bern dialect and Hochdeutsch.

At least in Bergen, many people speak and write in the same way.


Some people like diglossia, some don't.
I personally hate it.

That's why I switched from Norwegian to Swedish.
And it's great to hear Swedish speak the same way they write,
the only difference being the pitch accent, and a few pronunciation differences
(like the pronunciation of R or SJ).



Edited by Medulin on 02 March 2014 at 12:56am

1 person has voted this message useful



tarvos
Super Polyglot
Winner TAC 2012
Senior Member
China
likeapolyglot.wordpr
Joined 2901 days ago

5310 posts - 9398 votes 
Speaks: Dutch*, English, Swedish, French, Russian, German, Italian, Norwegian, Mandarin, Romanian, Afrikaans
Studies: Greek, Modern Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Czech, Korean, Esperanto, Finnish

 
 Message 37 of 42
02 March 2014 at 11:55am | IP Logged 
Medulin has clearly never heard a Scanian or a Gotlander speak, haha...
2 persons have voted this message useful





Fasulye
Heptaglot
Winner TAC 2012
Moderator
Germany
fasulyespolyglotblog
Joined 4041 days ago

5445 posts - 6003 votes 
1 sounds
Speaks: German*, DutchC1, EnglishB2, French, Italian, Spanish, Esperanto
Studies: Latin, Danish, Norwegian, Turkish
Personal Language Map

 
 Message 38 of 42
10 April 2014 at 5:56pm | IP Logged 
I have just cast my vote that I have been studying Norwegian Bokmål as well since May / July 2013. (besides Danish)

Fasulye
1 person has voted this message useful



Medulin
Tetraglot
Senior Member
Croatia
Joined 2862 days ago

1199 posts - 2192 votes 
Speaks: Croatian*, English, Spanish, Portuguese
Studies: Norwegian, Hindi, Nepali

 
 Message 39 of 42
10 April 2014 at 9:09pm | IP Logged 
tarvos wrote:
Medulin has clearly never heard a Scanian or a Gotlander speak, haha...


I haven't?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BsgIkyZh1-I

I even got a TTS voice with a Scanian accent (made available by Acapela TTS) so it reads all documents with this accent.

Edited by Medulin on 10 April 2014 at 9:23pm

1 person has voted this message useful



eyðimörk
Triglot
Senior Member
France
goo.gl/aT4FY7
Joined 2293 days ago

490 posts - 1157 votes 
Speaks: Swedish*, English, French
Studies: Breton, Italian

 
 Message 40 of 42
11 April 2014 at 10:24am | IP Logged 
Medulin wrote:
tarvos wrote:
Medulin has clearly never heard a Scanian or a Gotlander speak, haha...


I haven't?

I even got a TTS voice with a Scanian accent (made available by Acapela TTS) so it reads all documents with this accent.

I think we need to distinguish between a Scanian/Gotlander speaking and a Scanian/Gotlander speaking dialect (something you're unlikely to run into as a non-native).

I have never not been understood for the sake of my Scanian accent (though my origins are usually evident no matter how fancy schmancy a fake "standardised" Swedish I try to put on... I just can't do that fancy school teacher R). I have, however, met plenty of people born and raised in Scania, but whose parents are not native Scanians, who do not understand me when I speak dialect. Speaking dialect in that kind of company however is something of a party trick. It's something you speak within the family, not with peers.


1 person has voted this message useful



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